Using Educational Games and GamificationAndy PetroskiDirector & Assistant Professor of LearningTechnologiesHarrisburg Univ...
Andy PetroskiDirector of Learning TechnologiesAssistant Professor of LearningTechnologiesHarrisburg University@apetroskiLT...
using educational games and gamificationMultiplayer ClassroomUsing Games in the CurriculumGame Elements
who are you and what are you looking for?
story character goalobstacles feedback levels    
Game Mechanics Learning PrinciplesRules Provide expectationsGoals & objectives Motivate by applying to real-lifesituations...
(a) contextual bridging, (b) high time-on-task,(c) motivation and goal orientation, even after failure,(d) providing learn...
MultipleIntelligencesSpatialLinguisticLogicalMathematicalBodilyKinestheticMusicalInterpersonalIntrapersonalNaturalisticExi...
Flow: The Psychology of Optimal ExperienceMihaly CsikszentmihalyiChallengeSkillbalance
games in education
types of gamesSimple Games SimulatedEnvironmentsAdventureWorlds• Primarily single player• Drill and Practice• Game show / ...
simple games Simple Games• Primarily single player• Drill and Practice• Game show / TV showthemes• Content driven• Limited...
simple gamesBenefits• Lots of existing games & templates• “Easy” to create• Simple to implement• Simple to play• Targeted ...
simple games Simple Games• Primarily single player• Drill and Practice• Game show / TV showthemes• Content driven• Limited...
simple gamesLimitations• Memorization and identification• Limited feedback• Story and character is difficult to pull-off• ...
simulated environmentsExamplesSimulatedEnvironments• Primarily single player• Decision making• Job / life themes• Variable...
simulated environmentsBenefits• Targeted content• Multimodal interaction• Story / path intensive• Character driven• Each p...
simulated environmentsCreatingEvaluationAnalyzingApplyingUnderstandingRememberingSimulatedEnvironments• Primarily single p...
simulated environmentsLimitations• Somewhat limited availability• Difficult to create yourself (team)• Cannot customize th...
adventure worldsExamplesAdventureWorlds• Multiplayer• Planning and decisions• Fantasy themes• Experience driven• Expansive...
adventure worldsBenefits• Open experiences• Environment intensive• Multimodal interaction• Customizable through Modding• R...
adventure worldsCreatingEvaluationAnalyzingApplyingUnderstandingRememberingAdventureWorlds• Multiplayer• Planning and deci...
adventure worldsLimitations• Somewhat limited availability• Very difficult to create yourself• Takes time to play, includi...
Students GamesEffectiveTeaching &LearningStrategiesImproved Learning Outcomes21st Century SkillsEducatorsgames in education
outcomes
the concept of applying game-design thinking to non-gameapplications to make them more fun and engaginggamification
Loyalty Programs(redemption)Game Design(engagement)BehavioralEconomics(status/reputation)gamification
gamification
story character goalobstacles feedback levels    
Everyone in this class is going toreceive an F . . . unless . . . you level up!
MMORPGMassively Multiplayer Online Role Playing GameMMOGMassively Multiplayer Online Game
MMORPGElementsXPLevelsAvatarGuildsZonesRolesQuestsCraftingRaidsLandsmultiplayer classroom
multiplayer classroom
Marked Tree High School (Biology) Before - December 2009,62% of sophomores takingBiology were passing with aD or higher, ...
Velencia College: United States History to 1877 Increased engagement, but grades were only slightlystronger Students wer...
Robert Louis Stevenson Middle School: General Math Increased engagement in all activities Less focus on the grade After...
create games to learn
questions & feedback
resources• EdWeb Game-Based Learning Community• Digital Games in Schools Handbook• Videogames in Education Webcast Segment...
resources• Is Minecraft the Ultimate Ed Tool?• Minecraft.edu• The Multiplayer Classroom Book• Gamestar Mechanic• Harrisbur...
other opportunitiesFuture WebinarsUsing iPads and Mobile Learning in theClassroomTuesday, May 21 from 3:30 PM – 4:30 PMCha...
other opportunitiesLTMS 603: Engaging with Learning Activities, Games & SimulationsLearn more:• http://www.harrisburgu.edu...
other opportunitiesEducators’ Technology Clinics3 days, 3 days, 1 day9 AM to 4 PMUsing Educational Games and GamificationJ...
feedback survey
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Using Educational Games and Gamification

