1
2TABLE OF CONTENTS SECTION ONE: INTRODUCTIONMission
Statement
Current
Industry
–
The
Facts
Conquer
Products
and
Services
D...
3Technological
Analysis
Market
Analysis
Competition
Analysis
Marketing
Mix
Strategies
Video
Street
Team
Touring
Additional...
4SECTION
FIVE:
PERFORM
AND
PROMOTE


Promotion/Marketing/Networking
New
Material
Networking/Marketing
Yourself/Your
“Brand...
5Following
Up
With
Venues

SECTION
SIX:
FAN
INTERACTION


Growing
Your
Fan
Base
Developing
A
Solid
Street
Team
Designing
a...
6Introduction

Welcome
to
Conquer
Entertainment
‐
your
personal
key
to
the
entertainment
world!

Your
decision
to
become
a...
7
MISSION
STATEMENT

Conquer
Entertainment
is
a
turn‐key
solution
for
an
artist
or
their
team
to
open,
own,
and
successful...
8
USING
THE
CONQUER
ONLINE
ADMIN

(include
screenshots
for
each
step
in
each
section)

How
to
Sign
Up
(For
ULO
Package)
 ...
9ULO
Services:
Recording
Music
Production
Mixing/Mastering
Photography
Video
Production
Graphic/Web
Design
Legal

Below
is...
10Engineering

Mixing/Mastering
‐
The
mixing
and
mastering
services
are
for
UnLabel
owners
who
have
demo
songs
recorded
an...
11Photography

The
basic
photography
package
is
for
UnLabel
owners
who
want
candid
photos
for
a
press
kit
or
other
promoti...
12• Age
Limit
(All,
18
+,
21
+)
• Headlining
Band/Artist
Name
(and
picture
if
able)
• Other
Acts
Names

Merchandising
Serv...
13
Established
Brand/Image
(main
“style”):______________________________________
Album/Single/Demo
Sales:_________________...
14You
may
also
want
to
establish
an
online
presence
once
your
image
is
defined.

Stage
Two:

No
Internet
presence

If
you
...
15you?

What
are
your
fans
like?

The
answers
to
these
questions
determine
the
path
your
career
will
take
as
well
as
measu...
16 Where
am
I
now?
 Set
dates
(estimated)
 Determine
smaller
goals
(set
realistic
dates
for
each)

Breaking
down
your
b...
17
Once
you
have
narrowed
down
your
goals
into
specific
categories,
you
want
to
break
them
down
further
into
daily,
weekly...
18Some
of
your
inspiration(s):_______________________________________________

What
is
it
about
your
inspirations
that
mak...
19
How
do
others
view
you?
_______________________________________________________________________________________________...
20what
grabs
your
attention,
and
use
that
to
work
on
an
image
for
yourself.



Style
is
formed
when
you
consistently
put
f...
21_____________________________


When
youve
decided
upon
some
themes
for
yourself,
circle
your
top
three
and
build
your
i...
22LOGO/BRANDING/SITE
“MATCHING”

When
developing
a
logo
for
yourself,
consider
your
branding
“themes”,
“signature
style”
a...
23Some
branding
examples:

ARTIST
 FROM
 TO
50
Cent
(Rapper)

Brand:
“Street”
to
“Business”






Justin
Timberlake
(Singe...
24
 
Christina
Aguilera
(Singer/Performer)

Brand:
“Cute/Innocent”
to
“Sexy/Dominating”







25Gwen
Stefani
(No
Doubt)

Brand:
“Punk
Pop”
to
“Hip
Hop/Dynamic”




Madonna
(Singer/Performer)

Brand:
“Sexy/Innocent”
t...
26














27
With
each
BRAND
EXAMPLE,
you
can
see
the
evolution
from
one
“theme”
to
the
next,
especially
with
Madonna
and
Gwen
Stefa...
28festivals,
it
would
be
good
to
mention
them
here.



Purpose
and
Objectives

This
section
should
list
your
“short
term”
...
29

Demographics
–
Social
and
cultural
This
section
should
describe
your
existing
fan
base
in
detail
(location,
age,
gende...
30Competition
Analysis
This
should
highlight
artists
similar
to
your
“style”
and
“genre”,
and
what
makes
you
thrive
over
y...
31
Distribution
and
Retail
This
section
should
describe
where
your
distribution
and
retail
focus
will
be,
and
should
also
...
32Video
This
will
outline
how
your
video
will
be/is
used
for
promotional
purposes
(i.e.
media
outlets/targets)

Street
Tea...
33Promotional
Merchandise
This
section
should
go
over
the
current
merchandise
“inventory”
and
promo
materials
(such
as
fly...
34• Assist
in
Street
Team
Development
◦ Help
develop
a
fan
base
• Develop
Press
Kits
◦ E‐Kits,
traditional
paper
press
kit...
35operations
• Work
with
and
captain
musicians
• Book
studio
time
(optional)
• Listen
to
and
fine
tune
recorded
music
• Ch...
36BOOKING
AGENT
 • Researches
the
potential
venues
for
your
act
• Negotiates
with
venue
to
get
performances
with
a
“draw”
...
37• Venue’s
Audience
Limit
• Ticket
Price
• Agreed
ticket
price
for
patrons
and
split
percentages
• Fee
Payment
Schedule
•...
38master
your
material
with
your
Conquer
Reward
points.

Using
the
“Production”
service
If
you
don’t
want
to
produce
your
...
39Picking
songs
to
record
After
youve
established
some
songs
you
feel
really
good
about
and
want
to
further
produce,
use
t...
40dont
print
over
one
or
two
thousand
simply
because
there
wouldnt
be
a
demand
for
more
than
that
amount.

As
an
UnLabel
o...
41released
yet!

Promotion
and
Marketing

Use
e‐flyers,
fans,
existing
press
relationships,
social
networks,
promotional
m...
42


ARTIST
 LATEST“SINGLE”/CD
RELEASE
MERCHANDISE
EXAMPLE
Hanson
Pop/Rock
band

Shout
It
Out


Lady
GaGa
Pop
Singer/Songw...
43Eminem
Rapper
Recovery

Adam
Lambert
Pop/Glam‐Rock
Singer
For
Your
Entertainment





After
youve
appropriately
matched
...
44have
to
find
places
to
sell
your
merchandise
at.

Some
good
locations
to
start
would
be:
• Weekly
show

• Online
store
•...
45owners
are
a
network
of
people
that
promote
(daily)
Market
America
products
and
services
that
they
take
a
liking
to.

Si...
46
 Blogging/Micro
Blogging
 Podcasting
 Video
Blogging
 Message
Board
 Photo
Sharing

A
good
way
to
see
what
network...
47 Chat
with
"friends"
(either
by
instant
message
or
e‐mail)
 Change
profile
"theme"
(make
it
customized
to
YOU)
 Downl...
48

Shy/Timid

If
you
consider
yourself
to
be
"shy",
then
photo
sharing
may
be
the
best
route
for
you.

Sites
like
Flickr,...
49 Contact
page


Cover
and
Cover
Letter

 This
section
should
be
very
brief
(one
to
three
paragraphs)
explaining
you
as
...
50
I
feel
their
songs
are
well‐constructed
and
radio
ready
and
value
your
professional
input.


Ill
give
you
a
call
in
a
f...
51CALIBUR.

Formed
in
1994,
CALIBUR
is
the
perfect
blend
of
edgy,
grunge
rock

and
roll
and
raspy
classic
blues.

Starting...
52booking
yourself
shows!

The
more
exposure
you
can
get,
the
better!

If
you
do
have
performances,
they
should
be
listed
...
53

If
you
consider
yourself
to
be
more
of
an
"internet"
artist,
you
can
create
a
one‐page
"e‐kit"
and
a
custom
domain/".c...
54










Traditional
Press
Kit
 Electronic
Press
Kit
 One
Sheet
Press
Kit

 


55



 



 

56
Choosing
the
right
press
kit
“template”
Each
press
kit
design
has
a
particular
purpose.

A
traditional
press
kit,
for
e...
57superstar
and
your
fans
hang
on
your
every
word,
they
will
lose
interest
quick.

Also,
make
it
a
point
to
let
the
audien...
583. Artist
is
notified
via
email
and
getConquer
artist
admin
whether
they
are
approved
or
denied
for
the
show.
4. Conquer...
59“happenings”
‐
upcoming
shows,
release
parties,
single
release,
EP/album
release,
website
updates,
blog
or
vlog
(video
b...
60(stage
left,
stage
right,
upstage
left,
upstage
right,
etc.)










PAYING
FOR
THE
TOUR
Touring
can
be
a
VERY
profita...
61company
sponsorships
(instrument,
gear).
For
example,
if
you
are
a
drummer
and
all
you
use
is
Vic
Firth
sticks,
contact
...
UnLabelHandbook_Nov2012
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UnLabelHandbook_Nov2012

  1. 1. 1
  2. 2. 2TABLE OF CONTENTS SECTION ONE: INTRODUCTIONMission
Statement
Current
Industry
–
The
Facts
Conquer
Products
and
Services
Description
and
Pricing
Service
Description

Conquer
Rewards
How
It
Works
How
To
Choose
and
Use
Each
Service
SECTION TWO: BRAND AND IMAGEGoal
Statements
SWOT
Analysis
Building
a
Brand
Image
Finding
your
“Signature
Style”
Developing
Your
“Theme”
Logo/Site
Design
and
“Matching”
Branding
Examples

Developing
A
Marketing
Plan
Mission
Statement
Background
Purpose
and
Objectives
Environmental
Analysis
Political
Analysis
Economic
Analysis

  3. 3. 3Technological
Analysis
Market
Analysis
Competition
Analysis
Marketing
Mix
Strategies
Video
Street
Team
Touring
Additional
Opportunities
Proposed
Budget



SECTION
THREE:
CREATING
YOUR
PRODUCT

Developing
A
“Single”
Developing
An
“EP/LP/Album”
Using
the
services

Songwriting
Demoing
Recording
Album
Artwork
Physical
vs.
Online
Distribution
Planning
An
“Album/EP”
Release
Party

SECTION
FOUR:
TEAMWORK

Establishing
A
Team
Team
Roles
Contracts/Agreements
Manager/Artist
Touring
–
Contracts
&
Riders
Other
Contracts



  4. 4. 4SECTION
FIVE:
PERFORM
AND
PROMOTE


Promotion/Marketing/Networking
New
Material
Networking/Marketing
Yourself/Your
“Brand”
Which
social
site
is
best
for
your
personality
Press
Kits
Traditional
Press
Kits
E‐Kits
(Electronic
Press
Kits)
One
Page
Press
Kits
Press
Kit
Examples
Performing
Conquer
Touring
System
How
It
Works
Outline
of
Standard
Showcase/Event
Opening
For
A
Show
Headlining
A
Show

Getting
Paid
For
The
Show

After
The
Show
Planning
Your
Own
Tour
Stage
Plot/Input
List

Using
The
UnLabel
Admin
Tour
Section
Getting
On
An
Existing
Tour
Paying
For
The
Tour
How
To
Get
A
Booking
Agent
Finding
Transportation
Tour
Managers
Job
Hiring
A
Publicist
Marketing/Promoting
The
Tour

Selling
The
Right
Merchandise
Planning
An
International
Tour
Rules/Regulations
Contracts
Itinerary
Scheduling

  5. 5. 5Following
Up
With
Venues

SECTION
SIX:
FAN
INTERACTION


Growing
Your
Fan
Base
Developing
A
Solid
Street
Team
Designing
a
special
logo
Picking
a
captain
Assigning
tasks
Rewarding
members
Designing
a
special
section
on
website
Special
merchandise


SECTION
SEVEN:
SUSTAIN
AND
SUPPORT


Conquer
Training
Program
In
Person
Meetings
One‐to‐one
Meetings
Webinars
Audios
Powerpoints

Maintaining
Your
Successful
UnLabel
Conquer
Recording
Levels
Conquer
Simple
Seven
Steps
Conclusion




  6. 6. 6Introduction

Welcome
to
Conquer
Entertainment
‐
your
personal
key
to
the
entertainment
world!

