Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
0
Presentation on Apo Reef updates 2013
Presentation on Apo Reef updates 2013
Presentation on Apo Reef updates 2013
Presentation on Apo Reef updates 2013
Presentation on Apo Reef updates 2013
Presentation on Apo Reef updates 2013
Presentation on Apo Reef updates 2013
Presentation on Apo Reef updates 2013
Presentation on Apo Reef updates 2013
Presentation on Apo Reef updates 2013
Presentation on Apo Reef updates 2013
Presentation on Apo Reef updates 2013
Presentation on Apo Reef updates 2013
Presentation on Apo Reef updates 2013
Presentation on Apo Reef updates 2013
Presentation on Apo Reef updates 2013
Presentation on Apo Reef updates 2013
Presentation on Apo Reef updates 2013
Presentation on Apo Reef updates 2013
Presentation on Apo Reef updates 2013
Presentation on Apo Reef updates 2013
Presentation on Apo Reef updates 2013
Presentation on Apo Reef updates 2013
Presentation on Apo Reef updates 2013
Presentation on Apo Reef updates 2013
Presentation on Apo Reef updates 2013
Presentation on Apo Reef updates 2013
Presentation on Apo Reef updates 2013
Presentation on Apo Reef updates 2013
Presentation on Apo Reef updates 2013
Presentation on Apo Reef updates 2013
Presentation on Apo Reef updates 2013
Presentation on Apo Reef updates 2013
Presentation on Apo Reef updates 2013
Presentation on Apo Reef updates 2013
Presentation on Apo Reef updates 2013
Presentation on Apo Reef updates 2013
Presentation on Apo Reef updates 2013
Presentation on Apo Reef updates 2013
Presentation on Apo Reef updates 2013
Presentation on Apo Reef updates 2013
Presentation on Apo Reef updates 2013
Presentation on Apo Reef updates 2013
Presentation on Apo Reef updates 2013
Presentation on Apo Reef updates 2013
Presentation on Apo Reef updates 2013
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Presentation on Apo Reef updates 2013

504

Published on

Various data on Apo Reef Natural Park situated in the Municipality of Sablayan, Province of Occidental Mindoro.

Various data on Apo Reef Natural Park situated in the Municipality of Sablayan, Province of Occidental Mindoro.

Published in: Art & Photos, Technology
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
504
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
11
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. APO REEF NATURAL PARK “the precious gift of God to the people of Sablayan, Occidental Mindoro, Philippines” Presented by: EMS I ROBERT P. DUQUIL Assistant PASu, Apo Reef Natural Park DENR-CENRO, Sablayan, Occidental Mindoro
  • 2. BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF APO REEF NATURAL PARK  Location – It lies under the clear blue waters of the West Philippine Sea. – 15 nautical miles west of Sablayan, Occidental Mindoro – 20 nautical miles northeast of the Calamian Groups of Islands, Northern Palawan. 2
  • 3. BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF APO REEF NATURAL PARK 3
  • 4. Area: 15,792 hectares  Marine: 15,763 has  Land Area: 29 has Buffer Zone Area: 11,677 hectares (All Marine) Total Area: 27,469 hectares (PA + Buffer Zone) 4
  • 5. Apo Island Apo Menor Cayos del Bajo 5
  • 6. • 1980 - Apo Reef was designated as Marine Reserve (Presidential Proclamation No. 1801). • 1992 - Apo Reef was included in the initial listing of IPAS sites all over the country pursuant to RA7586, also known as the National Integrated Protected Areas System (NIPAS) Act of 1992. 6
  • 7. • 1994 - Apo Reef became part of the Conservation of Priority Protected Areas Project (CPPAP). The CPPAP officially ended on June 30, 2002. • 1996 - Apo Reef was declared as a Protected Area under the category of Natural Park (Presidential Proclamation 868) and its surrounding waters as Buffer Zone pursuant to RA7586 or NIPAS Act of 1992. 7
  • 8.  Habitat and Ecosystem • Mangrove Habitat • Mangroves serve as a vital nursery area for juvenile fishes and nutrient production that contribute to the aquatic food chain. • The mangrove forest and the lagoon are home to several species of fish, stingrays, jellyfishes, marine plants and other marine organisms. • The mangrove forest also serves as habitat 8 for several species of shorebirds.