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Motivation, clear objectives, critical thinking about consequences, and instant and abundant feedback are all elements of the best learning experiences. These are also elements of the best games. There is momentum behind games in education, including a large number of teachers who are using games like Minecraft and Civilizaton or gamifying their classroom to teach core concepts and develop 21st century skills. Attend this webinar to learn more about games and game techniques can be used in education.
-Explore the elements that make games good learning experiences
-Look at how off-the-shelf educational games can be used in the curriculum
-Learn how teachers are turning their classroom into a Multiplayer Classroom with storytelling and gamification

From a 5-20-13 webinar

Published in: Education
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Transcript of "Using Educational Games and Gamification"

  1. 1. Using Educational Games and GamificationAndy PetroskiDirector & Assistant Professor of LearningTechnologiesHarrisburg University of Science & Technology
  2. 2. Andy PetroskiDirector of Learning TechnologiesAssistant Professor of LearningTechnologiesHarrisburg University@apetroskiLTMSCAELTHarrisburgUniversity
  3. 3. using educational games and gamificationMultiplayer ClassroomUsing Games in the CurriculumGame Elements
  4. 4. who are you and what are you looking for?
  5. 5. story character goalobstacles feedback levels    
  6. 6. Game Mechanics Learning PrinciplesRules Provide expectationsGoals & objectives Motivate by applying to real-lifesituationsFeedback via ongoing scores, audio& visual cuesMotivate by positive reinforcementConflict & crisis Provide scaffolding (increasingdifficulty)Resolution Allows for reflection on outcomegames in education
  7. 7. (a) contextual bridging, (b) high time-on-task,(c) motivation and goal orientation, even after failure,(d) providing learners with cues, hints and partialsolutions to keep them progressing,(e) personalization of learning, and(f) infinite patiencegame attributes & learning
  8. 8. MultipleIntelligencesSpatialLinguisticLogicalMathematicalBodilyKinestheticMusicalInterpersonalIntrapersonalNaturalisticExistentialmultiple intelligences
  9. 9. Flow: The Psychology of Optimal ExperienceMihaly CsikszentmihalyiChallengeSkillbalance
  10. 10. games in education
  11. 11. types of gamesSimple Games SimulatedEnvironmentsAdventureWorlds• Primarily single player• Drill and Practice• Game show / TV showthemes• Content driven• Limited play time /sessions• Primarily single player• Decision making• Job / life themes• Variable driven• Moderate play time /sessions• Multiplayer• Planning and decisions• Fantasy themes• Experience driven• Expansive play time /sessions
  12. 12. simple games Simple Games• Primarily single player• Drill and Practice• Game show / TV showthemes• Content driven• Limited play time /sessionsExamples
  13. 13. simple gamesBenefits• Lots of existing games & templates• “Easy” to create• Simple to implement• Simple to play• Targeted content• Content can easily be changed /adaptedSimple Games• Primarily single player• Drill and Practice• Game show / TV showthemes• Content driven• Limited play time /sessions
  14. 14. simple games Simple Games• Primarily single player• Drill and Practice• Game show / TV showthemes• Content driven• Limited play time /sessionsCreatingEvaluationAnalyzingApplyingUnderstandingRemembering
  15. 15. simple gamesLimitations• Memorization and identification• Limited feedback• Story and character is difficult to pull-off• Multiplayer is competition only• Limited motivation over time• Requires little teacher interactionSimple Games• Primarily single player• Drill and Practice• Game show / TV showthemes• Content driven• Limited play time /sessions
  16. 16. simulated environmentsExamplesSimulatedEnvironments• Primarily single player• Decision making• Job / life themes• Variable driven• Moderate play time /sessions
  17. 17. simulated environmentsBenefits• Targeted content• Multimodal interaction• Story / path intensive• Character driven• Each play can be a different experience• Requires teacher interactionSimulatedEnvironments• Primarily single player• Decision making• Job / life themes• Variable driven• Moderate play time /sessions
  18. 18. simulated environmentsCreatingEvaluationAnalyzingApplyingUnderstandingRememberingSimulatedEnvironments• Primarily single player• Decision making• Job / life themes• Variable driven• Moderate play time /sessions