Your
decision
to
become
an
UnLabel
owner
puts
the
power
of
your
career
in
your
hands.

Record
label
operations
are
at
a
steady
decline
as
independent
labels
rise,
and
the
UnLabel
system
provides
you
with
the
recipe
for
success
without
the
headaches
and
expensive
costs
of
the
traditional
label
model.

Instead
of
giving
out
large
sums
of
money
and
putting
you
in
debt,
Conquer
Entertainment
gives
you
the
services
you
most
need
to
build
and
establish
your
career;
wherever
you
may
be
in
it!

The
information
in
this
manual
will
teach
you
everything
you
could
possibly
need
to
know
to
run
and
maintain
a
thriving
independent
label.

With
the
Conquer
Entertainment
UnLabel
opportunity,
you
will
learn
how
to
build
your
own
unique
“artist
brand”,
make
the
connections
you
need
to
get
to
the
next
step,
organize
and
promote
your
own
tour,
establish
a
unique
and
personal
relationship
with
your
fans,
choose
your
right
business
partners,
what
services
to
use
at
your
specific
point
in
your
career,
how
to
promote
your
music
to
its
full
potential,
and
everything
that
comes
with
the
ever‐changing
entertainment
industry.

It
is
highly
suggested
and
encouraged
for
you
to
read
all
of
the
information
in
this
manual
to
better
achieve
success
and
wealth
with
your
UnLabel
business.

The
services
that
Conquer
Entertainment
provides
to
you
allow
you
to
build
your
career
as
fast
or
as
slow
as
you
wish.

Whether
you
are
recording
your
first
song,
or
have
a
song
already
on
the
radio,
(as
you
will
learn)
Conquer
will
always
have
what
you
need
to
get
to
the
next
step.

Not
only
do
we
offer
services,
but
we
also
supply
you
with
trainings
on
each
aspect
of
your
business
to
help
you
further
reach
your
musical
goals.

You
will
soon
read
about
building
your
specific
plan,
and
exactly
what
you
need
to
do
each
day,
week
and
month
to
get
from
an
amateur
to
a
superstar
in
the
industry.

These
sections
will
also
outline
your
UnLabel
responsibilities
and
suggestions
as
to
how
to
build
your
UnLabel
for
unlimited
success
and
income.

So
enough
talking
about
it,
lets
get
into
the
steps
you
need
to
create
a
long‐lasting
career!



  7. 7. 7
MISSION
STATEMENT

Conquer
Entertainment
is
a
turn‐key
solution
for
an
artist
or
their
team
to
open,
own,
and
successfully
operate
an
independent
label
for
the
purpose
of
creating
music,
branding
artists,
building
a
music
career,
and
generating
income


CURRENT
INDUSTRY
–
THE
FACTS
• Recording
industry
in
world‐wide
CRISIS!

Music
sales
continue
to
drop;
20‐30%
in
2009.
• Music
downloads
are
taking
over
the
industry
(and
becoming
more
accessible
each
day).
• 90%
of
an
independent
artists
income
comes
from
10%
of
their
fans.
• 360
deals
are
deterring
artists
from
signing
to
labels.
• Record
labels
no
longer
offer
Artist
Development.

HOW
WE
(&
YOU)
ARE
REVOLUTIONIZING
THE
INDUSTRY...
Conquers
main
goal
is
to
integrate
a
new
system
that
will
dominate
(and
hopefully
replace)
the
current
record
industry
model.

By
becoming
an
UnLabel
owner,
you
have
technically
become
a
part
of
history.

No
other
company
offers
artists
the
financial
freedom,
creativity,
quality
services,
and
necessary
training;
giving
you
the
best
independent
option
for
artists
today.

Conquer
Entertainment
is
a
predominantly
online
company
–
meaning
we
mainly
focus
our
business
and
concept
to
the
online
market
and
industry.

Therefore,
we
are
ever‐changing,
updating
and
finding
new
ways
to
stay
up
to
speed
with
the
fast
moving
music
industry.

As
an
UnLabel
owner,
you
officially
own
an
online
label
that
you
can
do
whatever
you
want
with.

Conquer
Entertainment
doesnt
take
any
part
of
your
musical
creativity;
giving
you
complete
musical
freedom.

Since
Conquer
is
such
a
revolutionary
new
concept,
the
UnLabel
Admin
may
take
some
time
to
adjust
to
and
navigate
comfortably.

For
this
reason,
I
have
listed
step‐by‐step
instructions
on
how
to
get
around
each
section
of
your
online
administration
tool.



  8. 8. 8
USING
THE
CONQUER
ONLINE
ADMIN

(include
screenshots
for
each
step
in
each
section)

How
to
Sign
Up
(For
ULO
Package)
 Must
know
a
Conquer
Certified
Artist
Developer
(CAD)
to
sign
up

How
to
Sign
Into
Admin
 Signing
Into
Your
Account
 Getting
Into
Your
UnLabel
Admin



CONQUER
PRODUCTS
AND
SERVICES

Conquer
Entertainment
is
a
“dynamic”
company
–
which,
in
short,
means
we
are
always
evolving.

The
products
and
services
available
to
you
by
Conquer
are
designed
to
help
you
build
and
maintain
your
business,
and
always
keep
you
current
and
connecting
with
your
fans
and
customers.

Conquer
Entertainments
main
goal
is
to
make
YOU
a
success
by
giving
you
access
to
industry‐quality
partnerships
for
all
of
your
developing
needs.

You
have
the
following
services
at
your
disposal:

UnLabel
Subscription
Package:


Conquers
UnLabel
package
is
designed
to
give
the
artists
the
services
needed
to
build
and
sustain
a
career.

The
UnLabel
service
also
allows
for
the
artist
to
build
a
solid
and
successful
independent
label
by
duplicating
their
own
efforts
and
following
the
UnLabel
development
system.


Price
Breakdown:

$15/month
admin
fee



  9. 9. 9ULO
Services:
Recording
Music
Production
Mixing/Mastering
Photography
Video
Production
Graphic/Web
Design
Legal

Below
is
a
breakdown
of
each:

Recording
Quality
music
recording
–
The
recording
service
is
for
UnLabel
owners
who
need
to
record
a
“single”,
“EP”,
or
“LP”s
worth
of
material.

The
recording
facilities
that
Conquer
Entertainment
are
state‐of‐the‐art
and
have
a
solid
reputation
in
their
selected
genres.

As
an
artist,
you
can
take
advantage
of
this
service
in
several
hour‐blocks
if
you
wished.




Production

Industry
Producer
Beats
‐
The
producer
beat
database
is
for
UnLabel
owners
in
need
of
an
instrumental
song
to
write
lyrics
to.

The
exclusive
producers
whom
Conquer
Entertainment
have
partnered
with
are
very
frequently
used
in
the
entertainment
industry
and
have
been
on
national
radio.

They
are
very
talented,
creative
and
in
demand
musicians.

The
producer
beat
database
showcases
the
various
genres
and
colors
of
today’s
most
popular
music,
and
also
gives
detailed
information
on
the
producer,
so
you
know
the
person
whom
you
are
getting
music
from.








  10. 10. 10Engineering

Mixing/Mastering
‐
The
mixing
and
mastering
services
are
for
UnLabel
owners
who
have
demo
songs
recorded
and
need
a
professional
to
properly
mix
the
recording.

The
mixing
engineers
that
Conquer
Entertainment
uses
are
well
known
in
the
industry,
mostly
Grammy‐nominated,
and
excellent
at
their
craft.

The
engineers
have
done
work
for
such
artists
as
Jay‐Z,
No
Doubt,
Beyonce,
and
Kanye
West
to
name
a
few.

All
songs
that
go
through
Conquer
Entertainment’s
artist
download
platform
must
meet
Conquers
standards
and
qualifications.

How
To
Use
The
“Engineering”
Service:
Mixing/Mastering
–
whats
the
difference?
Mixing
is
the
adjustments
of
volume
levels,
FX,
room
sound,
and
panning
to
make
the
song
sound
well‐rounded
and
complete.

Mastering
is
the
adjustment
and
modification
of
a
“mixed
down”,
or
fully
mixed
song.

This
process
involves
tweaking
and
equalizing
specific
parts
of
the
entire
track
as
a
whole,
as
opposed
to
several
tracks
in
mixing.




How
to
use
both...
Mixing
should
be
done
for
every
song
you
plan
to
release.

Although
not
every
song
needs
mastering,
every
song
needs
a
professionally
mixed
version.

If
youre
planning
on
having
your
song
played
by
club
DJs
and
club
promoters,
then
it
must
be
mixed
at
least.

Mastering
adds
“clarity”
and
“sparkle”
to
the
mix,
and
really
makes
it
stand
out.

When
you
give
your
material
to
radio
Djs,
venues,
or
your
fans,
you
want
to
have
your
song(s)
mastered.

The
better
it
sounds,
the
more
people
will
talk
about
it!


Video

The
basic
video
service
is
for
UnLabel
owners
who
want
to
make
a
basic
music
video,
film
small
live
performances,
or
make
promotional
videos.




  11. 11. 11Photography

The
basic
photography
package
is
for
UnLabel
owners
who
want
candid
photos
for
a
press
kit
or
other
promotional
material.



Graphic/Web
Design
The
graphic
and
web
designers
with
Conquer
Entertainment
have
years
of
experience
in
developing
and
designing
websites
involving
Flash,
video
and
picture
embedding,
custom
template
building,
and
custom
widget
integration
(for
YouTube
videos,
Twitter
and
Facebook
feeds,
music
players,
etc.).


Logo
Design
–
Getting
a
logo
designed
by
the
graphic
design
team
with
Conquer
is
a
three‐step
process.

Before
contacting
the
design
team,
be
sure
to
have
an
idea
of
what
you
want
the
logo
to
look
like.