  • 9.  Habitat and Ecosystem • Beach Habitat (Sandy Beaches, Beach Forest, Karstic Rock) 9
  • 10.  Habitat and Ecosystem • Marine Habitat (Coral Reefs, Lagoons, Seagrass & Algal Flat) 10
  • 11.  Present Status and Conditions • Flora and Fauna – 47 species of migratory and resident breeders birds – 46 species of plants (terrestrial) – 7 species of seagrasses – 26 species of algae – 385 species of fishes (85 families) – 78 genera of marine invertebrates – 190 species of hard and 7 species of soft corals (species of hard corals represent 38% of 488 known species of hard corals in the Philippines) 11
  • 12. • Coral Cover – 16.09% - CY 2009 Survey “The condition of the reef transects for the whole study was poor. In spite of the generally poor hard coral cover in ARNP, the coral communities in several monitoring stations of the park remained diverse.” • Coral Species – 190 species of hard and 7 species of soft corals (species of hard corals represent 38% of 488 known species of hard corals in the Philippines) 12
  • 13. Coral Cover of Apo Reef from 1994 to 2009 Year Surveyed Coral Cover 1994 33% DENR-CEP thru UPMSI 1999 33% DENR-CPPAP thru PCU and PIU Staff 2003 37.13% DENR & WWF/KKP thru Mr. E. Applied Environmental Sciences 2006 51.03% DENR & WWF/KKP thru Mr. E. Applied Environmental Sciences 2009 16.09% DENR & WWF/KKP thru Consultants 13
  • 14. • Reef Fish (based on CY 2009 Survey) – Species Richness – 281 species from 37 families – Total Abundance – 22,176 individuals – Biomass – 1,411 kg (from the 15 stations surveyed) – Average Biomass Estimate – 188.14 tons/km² – Standing Stock of Reef Fish – 6,396.76 tons (based on the average biomass estimate and the total coral cover/reef area of 34 km²) • Fish Species – 385 species of fishes (85 14 families)
  • 15. Comparison of 1994, 2003, 2006 and 2009 survey data of reef fishes at Apo Reef Natural Park are summarized as follows: Parameter 1994 2003 2006 2009 148 species 225 species 226 species 281 species 24 families 30 families 30 families 37 12,075 individuals 10,121 individuals 9,246 individuals 22,176 individuals Estimated Fish Biomass 512 kg 231 kg 1,238 kg 1,411 kg Mean Estimated Fish Biomass Estimates (fish counts converted into weights per unit area) 107.39 tons/km² 66.13 tons/km² 330.14 tons/km² 188.14 tons/ km² Standing Stocks of Reef Fish (based on the average biomass estimate and the total coral cover/reef area of 34 km²) 3,651.26 tons 2,248.42 tons 11,302.96 tons 6,396.76 tons Species Richness Abundance 15
  • 16. Threatened/Near-Threatened Species of Wildlife Near Threatened Species (IUCN 3.1) Vulnerable Species (Under DAO 2004-15, pursuant to RA 9147) Species listed under CITES (Appendix I) 28 June 1979 Nicobar Pigeon (Caloenas nicobarica) 16
  • 17. Threatened/Near-Threatened Species of Wildlife Green Turtle (Chelonia mydas) Species listed under CITES (Appendix I) 1 July 1975 Endangered Species (IUCN 3.1; DAO 2004-15, pursuant to RA 9147) 17
  • 18. Threatened/Near-Threatened Species of Wildlife Hawksbill Turtle (Eretmochelys imbricata) Critically Endangered Species (IUCN 3.1; DAO 2004-15, pursuant to RA 9147) Species listed under CITES (Appendix I), 4 February 1977 18
  • 19. Threatened/Near-Threatened Species of Wildlife Smooth Top Shell (Trochus niloticus) Coconut Crab (Birgus latro) Threatened Species (FAO No. 208, Series of 2001, pursuant to RA 8550) Giant Clams (Tridacna spp) Endangered Species (FAO No. 208, Series of 2001, pursuant to RA 8550) Listed in CITES Appendix I, 29 July 1983 and 1 August 1985 19
  • 20. Threatened/Near-Threatened Species of Wildlife  Hard/Stony Corals (Scleractinia spp.) Listed in CITES Appendix II, 18 January 1990  Blue Corals (Helioporidae spp.)  Organ-pipe Corals (Tubiporidae spp.)  Fire Corals (Milleporidae) Listed in CITES Appendix II, 01 August 1985 20
  • 21. Threatened/Near-Threatened Species of Wildlife  Long-snouted Bottlenose Dolphin (Tursiops truncates)  Spinner Dolphin (Stenella longirostris) Endangered Species (FAO No. 208, Series of 2001, pursuant to RA 8550) Listed in CITES Appendix II, 28 June 1979 21
  • 22. Threatened/Near-Threatened Species of Wildlife  Humphead/Napoleon Wrasse (Cheilinus undulatus) Species listed in CITES Appendix II (Prohibited under Section 97 of RA 8550) Manta Ray (Manta sp.)  Prohibited Species (FAO No. 193, Series of 1998, effective April 12, 1998) 22
