LTMS 531 Design Document

Game Design Document
SmyeCity

12/16/13

Created by

Harrisburg University
LTMS 531: Designing G...
LTMS 531 Design Document

Table of Contents
Table of Contents
Introduction: Executive Summary
Business Issue
Game Goal
Ins...
LTMS 531 Design Document
References
Appendix

© 2013

CONFIDENTIAL

3
LTMS 531 Design Document

Introduction: Executive Summary
This document describes an opportunity to apply Serious Game and...
LTMS 531 Design Document
surround it. It’s important to consider how a building can interact with and be affected by its
s...
LTMS 531 Design Document
●

A resident/player (target audience 1) portal for score comparison, communication and
connectio...
LTMS 531 Design Document

Game Theme & Storyline
Premise: As a new city resident you want to explore your surroundings. As...
LTMS 531 Design Document

Character Information
Learner Role
The learner will choose from among several options to play as...
LTMS 531 Design Document
regulations . He was recently told that the price of one of his parts was doubling because the su...
LTMS 531 Design Document

Non-Player Characters
Marvin Vonneworth
About the Character: Marvin is a semi-successful, middle...
LTMS 531 Design Document

Gameplay
Game Structure
The game begins with the player character moving in to his/her new apart...
LTMS 531 Design Document
(resources) but no additional status or progress. Contacting the restaurant to complain will lead...
LTMS 531 Design Document

Game Progression
The game progression indicates the primary interactions in the game and the int...
LTMS 531 Design Document
Life Interaction Sequence (Example)
http://www.webspirationclassroom.com/view/1410610a38beb

© 20...
LTMS 531 Design Document
Building Interaction Sequence (Example)
http://www.webspirationclassroom.com/view/1411595af4f8

G...
LTMS 531 Design Document

A building manager NPC can decide not to apply a change to the building. The player then needs t...
LTMS 531 Design Document

Game Technology & Functionality
The game will function in both mobile (Android, Microsoft & iOS)...
LTMS 531 Design Document
be deducted in the game and points are cumulative gameplay points. Status and asset level can be
...
LTMS 531 Design Document

Graphic Treatment
The following sample interfaces represent the type of graphical treatments tha...
LTMS 531 Design Document
The example interface that follows represents the view when inside a building. The graphics shoul...
LTMS 531 Design Document

Use Cases
The following use cases represent sample game interaction.
Segment ID: 6
Game Segment:...
LTMS 531 Design Document

4. When the PC asks the NPC doorman if the delivery has been dropped off, a conversation results...
LTMS 531 Design Document

References
"Urban Development." Data. N.p., n.d. Web. 08 Oct. 2013., http://data.worldbank.org/t...
LTMS 531 Design Document

Appendix
Interface Sketch

© 2013

CONFIDENTIAL

24
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Smarter Buildings Game Design for LTMS 531: Designing Serious Games & Simulations

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This game design document was created by Charles Palmer, Jenica Jones, Cameron Spurlock and me as part of the LTMS 531: Designing Serious Games & Simulations course in the Learning Technologies Master of Science (LTMS) program at Harrisburg University (http://www.harrisburgu.edu/learningtechnologies). The course is in the Serious Games & Simulation concentration in the LTMS degree.

The students and the professors worked on the project together as a way to further explore and practice game design concepts introduced in class and through readings. The practice game design also supported the development of skills that students applied to their own game design projects.

We partnered with IBM to establish the game concept and communicated with IBM representatives throughout the semester to receive feedback and discuss game design strategies.