Purchasing
through
your
UnLabel
Admin

Step
One:
Submit
design
ideas
to
Conquer
design
team

Step
Two:
Choose
a
design
from
the
three
samples
given
(make
modifications
during
this
step)
Step
Three:
Choose
a
final
design
that
perfectly
represents
you
and
your
“brand”.



Note:
You
get
a
total
of
three
(3)
sample
logo
designs
and

two
(2)
re‐designs.



Promo
Flier/Poster
Design
For
Show

This
is
used
for
promotion
of
an
upcoming
show
or
event
that
you
are
performing.

This
flier
should
include:
• Date
• Venue
Name
and
Address
• Time
(for
Doors)
• Cover

  12. 12. 12• Age
Limit
(All,
18
+,
21
+)
• Headlining
Band/Artist
Name
(and
picture
if
able)
• Other
Acts
Names

Merchandising
Service
The
providers
for
your
“brand/artist
merch”
offer
quality
screen
printed
products
in
a
variety
of
sizes,
colors,
and
designs.

Use
yourConquer
Reward
Ponts
to
select
the
perfect
amount
for
whatever
show
or
event
you
are
doing.

Choose
from
items
such
as:
 Apparel
(T‐Shirts,
Hoodies,
Tanktops,
V‐Necks)


The
quantity
amount
that
Conquer’s
merch
providers
offer
can
accommodate
the
smallest
show
to
the
national
tour.

The
amounts
are
as
small
as
25
to
as
large
as
1,000
or
more.



2.2
Conquer
Rewards

Conquer
Rewards
can
be
thought
of
as
the
“lifeline”
of
your
UnLabel
career.

They
give
you
access
to
Conquer
Entertainment’s
services
in
exchange
for
a
set
reward
point
(CR)
amount.


Conquer
Reward
Accrual

There
are
several
ways
that
you
can
earn
Conquer
Rewards
with
your
UnLabel:

1.

Music
Download
Purchases
(.25
CR)
3.

ULO
Custom
Merchandise
Purchases
(CR
points
vary
per
product)

As
A
ULO,
it
is
important
that
you
understand
how
to
use
the
CR
points
&
services
to
build
your
career.

The
first
step
would
be
to
determine
where
you
are
in
your
career
and
analyze
your
current
situation
as
an
artist.

To
start
off,
fill
out
the
following
section:

  13. 13. 13
Established
Brand/Image
(main
“style”):______________________________________
Album/Single/Demo
Sales:________________________________
Number
of
Fans
Combined
(Myspace,
Facebook,
Mailing
List,
etc.):__________________________
“Single”
Video/Promo
views
(Youtube,
Ustream,
etc.):_________________________________
Number
of
Performances
(for
audiences
10‐100):_______________________
Number
of
“Big”
acts
opened
for:______________________________________
Current
Venue
“Draw”
(amount
of
fans
you
can
get
to
a
show):_____________________________

Now
that
you
have
an
idea
of
where
you
are,
you
can
read
the
following
sections
to
determine
what
to
do
to
get
you
where
you
want
to
be.

The
next
few
sections
will
break
down
your
career
as
an
artist
from
“start‐to‐established”,
and
giving
you
pointers
and
fill‐in‐the‐blanks
along
the
way
to
help
you
better
build
an
established
and
successful
UnLabel.


Stage
One:
No
music
recorded

If
you
have
no
music
recorded,
the
best
use
of
your
Conquer
Rewards
would
be
to
record
a
song
or
two.

Dont
pick
just
any
song!

Work
with
your
manager
and/or
CAD
to
choose
the
best
song
that
works
for
you
and
the
image
you
want
to
project.

Use
the
following
services
to
get
yourself
started:

 Production

 Mixing
 Recording

 MARKETING
PLAN


  14. 14. 14You
may
also
want
to
establish
an
online
presence
once
your
image
is
defined.

Stage
Two:

No
Internet
presence

If
you
already
have
music
recorded,
the
best
use
of
your
Conquer
Rewards
would
be
to
get
it
mixed/mastered
if
not
already,
and
establish
an
online
presence.

You
can
do
this
by:

 Creating
a
Facebook/Twitter/Youtube
or
other
Social
Networking
account
 Developing
a
press
kit
(using
Photography
Service)
 Uploading
mixed/mastered
music
to
your
UnLabel



Stage
Three:

No
Promotion

If
you
already
have
your
music
mixed
and
mastered,
and
have
a
significant
following
on
Facebook,
Twitter,
and
other
social
networking
sites,
its
time
to
start
promoting
yourself
heavily.

Some
ways
to
accomplish
this
are:

 Uploading
mixed/mastered
music
to
your
UnLabel
 Touring
locally/nationally
(using
Conquer
Touring
System)
 Establish
a
unique
and
memorable
performance
ideas/acts
 Make
merchandise/use
promotional
tools
(using
Merchandising
Service)
 
Start
advertising
&
promoting
your
“artist
brand/image”


Getting
Started:

Starting
Your
UnLabel
Career


 If
you
are
a
“new
artist”,
or
consider
yourself
new
to
the
industry,
then
the
first
thing
you
would
need
to
do
is
brand
yourself
as
a
person
and
artist.



ASK
YOURSELF:
How
do
you
want
the
world
to
know
you?

Who
do
you
want
them
to
see?

What
do
you
want
them
to
think
when
they
think
of

  15. 15. 15you?

What
are
your
fans
like?

The
answers
to
these
questions
determine
the
path
your
career
will
take
as
well
as
measure
the
level
success
you
would
like
to
reach.



One
of
the
most
important
areas
that
a
new
artist
must
establish
is
their
"image".

An
image
defines
your
music
before
it
is
even
heard.

Someone
should
be
able
to
get
a
feel
for
your
music
just
by
looking
at
you.

So
how
do
you
start
developing
an
image?

The
first
step
to
a
memorable
image
is
a
goal
statement.

You
have
to
know
where
you
are
going
before
you
actually
get
there!

The
next
few
sections
will
describe
how
to
correctly
develop
and
adjust
a
goal
statement
for
your
musical
career.

1.1
Goal
Statements


 Where
do
you
see
yourself
in
ten
years?

In
five
years?

Next
month?

Goals
are
a
great
way
to
pinpoint
where
you
are
and
where
you
want
to
go
in
your
career.

They
are
especially
important
when
developing
a
career
in
the
entertainment
world.

To
get
started,
you
should
first
get
to
know
you
as
an
artist.

Ask
yourself
these
questions
(honestly):

 What
do
you
want
to
achieve
in
your
musical
career?

 How
many
fans
do
you
see
yourself
having?

 What
types
of
magazines
do
you
see
yourself
in?

 What
countries
do
you
see
yourself
being
biggest?

 How
many
awards
do
you
see
yourself
winning?

 How
do
you
see
your
legacy
and
career
being
remembered?

After
you
have
reached
an
answer,
ask
yourself:


  16. 16. 16 Where
am
I
now?
 Set
dates
(estimated)
 Determine
smaller
goals
(set
realistic
dates
for
each)

Breaking
down
your
big
goals
into
smaller
goals
makes
it
easier
to
set
deadlines
for
your
success.

Constructing
a
SWOT
analysis
can
also
contribute
to
further
defining
your
goals.

A
SWOT
analysis
is
a
strategic
planning
method
used
to
evaluate
the
strengths,
weaknesses,
opportunities
and
threats
involved
in
a
particular
project
or
business
endeavor.

To
create
a
SWOT
analysis
for
yourself
and
your
career,
answer
these
questions
as
honest
and
detailed
as
possible:


 Strengths
 What
are
your
best
qualities?
 What
sets
you
apart
from
other
artists?
 What
do
you
do
differently
in
your
talent
that
puts
above
your
competition?
 What
sets
you
apart
from
others
as
a
performer?


 Weaknesses
 What
aspects
of
your
career
can
you
improve?


 Opportunities
 
 What
performances
have
you
done
to
help
you
further
your
career?
 What
are
your
connections
in
the
industry
and
who
do
they
know
that
you
could
build
a
relationship
with?
 What
are
you
doing
for
social
networking
(online
and
one‐to‐one)
to
get
your
name
and
music
to
the
world?


 Threats
 What
specific
industry
changes
can
have
an
impact
on
your
career?
 What
are
the
personal
threats
that
could
affect
your
career?
 What
are
you
doing
in
your
career
to
prepare
for
those
changes?

How?

  17. 17. 17
Once
you
have
narrowed
down
your
goals
into
specific
categories,
you
want
to
break
them
down
further
into
daily,
weekly,
and
monthly
tasks
to
help
you
better
develop
a
clear
path
to
follow
and
make
routine.

Finally,
ask
yourself:

 What
do
I
have
to
do
to
give
up
or
overcome
to
get
myself
to
the
next
level
of
success?

This
answer
should
be
clear
and
concise,
and,
if
you
answered
the
previous
questions
honestly,
it
should
be
easy
to
pinpoint
exactly
what
you
need
to
work
on
to
achieve
your
goal.



The
next
step
towards
becoming
a
successful
artist
is
believing
you
already
are
one.

Take
a
moment
to
write
down
answers
to
the
following
questions
(honestly):

Stage
Name:___________________________________________

Genre(s)
of
Music:____________________________________________

Location:_____________________________________________

Describe
your
music
in
one
word:_____________

Whats
your
target
demographic?:___________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________

Target
Radio
Station(s):___________________________________________________



  18. 18. 18Some
of
your
inspiration(s):_______________________________________________

What
is
it
about
your
inspirations
that
makes
you
like
them
so
much?
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________


(NOTE:

The
following
information
was
taken
from
the
book,
"The
Rockstar
In
You",
by
John
Battaglia,
Jr.)
WHAT
IT
TAKES
TO
MAKE
A
“ROCKSTAR”:

ROCKSTARS
generally
have
the
following
characteristics:

1.

An
incredible
sense
of
self
expression.
2.

Love
what
they
do.
3.

Have
a
"signature"
style.
4.

Their
own
greatness.
They
put
it
out
there,
no
holds
barred.
5.

Have
built
their
image.


6.

Seem
fearless.

Make
no
mistake:
Rockstars
have
fear
like
everybody
else.
but
the
difference
is
they
dont
let
it
hold
them
back
7.

Live
passionately.


What
thing
about
you
makes
you
unique
and
successful?
____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

  19. 19. 19
How
do
others
view
you?
______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

After
you
have
figured
out
the
answer
to
these
questions,
you
need
to
make
it
a
reality.

An
image
is
the
fullest,
most
intelligently
packaged,
outward
expression
of
your
inner
gifts.

It
is
the
doorway
that
people
use
to
get
an
impression
of
you.

People
dont
get
an
impression
from
you.

They
get
an
impression
from
the
image
you
project.

Therefore,
lets
work
on
your
image
now
that
we
have
down
what
you
honestly
think
about
yourself
and
the
image
you
project
to
others.



What
would
you
consider
your
"signature
style"?