  • 23.  Potential Capabilities in terms of Ecotourism  Apo Reef is one of the bestknown diving destinations in the Philippines.  All of the breathtaking marine resources in Apo Reef give divers an unforgettable and rewarding experience.  The Park has the unique underwater wealth of wonders which is teeming with marine flora, fauna and luxuriant coral growth acclaimed as one of the world’s best.  The park considered as the precious gift of God to the people of Sablayan and show window of Occidental Mindoro. 23
  • 24. LIST OF PRIORITY SPECIES & RESOURCE USE • Bird Species – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – Egret, Cattle Egret Egret, Eastern/Pacific Reef Fantail, Pied / Malaysian Kingfisher, White Collared Oriole, Black-naped Owl, Philippine Scops Pigeon, Nicobar Pigeon, Nutmeg/Pied Imperial Rail, Barred Scrubfowl, Tabon Sunbird, Olive-Backed Sunbird, Purple-Throated Tern, Black-naped Tern, Common Tern, Great Crested Tern, Roseate 24
  • 25. LIST OF PRIORITY SPECIES & RESOURCE USE • Marine Species • Dolphins, Bottlenose • Dolphins, Risso's • Dolphins, Spinner • Giant Clams • Lobster, Painted Spiny • Manta Ray • Smooth Top Shell • Turtle, Green • Turtle, Hawksbill 25
  • 26. LIST OF PRIORITY SPECIES & RESOURCE USE • Fish Species • Butterflyfishes • Damselfishes • Emperor Fish • Fusiliers • Goatfishes • Groupers • Jacks • Parrotfish, Bumphead • Parrotfishes • Siganids • Snappers • Surgeonfishes • Wrasse, Humphead/Napoleon 26
  • 27. STATUS OF ECOTOURISM DEVELOPMENT ACCOMPLISHED AND ON-GOING PROJECTS 30 footer w/ 115 HP Yamaha Outboard Engine Repair of PAO Building Acquisition of two (2) High Speed Watercrafts 26 footer w/ 50 HP Yamaha Outboard Engine 27
  • 28. STATUS OF ECOTOURISM DEVELOPMENT REVENUES YEAR 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 TOTAL Total Collections (IN PESO) 67,355.00 223,150.00 260,450.00 397,645.00 451,490.00 569,750.00 838,260.00 889,870.00 1,073,830.00 1,079,100.00 1,377,100.00 1,627,100.00 1,641,777.00 Monthly Average (IN PESO) 5,612.92 18,595.83 21,704.17 33,137.08 37,624.17 47,479.17 69,855.00 74,155.83 89,485.83 89,925.00 114,758.33 135,592.00 136,815.00 2,459,508.00 12,956,385.00 204,959.00
  • 29. STATUS OF ECOTOURISM DEVELOPMENT VISITORS RECORDED YEAR 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 TOTAL 871 1,831 1,166 1,514 1,717 2,485 2,381 1,471 1,825 2,221 2,283 2,859 2,404 2,945 Number of Visitors FOREIGN 486 1,421 892 1,038 1,274 2,159 1,923 1,031 1,255 1,619 1,779 2,098 1,660 1,855 LOCAL 385 410 274 476 443 326 458 440 570 602 504 761 744 1,090
  • 30.  Potential Capabilities in terms of Ecotourism  Connectivity with other major destinations such as Northern Palawan, Puerto Galera, Batangas and Boracay, Subic, Cebu  Potential growth of domestic cruising  Continuous growth of SCUBA diving industry  Proximity of Apo Reef from Metro Manila 30
  • 31. Significant issues and management concerns gathered from monitoring work • Main Issues & Concerns – Collection of endangered and prohibited species such as Top Shell (Samong), Giant Clams/Tridacna spp. (Manglot) and lobster. Octopian fishers are responsible in the collection. – Cyanide Fishing. Fishers using spearfishing, set longline and live fish food trade (buhaybuhay) were also using sodium cyanide to catch their target species. • Management Interventions – Enactment of PAMB policies regulating octopian & spearfishing. Resolution No. 2004-022 and 2005003 enacted by PAMB. – PAMB Resolution prohibiting the use of spearfishing and active fishing gears. Resolution No. 2004018 and 2006-002 enacted by PAMB. – PAMB Resolution prohibiting the Buhay-Buhay Fishing at Apo Reef Natural Park. Resolution No. 2004017 enacted by PAMB prohibiting the "buhay=buhay" fishery. – Crown of Thorns Infestation 31
  • 32. Significant issues and management concerns gathered from monitoring work • Main Issues & Concerns – Collection of endangered and prohibited species such as Top Shell (Samong), Giant Clams/Tridacna spp. (Manglot) and lobster. Octopian fishers are responsivle in the collection. – Cyanide Fishing. Fishers using spearfishing, set longline and live fish food trade (buhaybuhay) were also using sodium cyanide to catch their target species. – Crown of Thorns Infestation • Management Interventions – PAMB Resolution prohibiting the use of set longline (kitang) or hookand-line. Resolution No. 2006-003 enacted by PAMB prohibiting the set longline methods. – Recommendation: PAMB Resolution prohibiting all fishing methods or gears that requires diving or swimming at Apo Reef Natural Park. PAMB Action: Enactment of NoTake-Zone Policy at Apo Reef, Resolution No. 2007-005 & Ordinance No. 001, Series of 2007. Partnership: The Municipal Government provided alternative livelihood for the affected fishermen in support to the closure of fishing & other fishery related activities. 32