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Smarter Buildings Game Design for LTMS 531: Designing Serious Games & Simulations

  1. 1. LTMS 531 Design Document Game Design Document SmyeCity 12/16/13 Created by Harrisburg University LTMS 531: Designing Games & Simulations Jenica Jones, Charles Palmer, Andy Petroski, Cameron Spurlock © 2013 CONFIDENTIAL 1
  2. 2. LTMS 531 Design Document Table of Contents Table of Contents Introduction: Executive Summary Business Issue Game Goal Instructional Strategy Target Audience Learning Objectives Game Theme & Storyline Character Information Learner Role Player Characters Non-Player Characters Gameplay Game Structure Game Progression Game Balance Game Technology & Functionality Tracking & Scoring User Experience Interface Graphic Treatment Sample Dialogue / Character Interaction Use Cases Media Components © 2013 CONFIDENTIAL 2
  3. 3. LTMS 531 Design Document References Appendix © 2013 CONFIDENTIAL 3
  4. 4. LTMS 531 Design Document Introduction: Executive Summary This document describes an opportunity to apply Serious Game and Gamification thinking to better understand and transfer knowledge around the emerging field of Smarter Buildings. Investigation of problems using serious game tactics is becoming a more mainstream practice today, especially when complexity of the problem is a central concern. Making buildings smarter and helping people understand the role our buildings play in our society, is a subject of great complexity and therefore a great opportunity to explore with new thinking. Consideration of how we learn about and share knowledge around smarter building themes using serious game thinking is an innovative approach to a complex problem. Cities can be tremendously efficient. It is easier to provide water and sanitation to people living closer together, while access to health, education, and other social and cultural services is also much more readily available. However, as cities grow, the cost of meeting basic needs increases, as does the strain on the environment and natural resources (Urban Development). With an estimated one million people around the world moving into cities each week, new urban growth is driving demand for buildings and energy use. The US National Science and Technology Council estimates that commercial and residential buildings consume a third of the world's energy. In North America, for example, this translates to 72 percent of the electricity generation, 12 percent of the water use, and 60 percent of non-industrial waste. If worldwide energy-use trends continue, buildings will become the largest consumer of global energy by 2025―more than the transportation and industrial sectors combined. And waste as much as half of the electricity and water that they use. Business Issue Although green buildings are constructed using sustainable materials, smarter buildings are designed to run more efficiently and—more important—to communicate with and about their various systems. With the unprecedented proliferation of smart sensors and control systems over the past decade, many conventional and green buildings have the ability to measure, sense and see the exact condition of practically everything in them. But these systems operate independently, through a mix of vendors, and with different protocols and transport mechanisms. They also advance and mature at different rates. Smarter buildings that emerge from a holistic point of view involve collaboration between facilities and IT organizations at new levels and require new transformational skills in organizations or businesses. In addition, a smarter building doesn’t stop at the four walls that © 2013 CONFIDENTIAL 4
  5. 5. LTMS 531 Design Document surround it. It’s important to consider how a building can interact with and be affected by its surroundings—its externalities. As buildings are designed, constructed, used, inhabited and maintained there are opportunities for smart operations, but the disconnected strategies and actions of stakeholders makes it difficult to coordinate all of the moving parts into one, cohesive ecosystem. In addition, consumers and taxpayers are not informed enough to expect coordination among stakeholders for better quality of life as a result of smart building design and operations. Business Solution There are two (2) primary audiences to be addressed in solving the business issue. ● ● Target Audience 1: Young adults, ages 17-24, that will influence public policy, make living and inhabiting decisions as city dwellers and support municipalities as voters and taxpayers are a target audience for the game. Some members of this audience may also find themselves as members of target audience 2 as they establish careers in the audience 2 fields and rise to leadership positions. The goal of connecting with this audience is that they make good decisions as building consumers and inhabitants and demand smart building rent and purchase options as city inhabitants. Target Audience 2: Municipality employees, architects, builders, utility companies, city planners, civil engineers, building suppliers, real estate agencies and anyone who may impact the planning, development, use and maintenance of buildings are a target audience for the game. The goal of connecting with this audience is that they exercise distributed, but shared responsibility in building