Everyone
successful
has
a
"style"
or
charisma
about
them.

Whats
yours?

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Ask
yourself:

Is
your
look
telling
a
story
and
conveying
a
distinct
point
of
view?



If
so,
were
halfway
there
to
perfecting
it!

If
not,
were
halfway
there
to
finding
what
does!

Creating
your
"signature"
isnt
like
defusing
a
bomb!
It’s
a
simple
thing
to
accomplish.
All
that
is
needed
is
some
time
to
flip
through
magazines,
find

  20. 20. 20what
grabs
your
attention,
and
use
that
to
work
on
an
image
for
yourself.



Style
is
formed
when
you
consistently
put
forth
one
clear,
compelling
direction.



There
are
three
simple
steps
to
getting
your
"style":

1.

Educate
yourself
‐
the
first
step
is
to
start
noticing
what
youre
drawn
to.

The
key
is
to
all
of
this
is
to
educate
yourself
so
that
you

can
dictate
your
own
style.

2.

Create
your
direction
by
uncovering
your
imaging
themes.

3.

Illustrate
your
"style
direction"


Spend
time
identifying
the
defining
characteristics
in
the
rockstars
you
most
admire.

Dig
deep
within
yourself
and
find
what
makes
you
unique.



What
themes
best
define
the
celebrities
you
admire?_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

What
are
some
themes
that
best
define
you?

______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
  21. 21. 21_____________________________


When
youve
decided
upon
some
themes
for
yourself,
circle
your
top
three
and
build
your
image
around
them.

Whatever
themes
you
wrote
down
that
best
fit
how
you
view
yourself
and
how
others
view
you,
match
the
theme
with
a
look.



A
simple
way
to
do
this
is
to
go
through
some
styles
in
magazines
and
pick
out
what
you
think
best
conveys
one
(or
all
three)
of
your
themes.

Getting
used
to
understanding
what
you
are
attracted
to
and
the
look
you
like
makes
it
easier
to
change
your
image
throughout
your
career.

If
you
pick
honestly,
your
image
will
always
represent
you.

Your
edge
is
what
people
will
remember.


Another
tip
that
will
help
you
further
develop
an
image
for
yourself
is
to
create
a
"book
of
looks".

This
simply
means
going
through
magazines
or
window
shopping
for
looks
that
describe
one
of
your
themes
‐
and
then
separating
the
cut
outs
into
sections.



For
example,
have
a
section
for:

 Shirts
 Pants
 Hairstyles
 make
up
 Facial
hair,
etc.



Pick
only
what
is
true
to
you
and
the
image/theme
you
are
going
for.

By
doing
this,
you
will
always
have
choices
in
terms
of
imaging
and
will
be
able
to
"reinvent"
yourself
whenever
you
feel
is
right.





  22. 22. 22LOGO/BRANDING/SITE
“MATCHING”

When
developing
a
logo
for
yourself,
consider
your
branding
“themes”,
“signature
style”
and
“look”
that
you
are
going
for.

All
of
those
play
a
factor
in
developing
the
perfect
logo
to
represent
YOU,
so
it
is
important
to
have
a
clear
picture
of
your
“brand”
before
you
start
designing.

You
can
use
the
“Graphic/Web
Design”
service
to
get
started
designing
your
“image”
into
a
“unique
logo”.

They
will
design
three
different
logo
styles,
and
all
you
have
to
do
is
pick
the
one
that
matches
you
best,
and
tweak
and
modify
from
there.

Once
you
have
decided
on
a
logo,
you
must
MAKE
EVERYTHING
MATCH!

Whatever
colors,
style,
and/or
energy
your
logo
represents,
your
social
sites,
website,
merchandise,
and
persona
MUST
MATCH
as
well!

This
is
the
only
way
you
will
stay
consistently
current
and
easily
found.

Establishing
a
brand
and
logo
that
is
perfect
and
true
to
you
also
allows
you
to
evolve
and
change
depending
on
the
“theme”
or
“look”
you
want.






















  23. 23. 23Some
branding
examples:

ARTIST
 FROM
 TO
50
Cent
(Rapper)

Brand:
“Street”
to
“Business”






Justin
Timberlake
(Singer/Performer)

Brand:
“Boyband
Pop”
to
“Stylish
R&B/Pop”

 

  24. 24. 24
 
Christina
Aguilera
(Singer/Performer)

Brand:
“Cute/Innocent”
to
“Sexy/Dominating”







  25. 25. 25Gwen
Stefani
(No
Doubt)

Brand:
“Punk
Pop”
to
“Hip
Hop/Dynamic”




Madonna
(Singer/Performer)

Brand:
“Sexy/Innocent”
to
“Sexy/Relevant”

 

  26. 26. 26














  27. 27. 27
With
each
BRAND
EXAMPLE,
you
can
see
the
evolution
from
one
“theme”
to
the
next,
especially
with
Madonna
and
Gwen
Stefani.


Keep
in
mind
when
building
your
brand
to
make
your
“theme”
instantly
recognizable.

With
each
of
the
previous
examples,
you
immediately
get
a
sense
of
what
the
artist
sounds
like
just
from
the
album
art
and
promotional
photos
surrounding
it.

The
key
to
being
a
successful
artist
lies
in
your
“true”
brand
and
youre
ability
to
stay
current
and
still
true
to
you
and
your
“brand
image”.


DEVELOPING
A
MARKETING
PLAN


Parts
to
an
established
Marketing
Plan
Now
we
will
get
into
developing
a
full
marketing
plan
for
you
as
an
artist.

We
already
got
the
hard
part
out
of
the
way
(which
was
developing
an
brand
and
image,
and
listing
your
detailed
short
term
and
long
term
goals),
so
now
it’s
just
a
matter
of
placing
them
in
the
right
areas.

After
you’ve
narrowed
down
your
brand
and
“style”,
you
have
to
create
a
mission
statement
that
fully
encompasses
your
vision
and
impression
you
will
make
in
the
music
world.



MISSION
STATEMENT
Your
mission
statement
should
include
some
“themes”
that
you
used
to
describe
yourself
(and
why),
your
music
genre(s),
what
makes
you
unique
in
your
“style”,
and
your
ultimate
goal
for
yourself
and
your
musical
career.



BACKGROUND
This
section
should
give
a
detailed
biography
of
how
you
as
an
artist
(or
band)
started
your
musical
career,
highlighting
any
achievements
(if
any)
made
along
the
way.

This
section
should
also
give
the
reader
a
sense
that
they
understand
fully
where
you
came
from,
what
you
have
accomplished
so
far,
and
where
you
plan
on
going.

If
you
have
been
on
any
local
events
or

  28. 28. 28festivals,
it
would
be
good
to
mention
them
here.



Purpose
and
Objectives

This
section
should
list
your
“short
term”
goals
and
what
you
are
doing
in
your
career
each
day,
week
or
month
to
reach
the
goals
you
set.

A
simple
paragraph
will
do
(since
you
will
be
going
through
each
goal
in
detail
throughout
the
rest
of
the
plan).

You
also
want
to
explain
why
you
need
to
reach
these
goals
and
how
they
will
affect
your
“big
picture”.


Environmental
Analysis
External
analysis
This
section
should
go
over
the
current
society
and
culture
that
you
live
in.

There
are
external
factors
that
you
may
not
realize
that
would
have
an
impact
on
your
success.

(i.e.:
.
This
type
of
fact
would
go
in
the
“Technology”
Section:
The
US
recording
industry
is
currently
on
a
decline
as
downloads
rise
and
are
quickly
replacing
CDs.

Their
resistance
to
“change
with
the
times”
is
actually
a
benefit
for
other
independent
artists
trying
to
make
it
on
their
own
since
there
is
a
bigger
gap
of
opportunity
that
didn’t
exist
before.)

 Business
 Technology
 Overall
Economics


Macro
Environment
This
section
focuses
in
on
more
specific
advances
or
changes
within
your
environment
that
can
have
an
impact
on
your
career
(i.e.
technology
advancements,
social
networking
“boom”)
and
how
you
plan
on
combating
them
and
turning
them
into
successes.



 Explain
current
trends:
 Cultural
 Social
 Internet
 Music

  29. 29. 29

Demographics
–
Social
and
cultural
This
section
should
describe
your
existing
fan
base
in
detail
(location,
age,
gender,
etc).

This
information
can
be
found
using
Google
Analytics,
Yahoo
Analytics,
or
Facebook
Analytics.

It
should
also
be
easy
to
determine
if
you
are
in
constant
interaction
with
your
fans.

Checking
your
“stats”
on
sites
such
as
Facebook,
Youtube,
Myspace,
etc.
will
give
you
a
clear
picture
of
your
fans’
location
(and
specific
state/city
if
applicable),
age,
gender,
and
possibly
even
hobbies.



Political
Analysis
This
section
should
go
over
the
political
factors
that
could
have
an
effect
on
your
musical
career
–
i.e.
piracy,
industry
changes
in
royalty
percentages,
licensing
changes,
etc),
and
how
you
plan
on
dealing
with
them.
Also
include
organizations
or
associations
that
support
independent
musicians.

Economic
Analysis
This
section
should
go
over
the
current
music
industry’s
changes
(i.e.
online
downloads,
high
ticket
prices,
music
recording
industry
drastically
changing),
as
well
as
cosmetics,
film,
and
other
industries.

Technological
Analysis
This
section
should
go
over
the
technology
trends
and
advancements
that
would
impact
you
(i.e.
mobile
media,
ring‐tones,
blogs,
online
distribution,
wallpapers,
online
labels,
etc.)

Market
Analysis
For
this
section,
you
need
to
define
your
target
market
and
percentage
of
people
that
account
for
your
genre.

You
should
include
the
age
of
your
customer
base,
as
well
as
distribution
(in
store),
and
concert
trends
and
sales
(i.e.
ticket
prices).



  30. 30. 30Competition
Analysis
This
should
highlight
artists
similar
to
your
“style”
and
“genre”,
and
what
makes
you
thrive
over
your
existing
competition

Management
and
Staff
This
should
give
specific
roles
and
names
of
your
current
“team”
and
their
background
in
the
industry
or
their
field.

This
sections
should
also
describe
team
members
you
are
lacking,
and
what
your
current
team
members
are
doing
to
help
further
your
career.

Break
down
your
team’s
specific
roles:
 Producer
 Engineer
 Manager
 Lawyer*
 Booking
Agent
 Video

 PR

Marketing
Mix
Strategies

Product
and
Price
This
section
should
highlight
what
makes
your
“brand”
special.

This
should
also
answer
the
questions:
 What
albums
have
you
released?

What
was/is
the
price?
 What
reviews
have
been
done?
o Magazines,
blogs,
etc.
 What
online
“singles”
are
available?
o Where
and
for
how
much?
 Merchandise
o Physical
and
digital
–
specifics
(i.e.
shirts,
hats,
desktop,
wallpapers,
etc.)
 Videos
o Director/Budget
spent

  31. 31. 31
Distribution
and
Retail
This
section
should
describe
where
your
distribution
and
retail
focus
will
be,
and
should
also
address
if
it
will
be
digital
or
physical,
as
well
as
where
and
how
it
will
be
distributed
(i.e.
online,
in
store,
exact
names
and
locations).