  • 33. Management interventions taken/proposed to address the issues • Issues – Poaching by local fishermen. Inadequate alternative livelihood for the local fishermen that forced them to Poach in the protected area. – Absence of Boundary Marker Buoys • Proposed Management Interventions – Assistance and education to the displaced fishermen to look for alternative livelihood. Lobbying to concerned groups or individuals in the government or private sectors for any livelihood support for the benefits displaced fishermen in the declaration of “no-take-zone” policy of Apo Reef. – Installation of Marker Buoys within the Protected Area / Buffer Zone Boundary, especially in its four (4) major corners and within the secondary corners to be identified 33
  • 34. Maraming salamat po! 34
  • 35. ENGAGEMENT OF PARTNERS  Co-Management between the DENR, thru the PAMB & PASu, & the LGU Sablayan  Supports of LGU Sablayan  Protection & Law Enforcements. The LGU Sablayan provided manpower and logistics in support to the operation of TF MARLEN at Apo Reef such as, but not limited to food provision, boats, radios, fuel & supplies.  Ecotourism Program. The LGU Sablayan undertakes the ecotourism development of Apo Reef Natural Park in support to protection and conservation program.  Billboards & Interpretive Signs 36
  • 36. ENGAGEMENT OF PARTNERS  Co-Management between the DENR, thru the PAMB & PASu, & the LGU Sablayan  Supports of LGU Sablayan  Ecotourism Program.  Trail/Boardwalk Maintenance  Floating Raft Maintenance 37
  • 37. ENGAGEMENT OF PARTNERS  Co-Management between the DENR, thru the PAMB & PASu, & the LGU Sablayan  Supports of LGU Sablayan  Ecotourism Program.   Construction & Maintenance of Pavilion Construction & Maintenance of Huts 38
  • 38. ENGAGEMENT OF PARTNERS  Support from the LGU in the Declaration of “No-Take-Zone” Policy of Apo Reef  The LGU Sablayan installed Fish Aggregating Devices, locally known as “Payao”, in the Municipal Waters in support to the alternative livelihood of displaced fishermen of Apo Reef. Sample of Payao’s installed by LGU Sablayan Fishing at Payao’s installed 39
  • 39. ENGAGEMENT OF PARTNERS  Support from the LGU in the Declaration of “No-Take-Zone” Policy of Apo Reef Yellow fin tuna and skip jack Caught by fisherman at the payao 40
  • 40. ENGAGEMENT OF PARTNERS  Partnership between the DENR, thru the PAMB & PASu, & the WWF Philippines  Supports from WWF Philippines  Technical Assistance/Research (2003, 2006 & 2009)  Logistics for Protection & Conservation Work 41
  • 41. ENGAGEMENT OF PARTNERS ACCOMPLISHED AND ON-GOING PROJECTS Construction of Administration Building implemented by PTA (Not yet functional) 42
  • 42. ENGAGEMENT OF PARTNERS ACCOMPLISHED AND ON-GOING PROJECTS Construction and Installation of Desalination Facilities implemented by PTA through the DPWH (Not yet Operational)
  • 43. ECOTOURISM PLANS Visitor Management • Carrying Capacity – 104 person per day ACTIVITIES Allowed Activities Controlled Activities Restricted Activities Recreational swimming Scuba Diving Snorkeling Sightseeing Sun bathing Photography Glass bottom boat Kayaking Birdwatching Dolphin watching Game fishing Nesting Turtle watching “No-Take-Zone Policy” Implemented since 2007
  • 44. ECOTOURISM PLANS Ecotourism Needs ACTIVITIES MARKET • Diving, Snorkeling and sun bathing International and local tourist • Bird watching and Lagoon Rafting International / local tourist and students • Establishment of Research Center and Tourist Briefing Center within the DENR Building International / local tourist and students • • • • Manila based information center in the DENR Regional Office Monthly radio plug in the local radio station Information Education Campaign materials about Apo Reef • • • Display Center of Souvenir items t-shirt, caps and handy crafts bearing the Apo Reef Logo Construction of Tourist Boat glass bottom boat service boat for tourist • Dive Shop Establishment For advertising, marketing activity Community and environmental awareness of the Sablayaños International, Local and Fisher folks International / local tourist and students For hiring, international, local tourist and students For hiring, international, local tourist and students
  • 45. Welcome Aboard! Thank You!

×