design, construction, use and maintenance to positively impact the economic, environmental, inhabitancy and systemic performance of a building. It is proposed that a transmedia game experience be created to address target audience 1: young adults 17-24. The game design is detailed in the remainder of this document. The proposed solution for target audience 2: municipalities, builders, utilities, city planners and anyone who may impact the development, use and maintenance of buildings is a digital portal to include the following: ● ● ● ● © 2013 A municipality’s total Smarter City score based on smart buildings, contractor readiness and the municipality’s residents’ scores/performances in the Smarter City game (target audience 1 solution). A municipality’s score on Smarter City elements/categories. The ability for a municipality to compare its scores with other municipalities in the state, country and around the world, including comparing to municipalities that are similar to it in population, infrastructure and size. A planner and contractor portal that promotes Smarter City education and communication. CONFIDENTIAL 5
  6. 6. LTMS 531 Design Document ● A resident/player (target audience 1) portal for score comparison, communication and connection to the municipality/planner/contractor portal. Game Goal The goal of the game is to connect choices made within the system to positively impact the economic, environmental, inhabitancy and systemic performance of a building. Instructional Strategy Target Audience Young adults, ages 17-24, that will influence public policy, make living and inhabiting decisions as city dwellers and support municipalities as voters and taxpayers are a target audience for the game. Some members of this audience may also find themselves as members of target audience 2 as they establish careers in the audience 2 fields and rise to leadership positions. The goal of connecting with this audience is that they make good decisions as building consumers and inhabitants and demand smart building rent and purchase options as city inhabitants. Learning Objectives 1. Coordinate the stakeholders in building design, construction, use, inhabitance, and maintenance. 2. Make decisions as a stakeholder in building design, construction, use, inhabitance and maintenance to positively impact the economic, environmental, inhabitancy and systemic performance of a building. 3. Make decisions as a stakeholder that will convert a current state building to an optimal future state to positively impact the economic, environmental, inhabitancy and systemic performance of a building. 4. Implement green initiatives and smarter building activities to positively impact building performance. 5. Consider building externalities as part of making decisions that impact building performance. 6. Select equipment that positively impacts a building’s performance. 7. Monitor the performance and interdependence of equipment in buildings as to whether it negatively or positively impacts the building performance and externalities. © 2013 CONFIDENTIAL 6
  7. 7. LTMS 531 Design Document Game Theme & Storyline Premise: As a new city resident you want to explore your surroundings. As you do, you learn more about your environment, you learn why your city should be a smart city and you begin to take a role in improving the city’s buildings and their environmental and economic impact. You must explore, build your skills, and consider support and opposition to make your city the smartest city in the world. Backstory: Like many cities in the world, the need for building renovation and new construction is being driven by an ever increasing population. Your city’s infrastructure is old, and renovation and new construction projects often don’t take into account how the existing approach can be improved through planning, communication and coordination. As a result, a recent worldwide municipalities survey has indicated that your city is the most negligent city in the world. You love your city and want to see it prosper. What can you do to make your city smarter? Theme: Can a single citizen make an impact on a city’s evolution while balancing the environmental and financial impact and at the same time keep all constituents satisfied? Setting: The setting for the game will be a generic city environment. Plot and Gameplay Summary: As a new resident of your city, you need to explore your surroundings. As you do, you uncover the environmental and financial impacts of the buildings around you. The more you uncover, the larger an area you can explore until you can move about the entire city. Your depth and breadth of exploration gives you increased status in the community and increased impact as a citizen, community organizer and voter. As your status increases you receive assignments that involve you in building maintenance, city planning, contractor communication and building approval. At the same time, you receive push and pull from friends, family, government officials, contractors and community organizations to make decisions based on their point-of-view. You need to balance the community’s point-of-view with the need for a smarter city. Your goal is to earn badges that indicate your knowledge of the impacts, challenges and requirements for building a smarter city, collect points that can be traded for real world status indicators and prizes, and impact your real-world municipality’s Smarter City status through your performance in the game. The ultimate goal is that the player becomes engaged in activities that impact the city by first identifying and addressing issues that are more impactful on them as the individual player. The player’s rise to leadership may be one that is unwilling or unwittingly assumed in the game. Gameplay Environment: This will be a transmedia experience for players through web-based gameplay, an online information portal, social media communication and real-world status indicators and prizes. © 2013 CONFIDENTIAL 7