This
should
also
explain
other
means
of
distribution
for
the
following:
 One
to
One
(where
and
how)
 Mobile
o Applications/ringtones/distribution
 Street
Team
o What
role
will
they
play
in
the
distribution
process
(for
physical
and
online)?
o What
promotional
merchandise
will
they
receive?

Publicity
This
section
will
explain
where
your
press
kit
will
be
distributed
and
how
it
will
be
used.

It
should
also
explain
what
particular
press
(magazines,
local
papers,
websites,
blogs,
“targeted”
markets)
will
be
given
the
press
kit,
and
go
over
the
key
messages
and
objectives
for
your
specific
media
targets.

A
social
calendar
of
events
should
also
be
kept
to
track
upcoming
events
and
press
opportunities.

To
better
define
your
specific
target
press,
you
should
create
a
target
media
outreach
list.

This
includes
the
outlet
and/or
magazine
name,
metric
value
(how
many
people
reached)
and
genre
(music,
lifestyle,
teen,
women,
etc.).

If
you
don’t
know
the
metric
value
of
the
magazines
you
are
“targeting”,
you
can
call
the
magazine
directly
and
ask
for
their
rate
card
or
circulation
numbers.

Also
included
in
this
section
would
be
any
current
and/or
past
press
and
publicity,
detailing:
 Magazine
Name,
article,
and
issue
date
 Any
articles
(interviews/blog
mentions/links)
 Media
events
attended
 Future/Planned
events


  32. 32. 32Video
This
will
outline
how
your
video
will
be/is
used
for
promotional
purposes
(i.e.
media
outlets/targets)

Street
Team
This
will
describe
the
detailed
efforts
to
create
a
street
team.
If
one
already
exists
(locally),
then
outline
duties
that
street
team
captains
and
promo
efforts
for
promoting
poster
target
areas,
how
to
use
CDs
for
promo,
how
to
use
flyers,
merch,
passes
to
promote
artist
and
upcoming
shows.


Online/Viral
This
section
should
highlight
the
promotional
plan
for
all
of
your
online
sites
that
help
increase
your
fan
base,
merch
sales,
and
shows.

Social
sites
include:
 Myspace
 Reverb
Nation
 YouTube
 Facebook
 Blogger
 Chatterbox
 Google
Ranking

Radio
This
section
should
explain
your
radio
promotion
plan
for
local,
internet,
terrestrial,
college,
and/or
satellite
radio
stations.

Your
target
stations
should
include
genre
as
well
as
locations
(Philly,
LA,
etc.).

Next,
you
should
list
the
specific
action
plan
for
each
radio
station.

Tour
This
section
goes
over
your
touring
plans
to
create
more
shows
and
local
buzz
for
yourself.

Details
should
include
geographic
area(s),
show
amount,
and
acquiring
a
booking
agent
(if
needed).




  33. 33. 33Promotional
Merchandise
This
section
should
go
over
the
current
merchandise
“inventory”
and
promo
materials
(such
as
flyers,
posters,
widgets,
downloadable
materials,
etc.)
used
to
promote
shows
and
other
events
and/or
appearances.

Additional
Opportunities
This
section
should
explain
future
performances,
press
opportunities,
or
other
events
that
you
have
planned
that
will
play
a
role
in
creating
more
promotion
for
your
“brand”
and
career.



ESTABLISHING
A
TEAM:

After
youve
completed
your
detailed
marketing
plan,
the
next
step
would
be
to
organize
a
team
of
partners
(manager,
booking
agent,
lawyer,
music
producer
(optional))
whom
you
trust
and
share
the
same
goal
of
success.

Below
is
a
list
of
common
jobs
and
tasks
expected
of
the
following
industry
“team”
personnel.


MANAGER
 • Assist
in
song
selection
• Assist
in
studio
etiquette
• Advise
and
counsel
talent
• Assist
in
decision
making
• Brand/Image
assistance
• Website/Graphic/Logo
assistance
◦ Accurately
representing
artist
• Finding
a
Publicist/PR
◦ Assist/organize
Promotion/Marketing
campaigns
• Handling
Money
and
Finances
• Assist
in
finding
producers,
writers,
etc.

  34. 34. 34• Assist
in
Street
Team
Development
◦ Help
develop
a
fan
base
• Develop
Press
Kits
◦ E‐Kits,
traditional
paper
press
kits,
one
sheets
• Assist
in
merchandising
decisions
◦ Stickers,
clothing
promo
material
• Assist
in
song
or
CD
release
dates
• Obtain
a
publishing
deal
(ASCAP/BMI/SESAC)
• Find
a
photographer
for
photo
shoots
◦ Candid/press/live
• Find
music
distributors
(online
and/or
in‐store)
• Paid
on
commission
(10‐20%
normally)
PRODUCER
 • Compose
and
arrange
music
for
artist
• Hire
musicians
and
engineers
for
session
(if
needed)
• Assist
in
song
choices
to
record
• Monitor
the
recording
budget
• Understand
recording/production
process
• Proficient
in
DAW
program
of
choice
(Pro
Tools,
Logic,
Fruity
Loops,
etc.)
• Control
day‐to‐day
recording

  35. 35. 35operations
• Work
with
and
captain
musicians
• Book
studio
time
(optional)
• Listen
to
and
fine
tune
recorded
music
• Choose
song
order
of
album
• Charge
per
song/project
◦ Occasionally
get
a
percentage
of
artist
record
sales
(if
in
contract)
PUBLICIST/PR
 • Get
positive
press
for
artist
• Create
and
maintain
relationships
◦ with
Journalists,
taste‐makers,
bloggers,
etc.
• Write
and
send
out
press
releases
• Arrange
appearances
• Create
media
opportunities
• Handle
interview
requests
for
artist
• Organize
press
tours
• Network
with
journalists
and
other
media
personnel
• Create
press
kit
◦ Write
bio,
select
pictures,
help
organize
performance
resume,
assist
in
cover
letter
• Paid
flat
fee
LAWYER
 • Create
and
negotiate
contracts
• Paid
hourly
or
by
commission
(5‐10%)

  36. 36. 36BOOKING
AGENT
 • Researches
the
potential
venues
for
your
act
• Negotiates
with
venue
to
get
performances
with
a
“draw”
(amount
of
fans
coming
to
a
given
show)
• Contract
negotiation
• Show
scheduling
• Paid
on
commission
(5‐10%
of
each

performance
gross
and/or
percentage
of
merchandise
sales)




CONTRACTS/AGREEMENTS

Manager/Artist
contracts
commonly
list:
• Commission
negotiation
(10‐20%
of
overall
income)
 Percentage
of
artist
income
to
manager
• Plans/Deadlines
for
high
priority
goals
 Decisions
reached
mutually
by
both
Artist
and
Manager
• Duration
of
contract
agreement
(i.e.
expires
in
1
year,
6
months,
etc.)

Tour
Contracts
(outside
of
Conquer)
commonly
list:
• Date
of
Agreement
‐
"An
agreement
between
x
and
y”
• Date
and
Time
agreed
to
perform
show
• Description
of
services
supplied
• What’s
already
provided
by
the
venue
in
terms
of
equipment,
crew,
etc.)
• Venue
and
show
date
• Venue
Name
and
scheduled
date
and
time
of
performance
• Capacity

  37. 37. 37• Venue’s
Audience
Limit
• Ticket
Price
• Agreed
ticket
price
for
patrons
and
split
percentages
• Fee
Payment
Schedule
• Agreed
fee
to
be
paid
for
performance
• Production
Requirements

• What’s
required
from
Artist
for
Venue
to
have
successful
event

Tour
Riders
(Breakdown
of
specific
details
of
tour)
• Expenses
of
the
Tour
Promoter
• Ticket
selling
policies
(including
complimentary
tickets
and
how
they
will
be
handled)
• Billing
rights
for
Headline
(signs
and
publicity)
• Equipment
breakdown
(what
will
be
rented
by
promoter
compared
to
whats
being
brought
by
band)
• Breakdown
of
local
crew
needed
to
be
assigned/hired
• Dressing
rooms,
security,
travel,
and
catering

• Cancellation
policies

Standard
Contract
agreements
commonly
list:
• Date
of
agreement

• Description
of
“events”
or
“contractual
agreement
terms”
• Split
percentage
(if
any)
and/or
other
monetary
amounts
agreed
upon
• Signature
from
BOTH
PARTIES
• Duration
of
contract
(i.e.
expiration/renewal
date)


DEVELOPING
A
“SINGLE”
Using
the
“Recording”
service
If
you
want
to
take
your
career
a
song
at
a
time,
use
the
“Recording
Service”
to
get
your
songs
from
“demo”
to
“downloadable”.

You
can
record,
mix
and

  38. 38. 38master
your
material
with
your
Conquer
Reward
points.

Using
the
“Production”
service
If
you
don’t
want
to
produce
your
material,
or
simply
want
to
add
diversity
to
your
music
and
“brand”,
you
can
use
the
“Production
Service”
to
select
a
song
perfect
for
your
musical
direction.

Just
choose
a
beat
and
start
writing!

Choosing
a
“Single
Theme”/Using
“Graphic
Design”
Once
you’ve
completed
your
song
and
have
a
finished,
mastered
product,
you
can
begin
designing
a
“theme”
to
surround
the
“feel”
of
your
song
“single”.

If
you
focus
on
the
song’s
subject
in
some
way,
you
can
easily
decide
an
image
and
feel
that
matches
the
artwork.

DEVELOPING
A
“EP/LP/ALBUM”
Songwriting
There
are
many
advantages
to
writing
your
own
music
as
an
artist.

You
have
complete
control
over
the
melody,
harmony,
structure,
and
instrumentation,
as
well
as
a
product
that
you
can
call
your
own
once
its
finished.

As
an
UnLabel
owner,
technically
all
you
have
to
worry
about
is
the
lyrics.

With
the
Music
Production
Service,
you
can
utilize
the
producer
database
to
find
the
perfect
style”
to
match
your
song.



Demoing
songs
Once
you
have
your
song
and/or
idea
finished,
you
can
record
a
rough
demo
with
a
four
track
recorder,
phone
recorder,
or
utilize
the
“recording”
service
to
get
a
structure
down.

This
can
give
you
an
idea
of
where
the
song
is,
if
it
needs
more
production
(or
something
else),
and
whether
or
not
to
continue
to
work
on
it.

Its
important
to
keep
in
mind
that
some
songs
sound
great
on
paper,
but
not
so
much
once
its
recorded.

You
want
to
be
careful
not
to
waste
too
many
of
your
reward
points
on
“recording”
unless
you
have
complete
song
ideas,
and
you
really
believe
the
song
has
potential.