  19. 19. simulated environmentsLimitations• Somewhat limited availability• Difficult to create yourself (team)• Cannot customize the experience• Confined environment• Multiplayer is primarily competition• Takes time to play, includingorientationSimulatedEnvironments• Primarily single player• Decision making• Job / life themes• Variable driven• Moderate play time /sessions
  20. 20. adventure worldsExamplesAdventureWorlds• Multiplayer• Planning and decisions• Fantasy themes• Experience driven• Expansive play time /sessions
  21. 21. adventure worldsBenefits• Open experiences• Environment intensive• Multimodal interaction• Customizable through Modding• Recording (Machinima)• Customizable avatar• Collaboration as well as competition• Requires teacher interactionAdventureWorlds• Multiplayer• Planning and decisions• Fantasy themes• Experience driven• Expansive play time /sessions
  22. 22. adventure worldsCreatingEvaluationAnalyzingApplyingUnderstandingRememberingAdventureWorlds• Multiplayer• Planning and decisions• Fantasy themes• Experience driven• Expansive play time /sessions
  23. 23. adventure worldsLimitations• Somewhat limited availability• Very difficult to create yourself• Takes time to play, includingorientation• Play needs to occur over multiplesessions• Requires teacher interaction• Themes may not relate to everystudentAdventureWorlds• Multiplayer• Planning and decisions• Fantasy themes• Experience driven• Expansive play time /sessions
  24. 24. Students GamesEffectiveTeaching &LearningStrategiesImproved Learning Outcomes21st Century SkillsEducatorsgames in education
  25. 25. outcomes
  26. 26. the concept of applying game-design thinking to non-gameapplications to make them more fun and engaginggamification
  27. 27. Loyalty Programs(redemption)Game Design(engagement)BehavioralEconomics(status/reputation)gamification
  28. 28. gamification
  29. 29. story character goalobstacles feedback levels    
  30. 30. Everyone in this class is going toreceive an F . . . unless . . . you level up!
  31. 31. MMORPGMassively Multiplayer Online Role Playing GameMMOGMassively Multiplayer Online Game
  32. 32. MMORPGElementsXPLevelsAvatarGuildsZonesRolesQuestsCraftingRaidsLandsmultiplayer classroom
  33. 33. multiplayer classroom
  34. 34. Marked Tree High School (Biology) Before - December 2009,62% of sophomores takingBiology were passing with aD or higher, 10% of whomhad an A or B. After – December 2010,98% of sophomores takingBiology were passing with aD or higher, 36% of whomhad an A or B. End of quarter test 1 (9 weeks ofquesting)o 2009 – students were 29% proficient orhigher on the examo 2010 – 68% were proficient or advanced End of quarter test 2o 2009 – 31% proficient or advancedo 2010 – 81% proficient or advanced Advancedo 2009 – 3% of students scoring advancedo 2010 – 55% of students scoringadvanced
  35. 35. Velencia College: United States History to 1877 Increased engagement, but grades were only slightlystronger Students were more prepared for class Level chart gave students their status in the class.Previously, he believes most students didn’t know howthey were performing in the class – even some who werepassing choosing to withdrawal. 81% did a “B” or better in preparation. Historically, that’s50%
  36. 36. Robert Louis Stevenson Middle School: General Math Increased engagement in all activities Less focus on the grade After multiplayer classroom, 30% of students who had agrade letter of C or below, had increased their grade to aB or higher
  37. 37. create games to learn
  38. 38. questions & feedback
  39. 39. resources• EdWeb Game-Based Learning Community• Digital Games in Schools Handbook• Videogames in Education Webcast Segment• Immune Attack• DimensionM• iCivics• HotShot Business• Jason Project
  40. 40. resources• Is Minecraft the Ultimate Ed Tool?• Minecraft.edu• The Multiplayer Classroom Book• Gamestar Mechanic• Harrisburg University Gaming Academy
  41. 41. other opportunitiesFuture WebinarsUsing iPads and Mobile Learning in theClassroomTuesday, May 21 from 3:30 PM – 4:30 PMChanging Education with Active LearningWednesday, May 22 from 3:30 PM – 4:30 PMMore info and free registration: bit.ly/17BgFgg
  42. 42. other opportunitiesLTMS 603: Engaging with Learning Activities, Games & SimulationsLearn more:• http://www.harrisburgu.edu/learningtechnologies• apetroski@harrisburgu.eduAttend in Harrisburg or Online!
  43. 43. other opportunitiesEducators’ Technology Clinics3 days, 3 days, 1 day9 AM to 4 PMUsing Educational Games and GamificationJuly 23, 24, 25; August 6, 7, 8; October 269 AM to 4 PMHarrisburgLearn more at www.EdTechClinics.netAttend in Harrisburg
  44. 44. feedback survey

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