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EDIT 7320 Literature Review Presentation

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This presentation compliments my literature graphic found at andy.plemmons.googlepages.com In my applied research project, I am looking at ways that elementary students select books in the media …

This presentation compliments my literature graphic found at andy.plemmons.googlepages.com In my applied research project, I am looking at ways that elementary students select books in the media center and how I, as the the media specialist, can support this process.


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  • 1. Finding IT: Supporting student book selection in the elementary media center Literature Review Graphic Applied Project Created By Andy Plemmons University of Georgia Summer 2008
  • 2.  
  • 3. Prior to Selection
    • Preference vs. Interests
    • Gender
    • Motivation
    • Reading Experiences
    • Developmental Level
    • Other?
  • 4. Stages of Selection: Searching
    • Searching (Reuter calls it Selecting)
    • Superficial
    • Title, author, illustrations, previous text, series,
    • Touching books
    • Browsing
  • 5. Stages of Selection: Studying
    • Studying (Reuter calls it Judging)
    • Taking a closer look
    • Examining text size, cover, illustrations, length
    • Pondering difficulty
    • Narrowing choices
  • 6. Stages of Selection: Connecting
    • Connecting (Reuter calls it Sampling)
    • Judging whether or not the book matches student needs
    • Deeper connection with book through multiple factors
  • 7. Stages of Selection: Overall
    • Selection happens at any stage
    • Conversation happens throughout process
    • Tendency for lower readers to be in “Searching” stage and higher readers to use multiple stages/strategies
  • 8. Support: Environment
    • Access to materials
    • Choice
    • Print-rich
    • Environment of book conversation
  • 9. Support: Interaction
    • Teacher Influence
    • Advisory & Questioning
    • Setup environment
    • Bringing students to media center
    • Sharing/discussing books
    • Differentiating for various learners
  • 10. Support: Interaction
    • Parent Influence
    • Providing books
    • Reading & discussing
    • Recommendation (limited influence)
    • Observing selection and sharing with school
  • 11. Support: Interaction
    • Peer Influence
    • Strongest influence (most research agrees)
    • Conversation throughout process
  • 12. Support: Strategies
    • Modeling
    • Goldilocks
    • BOOKMATCH
    • Five Finger
    • Benefits: Jumpstarts conversations, offers source of support, makes selection explicit
    • Pitfalls: Focuses too much on one aspect of selection such as difficulty, not enough overall experience with selection
  • 13. Support: Organization
    • Media Center arrangement (categories, signs, etc)
    • Labeling-signs, book levels
    • Promotion displays
    • Incentive displays or shelving
    • Limitations on checkout
  • 14. Support: Conversation The common thread among research Quotes to support conversation: "Listening to our students share explanations of their selection systems helps us as teachers assess children's understanding of how to choose books and whether that understanding is developing in depth and breadth." (Olhausen & Jepsen, 1992) "In order to help children discover and practice ways of becoming independent learners in these real classrooms, we believe that teachers need to provide occasions for authentic literacy experiences to occur." (Olhausen & Jepsen, 1992)
  • 15. Support: Conversation The common thread among research Quotes to support conversation: "When think-alouds were exercised as a teaching approach within the classroom, they became routine, were used as needed in a variety of real situations, and were broken down with clear details and steps (Duffy, 2003). Students thought about their own thinking process, slowing it down in order to make decisions as readers and learners." (Wutz & Wedwick, 2005)  
  • 16. Support: Conversation The common thread among research Quotes to support conversation:    "The data consistently revealed that children place a high priority on reading books they hear about from others--friends, parents, and teachers.  The interviews support the findings of other researchers who have suggested that social interaction is a primary factor in literacy development (Guthrie et al., 1993)." (Palmer & Codling, 1994)  
  • 17. Support: Conversation The common thread among research Quotes to support conversation: "Although teachers and family were mentioned, the children most frequently responded that they had found out about books they wanted to read from their friends. This finding supports the fact that children are motivated to read by sharing books with one another." (Edmunds & Bauserman, 2006)   
  • 18. Support: Conversation The common thread among research Quotes to support conversation: "The real link seems to lie in the verbal interaction that occurs between adult and child during story reading (Snow 1996). Since children learn language by actively constructing meaning (Vgotsky 1962; Lindfors 1987), the seeds of literacy lie in the social construction of meaning around print, that is, the talk—“scaffolding,” explaining, clarifying—between the reader and child listener as they look at, point to, and label objects, and discuss print and its meaning. Successful storybook reading that leads to literacy involves interaction in which participants actively construct meaning based on the text (Fox 1993; Heath 1983; Ninio 1980; Teale and Sulzby 1992)." (Cullinan, 2000)   
  • 19. Support: Conversation The common thread among research Quotes to support conversation: "...all pupils can be taken forward in their reading habits and understanding if they are encouraged to take a critical perspective on their own reading diet, and if they are helped to see how as readers they are constructed by the culture. This might happen, for instance, if pupils were asked to reflect on how they had come to have the tastes they have, or if there was more discussion in classrooms about how children might negotiate their own paths through the consumerism or the ethical issues that are raised in and by their magazines." (Coles & Hall, 2002)  
  • 20. Support: Conversation The common thread among research Quotes to support conversation: "Nearly all the children mentioned factors in the socialties facet during book selection." (Reuter,2007)  
  • 21. Support: Conversation The common thread among research Quotes to support conversation: "Based on the information, we can help our students make thoughtful choices by * talking to our students about how they choose their books. Students need to be aware of the choices they are making and why they are making those choices, if they are going to make thoughtful choices. * discussing things that can influence book choices. Make sure that our students know what is available to help them make book choices. They need to know what the blurb is and where they can find it. They need to know what kind of information is available on the book cover. * providing more opportunities to discuss books in the classroom. As students have more chances to talk about books, we hope they will be more likely to be influenced by the opinions of others." (Greaney, 1999)
  • 22. Moving Ahead
    • Selection is an individual process.
    • Students have a lack of awareness of the strategies that they use to select books.
    • Students have varying levels of book selection strategies.
    • Conversation is key. 
  • 23. Annotated Bibliography
    • Andy.Plemmons - Literature Review