  39. 39. 39Picking
songs
to
record
After
youve
established
some
songs
you
feel
really
good
about
and
want
to
further
produce,
use
the
“recording”
service
to
get
them
professionally
recorded.

You
can
also
use
the
“production”
service
to
put
a
finished
beat
behind
the
song,
and
then
go
and
get
the
vocals
recorded
over
it.





Organizing
a
tracklist
This
is
typically
an
engineers
job,
but
you
are
more
than
welcome
to
take
part
in
it
as
well.

This
process
involves
organizing
the
songs
in
a
way
that
they
“flow”
from
one
track
to
the
next,
and
keep
the
listener
engaged
and
entertained
from
start
to
finish.

Theres
no
“true”
method
to
it,
however,
the
most
common
procedures
are:

• The
album/EPs
“single”
song
is
placed
within
the
first
3
to
5
tracks
• “Exciting/Energetic”
songs
start
and
end
the
album/EP

Picking
a
“single”
The
album/EPs
“single”
should
be
a
song
that
not
only
YOU
feel
good
about,
but
your
FANS
and
FRIENDS
feel
good
about
as
well.

Not
all
“singles”
need
to
be
catchy,
poppy,
or
even
memorable,
but
they
all
need
to
be
liked
by
your
“audience”
in
order
to
truly
succeed.



Album
“Theme”
&
Artwork
Your
album
“theme”
should
match
your
“brand
image”
associated
with
your
look
and
style,
online
sites,
and
logo.

If
you
want
to
have
a
presence,
everything
you
do
as
an
artist
must
match
your
“brand”
that
you
built
for
yourself.



Physical
vs.
Online
distribution

Although
digital
downloads
are
all
the
rage,
physical
mediums
such
as
vinyl
and
CDs
are
still
favored
by
some
people.

This
is
not
to
say
that
these
formats
will
make
a
“comeback”,
but
it
is
good
to
cater
to
that
audience
if
it
suits
your
genre
and
style.

Many
major
and
independent
artists
still
print
some
7”
records
for
their
fans
to
collect
as
memorabilia.

Typically,
they

  40. 40. 40dont
print
over
one
or
two
thousand
simply
because
there
wouldnt
be
a
demand
for
more
than
that
amount.

As
an
UnLabel
owner,
your
fanbase,
customers,
and
business
partners
are
your
“distribution”
as
well
through
the
most
powerful
form
of
promotion
and
distribution
ever
–
word
of
mouth.



PLANNING
AN
“ALBUM/EP”
RELEASE
PARTY
Choosing
a
venue
There
are
many
avenues
to
take
when
choosing
where
to
have
your
album
release
party.

You
can
host
it
at
a
friends
house,
local
restaurant/bar/club,
or
perform
the
album
live
at
a
venue.

The
most
common
method
is
to
host
it
at
a
club,
but
live
is
also
favored
(for
the
fans).

Wherever
you
choose,
make
sure
its
a
comfortable
place
for
you
and
your
guests.



Who
to
invite
After
youve
completed
a
finished
product
you
are
happy
with,
the
next
step
would
be
to
plan
an
album
“release
date”
and
a
simultaneous
album
“release”
party.

These
normally
go
hand‐in‐hand,
and
features
the
artists
closest
friends,
business
partners,
and
tons
of
press
and
publicists.

Some
artists
also
invite
select
fans
and/or
street
team
members
as
a
thank
you
for
supporting
their
music.

Industry
personnel
should
also
be
invited,
such
as:

• Local
“taste‐makers”
• Popular
Bloggers
• Music
Reviewers
• Magazine
/E‐zine
Interviewers/Press
(appropriate
for
your
genre)
• Local
Music
NewsPapers/Magazines

What
to
perform
Without
question,
you
should
perform
your
album/EPs
“single”
and
two
others
you
feel
strongly
about.

Another
option
could
be
to
perform
your
entire
release
and
give
guests
a
sneak‐peek
to
your
new
material.

Some
artists
have
guests
perform
at
their
parties
as
well.

Again,
whatever
you
decide,
make
sure
it
will
be
liked
by
your
guests
as
well
as
yourself.

The
last
thing
you
want
is
bad
press
for
material
that
hasnt
even
been
officially

  41. 41. 41released
yet!

Promotion
and
Marketing

Use
e‐flyers,
fans,
existing
press
relationships,
social
networks,
promotional
material
(such
as
CDs,
mini‐posters,
exclusive
merchandise)
to
promote
the
upcoming
party,
giving
the
following
details:

• Album
CD
Cover
• DJ/Host
of
Event
• Time
• Location
• RSVP
(if
necessary)

PROMOTION/MARKETING/NETWORKING
NEW
MATERIAL

4
Ps
Of
Music
Marketing
Product
“Products”
for
an
artist
can
come
in
many
forms;
music,
merchandise,
and
your
“brand
image”.

Once
youve
picked
a
“single”
that
you
want
to
share
with
the
world,
(and
are
excited
about
it
most
importantly),
you
have
to
make
the
marketing
campaign
around
it
match
your
“brand
image”.

After
picking
a
“single”,
you
have
to
build
merchandise
to
support
the
“brand
image”
surrounding
the
“single”.

Some
examples
are:












  42. 42. 42


ARTIST
 LATEST“SINGLE”/CD
RELEASE
MERCHANDISE
EXAMPLE
Hanson
Pop/Rock
band

Shout
It
Out


Lady
GaGa
Pop
Singer/Songwriter
The
Fame


  43. 43. 43Eminem
Rapper
Recovery

Adam
Lambert
Pop/Glam‐Rock
Singer
For
Your
Entertainment





After
youve
appropriately
matched
your
“merchandise”
with
your
“brand
image,
you
have
three
products
you
can
sell
to
your
fans,
customers,
and
whoever
else
you
want!


Price/Quantity
• After
youve
designed
the
right
merchandise
“brand”
for
your
marketing
campaign,
you
have
to
decide
on
a
quantity
amount
depending
on
the
CR
amount
of
your
order.

(see
Section
Two)


Place
Next,
after
you
have
priced
your
merchandise
fairly
and
competitively,
you

  44. 44. 44have
to
find
places
to
sell
your
merchandise
at.

Some
good
locations
to
start
would
be:
• Weekly
show

• Online
store
• On
tour
via
merch
table
• Links/banners
to
“online
store”
on
Social
sites


These
are
just
a
few
examples
of
places
to
get
started
selling,
but
itd
be
best
to
use
your
own
imagination
and
come
up
with
a
solid
marketing
plan
and
campaign
to
get
the
most
out
of
your
“single”
release.




Promotion


One‐to‐one
marketing
is
the
most
powerful
form
of
marketing
and
promotion;
especially
in
an
artists
business.

Start
making
new
fans
by
carrying
your
“single”
around
everywhere
(whether
it
be
a
CD
or
mp3
on
your
phone)
–
or
carry
stickers
promoting
your
website
or
social
networking
sites
to
hand
out
as
an
alternative.
Ask
your
“potential
fans”
to
check
out
your
music
and
play
it
from
your
device,
and
follow
up
with
a
sticker
and
an
email
if
you
can
(for
your
mailing
list).

This
is
a
good
way
to
get
to
know
and
update
your
fan
base
and
establish
a
personal
connection.



Another
way
to
promote
your
“single”
is
through
existing
social
networks.

Promote
your
link
to
your
Conquer
Artist
page,
on
your
Facebook,
Myspace,
Reverb
Nation,
Twitter,
etc
and
share
it
with
all
your
friends
on
your
lists.

To
further
capitalize
on
your
fan
base,
you
can
obtain
emails
from
them
by
encouraging
them
to
join
your
mailing
list
(if
they
havent
already)
and
send
out
emails
asking
opinions
on
your
latest
“single”,
website
revamp,
upcoming
shows,
shows
theyve
seen,
etc.

Keep
them
involved
in
your
world
–
theyll
love
you
for
it!



Also,
being
that
Conquer
Entertainment
is
partnered
with
a
promotion
powerhouse
‐
Market
America
‐
promotion
is
the
easiest
part!

UnFranchise

  45. 45. 45owners
are
a
network
of
people
that
promote
(daily)
Market
America
products
and
services
that
they
take
a
liking
to.

Since
Market
America
is
Conquer
Entertainment’s
primary
source
of
distribution
and
promotion,
you
have
access
to
the
network
of
180,000
plus
distributors
all
over
the
globe
to
help
promote
the
sales
of
your
music.



Since
your
music
is
considered
a
"product"
within
Market
Americas
"Mall
Without
Walls",
any
music
you
upload
to
Conquer,
Market
America
distributors
and
their
customers
will
promote
for
you
if
you
generate
enough
interest
and
demand.
There
are
literally
thousands
of
people
waiting
to
hear
your
music
and
promote
it
to
others
‐
so
why
not
talk
about
it?

Use
the
following
MA
and
Conquer
Sites
to
promote:
 MATV
 Conquer
YouTube
 MA
Blog
 Conquer
Blog
 MA
Newsline
 MA
Powerline



NETWORKING/MARKETING

The
key
to
being
successful
at
networking
is
simple
‐
do
it
a
lot!

The
more
you
talk
to
people,
the
less
nervous
you
become
and
more
confidence
you
build.

Starting
a
conversation
‐
especially
about
something
you
love
comes
easier
the
more
you
do
it.

Next
time
youre
out,
simply
start
a
conversation
with
a
stranger.

A
simple
"Hello"
can
go
a
long
way!

Another
way
to
successfully
network
is
through
the
internet.
Sign
yourself
up
for
every
activity
you
think
is
interesting.


The
more
you
update
your
page,
the
more
people
will
take
notice.



The
social
media
outlets
that
exist
today
are:

  46. 46. 46
 Blogging/Micro
Blogging
 Podcasting
 Video
Blogging
 Message
Board
 Photo
Sharing

A
good
way
to
see
what
networking
activity
is
for
you
is
to
figure
out
what
best
categorizes
your
personality.

Out
of
the
four
categories
below,
pick
the
best
one
that
fits
you.

Interactive

Easy
Going/Relaxed

Talkative

Shy/Timid


Once
youve
established
which
category
you
best
fit,
its
time
to
take
a
look
at
what
social
networking
activities
might
fit
you
best.



Interactive

If
you
consider
yourself
to
be
"interactive",
then
social
networking
and
possibly
video
sharing
is
the
best
route
for
you.



Sites
like
YouTube,
Twitter,
and
Facebook
are
of
the
best
benefit.

With
these
sites
you
can:

 Choose
a
username/URL
(make
it
"sticky"
and
unique)
 Upload
pictures
(pick
a
recent
one)
 Update
"status"
(what
youre
doing
at
that
moment)

  47. 47. 47 Chat
with
"friends"
(either
by
instant
message
or
e‐mail)
 Change
profile
"theme"
(make
it
customized
to
YOU)
 Download/play
applications/games
(to
make
more
friends)
 Get
daily
updates
when
someone
views,
friends,
messages,
or
comments
on
your
profile


Easy
Going/Relaxed

If
you
consider
yourself
to
be
"easy
going",
then
social
messaging
such
as
micro‐blogging
may
be
the
best
route
for
you.

