A2 Realism

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A2 Realism

  1. 1. A2 Chapter 4 Conclusion Realism, Science & Sociology
  2. 2. Realism <ul><li>Realist names to know: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Russell Keat & John Urry (1982) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>They stress link between sociology & certain kinds of natural sciences due to the degree in control of variable. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>They talk about two different types of systems to be researched: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Open </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Closed </li></ul></ul></ul>
  3. 3. Realism: Open Systems <ul><li>These are systems in which the researcher cannot control or measure all the variables. </li></ul><ul><li>Thus, the researcher cannot make precise predictions about an outcome. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Example: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Meteorologists cannot predict with 100% accuracy the outcome of weather due to too many variables, complexity and it being too large scale to study in a laboratory. </li></ul></ul></ul>
  4. 4. Realism: Closed Systems <ul><li>A situation where the researcher can control and measure all the relevant variables. </li></ul><ul><li>This sort of system lends well to the goal set out by Popper, which argues we should try to make ‘precise predictions’ in sociology. </li></ul><ul><li>Example: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Laboratory experiments such as used in chemistry or physics. </li></ul></ul>
  5. 5. Realism and its link with Sociology <ul><li>Realists argue Sociologists study open systems that are too complex to make exact predictions. </li></ul><ul><li>Example: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Cannot predict crime rates precisely as there are too many variables involved– most which cannot be controlled, measured or even identified. </li></ul></ul>
  6. 6. Realism: Butterfly Effect <ul><li>Refers to an idea that even the variables such as the beating of a butterfly’s wing could have knock on effects creating minute atmospheric changes that could ultimately contribute to creating dangerous weather storms, such as tornados! </li></ul>
  7. 7. Underlying Structure
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