Sites
like
Twitter
allow
you
to:

 Post
a
few
words
to
a
sentence
on
your
"daily
news"
to
the
internet
world
 Post
pictures
and
music
to
share
with
your
"followers"
 "Follow",
or
add
people
to
your
list
to
get
their
recent
updates
 Make
and
check
"status
updates"
from
literally
anywhere
‐
there
are
hundreds
of
"twitter
friendly"
applications
for
various
mediums
(mobile,
computer,
web)

Talkative

If
you
consider
yourself
to
be
"talkative",
then
various
types
of
blogging
may
be
the
best
route
for
you.



Sites
like
Blogger,
LiveJournal,
and
YouTube
allow
you
to:

 Share
your
ideas,
stories,
and
recent
happenings
with
the
world
 Update
weekly,
monthly,
or
daily
‐
whatever
works
for
you
 Choose
a
template
or
layout
that
works
for
you
and
your
"topics"
 Have
"subscribers"
who
view
your
site
regularly
or
whenever
you
update
it

  48. 48. 48

Shy/Timid

If
you
consider
yourself
to
be
"shy",
then
photo
sharing
may
be
the
best
route
for
you.

Sites
like
Flickr,
Instagram,
and
Photobucket
allow
you
to:

 Upload
photos
or
images
from
your
computer
to
the
site
 Share
with
friends
on
Twitter,
Facebook,
etc.
 Post
image
on
website
or
social
networking
site
(code
is
provided)
 Separate
your
pictures
into
categories

Whatever
you
decide
to
go
with,
make
sure
you
are
consistent.

No
one
wants
to
visit
a
blog
that
hasnt
been
updated
in
months

Do
your
fans
a
favor
and
keep
whatever
social
media
outlet
you
choose
updated.

Post
your
personal
"URL"
for
your
sites
along
with
your
website
on
merchandise
and
hand
it
to
everyone
you
see.

It
comes
in
handy
later
on
when
you
want
to
get
booking
for
shows.

YOUR
FRIEND
AMOUNT
AND
PROFILE
VIEWS
MATTER!


Press
Kits


 The
first
part
of
organizing
a
successful
tour
is
to
have
a
professionally
done
press
kit
to
present
to
booking
agents
and
potential
venues.

A
traditional,
industry‐standard
press
kit
has
the
following
table
of
contents


 (at
minimum):

 Cover
and
cover
letter
 Brief
biography
 One
8x10
headshot
 Performance
resume

  49. 49. 49 Contact
page


Cover
and
Cover
Letter

 This
section
should
be
very
brief
(one
to
three
paragraphs)
explaining
you
as
an
artist,
highlight
your
current
achievements,
and
your
ultimate
reason
as
to
why
you
are
giving
them
your
press
kit;
whether
it’s
to
get
booked
for
a
show,
played
on
the
radio,
or
promoted
or
sponsored
by
a
company.

The
cover
letter
is
usually
written
by
the
artist’s
manager
or
consultant,
but
artists
themselves
can
write
it
too.

An
example
of
a
cover
letter
would
be:

UnLabeled
Entertainment
1234
East
23rd
Street,
Suite
232
New
York,
NY
10101
Phone/Fax:
212‐111‐1111



Jane
Doe
Lightning
Records
4321
Treble
Place
Los
Angeles,
CA
01234


July
12,
20XX

Dear
Jane:

As
the
personal
manager
of
the
New
York‐based
rock
band,
ULO,
I
have
enclosed
a
complete
press
package
and
demo
for
your
perusal.


The
band
is
currently
drawing
about
200
people
per
show
locally
and
is
being
played
on
WXET
and
WWFV
in
New
York.


  50. 50. 50
I
feel
their
songs
are
well‐constructed
and
radio
ready
and
value
your
professional
input.


Ill
give
you
a
call
in
a
few
days
to
be
sure
this
package
arrived.
Please
dont
hesitate
to
contact
me
should
you
need
further
information.
Thanks
in
advance
for
your
time
and
consideration.


Sincerely,

Aye
Bee‐Cee
ULO
Manager


Note:
It
is
plagiarism
to
copy
this
word‐for‐word,
so
write
something
like
it;
NOT
EXACT!


After
you
have
created
a
cover
letter
that
includes
all
of
the
above,
then
you
have
to
make
a
biography
(also
called
a
“one‐sheet”)
describing
your
past,
present
and
future
quickly
and
simply.

You
want
the
reader
to
listen
to
your
music
‐
not
read
your
life
story!



Biography

 A
brief
biography
usually
includes
an
introduction
to
you
as
an
artist
and
where
you
are
headed
in
your
career,
highlights
the
accomplishments
you
have
made
so
far
as
an
artist
and
the
name
you
have
made
(or
are
making)
for
yourself.

Your
bio
should
answer
all
the
immediate
questions
that
people
would
have
about
you
from
first
glance.


What
kind
of
music
do
you
do?

Where
are
you
from?

What
makes
you
unique?



 An
example
of
a
one‐sheet
would
be:

[Past]
 
 

 Rebellious.

Personal.

Edgy.

All
words
to
describe
alternative
rock
band


  51. 51. 51CALIBUR.

Formed
in
1994,
CALIBUR
is
the
perfect
blend
of
edgy,
grunge
rock

and
roll
and
raspy
classic
blues.

Starting
out
in
dive
bars
playing
to
crowds
of

twenty
people,
CALIBUR
quickly
established
a
name
for
themselves
after
their
song
“Love
Me
Here”
created
a
buzz.



[Present]
 

 CALIBUR
has
recently
played
at
such
events
as
2009
Talent
Fest,
a
local
festival
of
2500
people,

and
is
looking
to
expand
to
greater
audiences
and

 opportunities.

CALIBUR
also
has
plans
to
release
their
new
single
“Catch
Me”
late
fall
of
2009
exclusively
through
their
record
label,
IN
ZANE,
as
well
as
do
a
mini‐tour
to
support
the
release.



[Contact/Upcoming]

 Currently,
CALIBUR
can
be
contacted
via
their
website
at
www.caliburonline.com,
as
well
as
these
other
sites:


 Facebook.com/calibur

 machatterbox.com/calibur

 Conquerentertainment.com/calibur

Photos

 The
standard
size
for
an
appropriate
press
kit
photo
is
8X10.

The
photo
that
you
include
in
your
press
kit
should
be
the
perfect
visual
expression
of
you
and
your
image.


Include
two
to
four
other
photos
showcasing
your
various
artistic
styles.

Your
photo
goal
should
be
to
try
to
look
like
the
music
you
are
‐
separate
yourself
from
the
rest
of
the
press
kits
the
person
may
have
seen
earlier
that
week
(or
even
day)!

If
you
have
press
clippings,
articles,
or
mentions,
here
would
be
a
great
place
to
display
them.



Performance
Resume

 This
is
one
of
the
most
important
sections
because
it
illustrates
what
you
have
done
and
accomplished
as
an
artist
so
far.

If
you
don’t
have
any
performances
yet,
it
would
be
wise
to
use
the
event
service
and
start

  52. 52. 52booking
yourself
shows!

The
more
exposure
you
can
get,
the
better!

If
you
do
have
performances,
they
should
be
listed
in
this
format:

DATE
=
first
to
most
recent
TYPE/NAME
OF
EVENT
LOCATION
CROWD
SIZE
(if
applicable)

EX:
09/09/2009
‐
Barney’s
Rock
Show,
Buffalo,
NY
‐
250
people








09/23/2009
‐
2009
Talent
Festival,
Albany,
NY
‐
2,500
people

Contact
Page

 This
section
should
include
your
manager’s
contact
information,
or
yourself
if
you
do
not
have
a
manager.

Be
sure
to
only
give
information
that
is
checked
on
a
regular
basis.

The
last
thing
you
want
is
to
have
given
someone
the
wrong
information
and
them
not
being
able
to
contact
you!

An
example
of
a
good
contact
information
page
would
be:

Harvey
Doe
CALIBUR
Manager

Office:
423‐234‐9999
Email:
harvey@calibur.com
Website:
www.harveydoe.com

 


www.calibur.com

  53. 53. 53

If
you
consider
yourself
to
be
more
of
an
"internet"
artist,
you
can
create
a
one‐page
"e‐kit"
and
a
custom
domain/".com"
for
your
press
kit
for
people
to
go
to

‐
or
to
promote
yourself
more
easily
instead
of
worrying
about
getting
copies
professionally
printed.

A
one
page
"e‐kit"
would
include
the
following
information:
*Bio
(1‐2
paragraphs)
*3
tracks
(Minimum)
that
users
can
click
*Photo
Gallery
(4
photos
MAX‐
mix
live
and
candid
shots)
*Social
networking
links
*Performance
Resume/Upcoming
Events
*Press/Media
links

(example)









  54. 54. 54










Traditional
Press
Kit
 Electronic
Press
Kit
 One
Sheet
Press
Kit

 


  55. 55. 55



 



 

  56. 56. 56
Choosing
the
right
press
kit
“template”
Each
press
kit
design
has
a
particular
purpose.

A
traditional
press
kit,
for
example,
is
better
used
for
getting
gigs
and
venues
and
publicity,
where
are
a
“one
page”
press
kit
is
better
used
for
radioplay
and
club‐like
venues.

An
EPK
(electronic
press
kit)
can
serve
for
both
purposes
that
the
traditional
and
one
page
kit
do,
as
well
as
show
your
“audience”
samples
of
your
music,
social
networking
sites,
blogs,
and
so
on.

Whatever
template
you
decide
to
use,
make
sure
it
matches
the
“theme”
and
“brand
image”
you
have
throughout
your
websites,
social
sites,
artwork,
and
photo
shoots.

Making
everything
“match”
consistently
theme‐wise
is
essential
to
solidifying
an
unique
“brand”
for
yourself
and
your
music.


Once
you
have
a
professionally
worded
and
designed
press
kit,
it’s
time
to
start
promoting
yourself!

The
best
way
to
do
that
would
be
to
start
touring!



PERFORMING

To
further
build
your
fan
base
and
obtain
new
fans
is
to
start
touring.

However,
before
setting
foot
on
stage,
you
need
to
have
a
clear
picture
as
to
what
songs
you
will
be
performing
(and
in
what
order),
what
you
will
be
wearing,
and
who
you
will
be
performing
for.

To
start,
if
you
are
an
inexperienced
performer,
the
first
step
would
be
to
invest
in
a
vertical
mirror
to
perfect
your
stage
presence.

By
looking
at
yourself
in
the
mirror
while
you
rehearse
your
songs,
you
are
seeing
yourself
as
the
audience
would
see
you.

This
is
great
practice
to
get
yourself
comfortable
with
expressing
your
true
self
and
image
as
an
artist
before
you
actually
start
performing
in
front
of
a
crowd.

Next,
you
want
to
make
sure
you
are
interacting
with
your
"audience"
by
getting
them
to
join
in
during
appropriate
parts
of
the
song
or
in
between
song
breaks.

Doing
this
will
make
the
audience
become
more
involved
and
attentive
to
your
music
and
(most
importantly)
YOU.

However,
DONT
say
TOO
much!

A
simple
30
second
intro
between
songs
and
a
“Clap
with
me”
here,
“Sing
with
me”
there
is
fine.

Dont
OVERDO
it
and
tell
your
life
story!

Unless
youre
a

  57. 57. 57superstar
and
your
fans
hang
on
your
every
word,
they
will
lose
interest
quick.

Also,
make
it
a
point
to
let
the
audience
know
where
your
merchandise
table
is,
and
promote
your
website,
getConquer
URL,
and/or
social
networking
sites
while
youre
at
it.

Next,
you
have
established
a
set‐list
and
an
understanding
of
what
you
will
be
saying
to
engage
the
audience,
next
you
want
to
practice
your
act
in
front
of
friends
and
family
(who
will
be
honest
in
critiquing
you).

This
will
get
you
more
comfortable
with
performing
in
front
of
a
live
audience,
and
also
will
give
you
an
idea
of
how
to
handle
constructive
criticism.

Finally,
sign
yourself
up
for
local
Conquer
events
(by
connecting
with
your
local
promoter)
and
participate
in
local
talent
shows,
open
mic
events,
and
other
showcases
that
will
further
promote
your
music
and
get
you
experience
in
performing
in
front
of
audiences.


CONQUER
TOURING
SYSTEM

The
Conquer
Touring
System
is
designed
to
get
you
performing
to
an
audience
whenever
you
want;
growing
your
confidence
and
fan
base
as
you
do
it.

The
best
income
producing
activity
an
artist
can
do
is
tour.

It
is
a
great
way
to
get
to
know
your
fans
and
connect,
promote
your
music
and
online
links,
and
make
an
income.

The
most
important
part
of
touring
is
your
performance.

To
start
practicing
in
front
of
a
“live”
audience,
one
way
is
to
participate
in
the
Conquer
Touring
System
set
up
for
“new”
and
“established”
artists.

The
Conquer
shows
happen
regionally
(based
on
demand)
and
on
a
bi‐weekly
(or
weekly)
basis
depending
on
your
area.

How
it
works:

1. Artist
contacts
requests
to
join
a
tour
via
ConquerCads.com.
2. Conquer
Events
Liaison
reviews
acts
already
on
bill,
or
type
of
show,
and
matches
artist
to
show.
(i.e.
“jazz”
style
–
jazz,
soft
blues,
r&b
artists;
“rock”
style
–
classic,
hard,
and
pop
rock
artists)

  58. 58. 583. Artist
is
notified
via
email
and
getConquer
artist
admin
whether
they
are
approved
or
denied
for
the
show.
4. Conquer
Events
Liaison
informs
“approved”
artist
the
date,
time
of
load‐in/soundcheck,
time
for
doors,
and
ticket
price.
5. Conquer
Events
Liaison
informs
“denied”
artist
of
the
next
show
for
their
“genre”
and
when
to
sign‐up
by.
6. DAY
OF
SHOW:
Artist
goes
to
soundcheck/load‐in
(best
to
be
ten
to
fifteen
mins.
early)
7. AFTER
PERFORMANCE:
Artist
greets
fans,
signs
tickets,
promotes
social
sites
and
getConquer
URL
to
audience.
8. IF
HAVING
A
FOLLOW
UP
PERFORMANCE:
Inform
audience
of
next
show
and
encourage
to
come
out
(and
collect
emails
to
create
mailing
list).

Each
weekly
Conquer
Showcase/Concert
varies
in
artists,
genre,
and
venue
(unless
Conquer
Events
Planner
has
set
up
a
“home”
venue
–
a
venue
that
they
use
weekly).

The
Conquer
Touring
system
is
available
wherever
you
are

‐
as
long
as
there
is
a
demand!

The
current
cities
that
Conquer
has
organized
events
are:

• Philadelphia,
PA
• Seattle,
WA
(and
North
California)
• Boston,
MA
• Nashville,
TN
• New
York,
NY/Rochester,
NY
• Chicago,
IL
• More
are
constantly
being
added…

AFTER
THE
SHOW

Once
youve
performed
your
show,
put
those
emails
you
obtained
to
work
by
adding
them
to
a
database
(with
fans
name,
full
email,
and
location),
search
their
emails
on
your
social
sites
(Twitter,
Chatterbox,
Facebook,
and
Myspace
all
allow
for
email
look‐up),
send
out
mass
mail
about
recent

  59. 59. 59“happenings”
‐
upcoming
shows,
release
parties,
single
release,
EP/album
release,
website
updates,
blog
or
vlog
(video
blog)
posts,
etc.

Use
your
creativity
and
come
up
with
other
ways
to
get
the
most
out
of
your
“new
fans”.

Build
a
personal,
interactive
relationship!

Get
them
sold
on
YOU
(not
just
your
music)!

PLANNING
YOUR
OWN
TOUR

Going
on
tour
(no
matter
how
short
or
long)
is
vital
to
any
artists
career
and
success,
and
it
all
comes
down
to
one
word
–
PREPERATION!
Several
steps
go
into
planning
and
executing
a
successful
tour
–
starting
with
YOU.

You
as
an
artist
must
have
your
performance
and
stage
presence
down
to
a
science
in
order
to
get
anything
out
of
the
performance
(i.e.
repeat
performances,
new
fans,
devoted
fans,
etc.).

Next,
you
have
two
options
–
hire
a
booking
agent
or
book
the
shows
yourself.

Hiring
a
booking
agent
means
you
have
a
dedicated
person
researching
the
right
venues
for
your
act
and
fan
base,
and
sealing
the
deal
with
the
venue.

They
also
do
scheduling
for
each
show
(and
in
between/days
off
‐
“days
without
shows”)
and
make
sure
the
artist
has
ample
time
to
get
to
each
venue
on
time
and
ready.

You
as
the
artist,
with
a
hired
booking
agent,
are
responsible
for
transportation,
wardrobe,
merchandise,
and
sometimes
promotion.

When
working
with
a
booking
agent,
it
is
important
to
know
that
they
work
on
a
commission
basis
–
usually
5
to
10%
of
the
bands
show
earnings
(as
well
as
merchandise
sold
for
some
gigs).

Booking
agents,
however,
DO
NOT
get
a
portion
of
song
sales,
songwriting
or
publishing.
If
you
dont
have
or
want
a
booking
agent,
you
have
the
option
to
do‐it‐yourself,
but
keep
in
mind
YOU
will
be
responsible
for
booking
the
venues,
making
the
right
connections,
and
getting
the
good
turnout,
in
addition
to
performing
and
transportation,
etc.




STAGE
PLOT
(where
band
members
are
on
stage,
number
of
mics,
what
equipment
bringing)
INPUT
LIST
(what
cables
go
where,
what
typical
channel
numbers
for
each,
what
type
of
equipment
being
used,

monitor
mix
levels,
stage
position

  60. 60. 60(stage
left,
stage
right,
upstage
left,
upstage
right,
etc.)










PAYING
FOR
THE
TOUR
Touring
can
be
a
VERY
profitable
area
for
you
and/or
your
band.

You
just
have
to
know
HOW
to
make
money
and
WHEN
and
WHERE
to
invest
your
money.

Like
any
business,
you
want
to
make
a
profit
at
the
end
of
the
day
–
not
end
up
in
debt.

Its
all
about
thinking
smarter
and
logically
about
where
your
money
is
going.

If
you
dip
into
the
“band
fund”
every
week
to
get
some
food,
then
you
are
not
thinking
SMARTER!

An
UnLabel
owner
can
make
a
ton
of
money
without
going
on
tour
–
from
merchandise
sales,
music
download
sales,
and
music
subscription
sales.

The
key
is
SAVING
the
money
received
from
all
these
different
outlets
so
youre
starting
out
in
good
standings.

Other
ways
that
an
artist
can
pay
for
a
tour
is
through

  61. 61. 61company
sponsorships
(instrument,
gear).
For
example,
if
you
are
a
drummer
and
all
you
use
is
Vic
Firth
sticks,
contact
them
about
sponsoring
your
band
in
exchange
for
“Vic
Firth”
promotion
that
you
will
do
while
on
tour
–
whether
its
throwing
your
sticks
out
into
the
crowd
or
simply
thanking
“Vic
Firth”
for
their
sponsorship
during
the
show.

Bottom
line
is
SAVE!

It
may
be
difficult,
but
itll
be
well
worth
it
in
the
end!

While
on
tour,
save
all
of
your
receipts
and
keep
them
in
an
envelope
or
folder.

At
the
end
of
the
tour,
contact
an
accountant
and
have
them
log
all
of
your
receipts
–
theyre
considered
a
“write
off”
and
can
end
up
getting
you
money
back
in
“tax
season”
so
you
can
go
on
tour
again
in
the
future.

HOW
TO
GET
A
BOOKING
AGENT
Obtaining
a
booking
agent
at
the
early
stages
of
your
career
isnt
impossible,
but
its
not
easy
either.

Booking
agents
look
at
several
aspects
of
your
music
career
before
considering,
such
as
amount
of
tickets
you
can
sell
for
a
show
in
a
particular
area,
whether
or
not
you
have
a
marketing
plan
for
your
act
(which
youve
completed),
press,
online
and/or
radio
“buzz”,
whether
or
not
you
can
buy
tickets
for
each
market
you
plan
on
playing
a
show
for,
and
your
“live
performance”
(if
you
can
fill
the
room
with
people
–
or
have
a
dedicated
Street
team
for
each
area).

Very
few
booking
agents
pick
up
“starting”
bands,
but
since
youre
an
UnLabel
owner,
youre
technically
signed
(by
yourself)
and
that
is
to
be
admired
by
some.

It
takes
a
lot
of
dedication
and
hard
work
to
build
your
own
independent
label
and
a
successful
music
career,
and
some
booking
agents
can
appreciate
it.

There
are
also
small,
independent
talent
agencies
that
might
be
interested
in
looking
at
local
talent
because
its
easier
to
book
(the
relationship
has
already
been
developed
with
the
venue).



FINDING
TRANSPORTATION
Whether
youre
going
on
a
two‐month
tour
or
a
two‐week
tour,
how
you
get
there
is
essential!

A
lot
of
factors
go
into
what
type
of
vehicle
(if
any)
you
should
use
to
get
to
each
city;
type
of
act
(band
or
solo
artist),
whether
you
are
an
“opener”
(show
starter)
or
“headliner”
(show
ender),whether
the
venue
has
a
“backline”
(equipment
you
can
use–
i.e.
drum
kit
with
few
or
no


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