  8. 8. LTMS 531 Design Document Character Information Learner Role The learner will choose from among several options to play as the player character. Before choosing the player character the learner will complete a series of profile questions, the results of which will point them toward one player character, in favor of the others. The player will have the option to choose the suggested player character or to choose from among the other player character options. Player character options include soccer mom, environmental activist, young Republican, new college grad or hipster. Player Characters All the player characters live in the same residence. Characters that are not chosen by the learner as the player character will become non-player characters (NPCs) that the player character may interact with in the game. Soccer Mom About the Character: Alice Kramden is a single, middle aged mother of two boys. Her week days are filled with a part-time job at the local coffee house and volunteering for various community events. While her weekends center around the boys various sports and social activities, she makes time for herself, when she can, prefers watching CNN and listening to NPR over reading the WSJ. She loves her neighborhood, her neighbors, and a close circle of friends. The family owns one older car and tries to keep the noise down in the early evening. Game Role: Protagonist/Hero Environmental Activist About the Character: The Environmental activist, or “Enviro-punk”, is a strong advocate for all components of nature. Though their ideas and demeanor can sometimes be considered radical or even misanthropic, they ultimately strive to make waves for the greater good. Young, brash and outspoken, but not unwilling to listen to others, the Enviropunk actively seeks the betterment of not only themselves, but of those around them, and of course mother nature. Game Role: Protagonist/Hero. The role of the Environmental activist is to get to the heart of what is hurting the environment they live in - and to make a change of any kind for the better. Young Republican About the Character: Dan is in his early 30’s, college graduate with a wife and child. He is tall and good looking. He is articulate and charismatic. He owns a manufacturing company. He is passionate about politics and keeping the government out of his way and lowering taxes. He is tired of taxes and © 2013 CONFIDENTIAL 8
  9. 9. LTMS 531 Design Document regulations . He was recently told that the price of one of his parts was doubling because the supplier had new EPA regulations he had to comply with ran the prices up. He hasn’t been able to expand his business or hire new employees because he hasn’t been able to get the loans he needs. Game Role: Protagonist/Hero New College Grad About the Character: Character is a new college graduate that just moved into the building. He/she is in their early-mid 20’s with an entry level job. Times are tough and student loans are expensive to pay back and the grad is very concerned with reducing the cost of living while still being able to enjoy his home. The Grad’s role is to try and find ways to cut utility bill costs. This character is energetic and excited to help out his fellow neighbors by putting his talents and ideas to work. The Grad is friendly and social, wanting to reach out to his neighbors in an effort to help make everyone’s life a little easier. Game Role: Protagonist/Hero The Hipster About the Character: Taylor Dunworthy is a social media and web marketing professional who likes to start new trends, or at least get in on the early stages of trend setting. Once a trend is established though, Taylor is on to the next best thing. He/she likes the social media and web marketing job , but also wishes there was more flexibility in the work schedule including optional work locations. Taylor likes the neighborhood he/she lives in, but she is rarely home. He/she considers himself/herself a whole city person and doesn’t stay close to home or keep up-to-date with building or neighborhood issues that much. Game Role: Protagonist/Hero © 2013 CONFIDENTIAL 9
  10. 10. LTMS 531 Design Document Non-Player Characters Marvin Vonneworth About the Character: Marvin is a semi-successful, middle-aged writer who teaches English and Creative Writing at the local community college. His surly demeanor makes it difficult to get to know him, although he is always liberal with a “hello” as well as a question about noises coming from your apartment. He questions the player’s actions in the early stages of the game, but eventually realizes the benefits for him as a result of the player’s exploration and actions towards a smarter apartment building. Game Role: Co-Protagonist / Ally Other non-player character types:     © 2013 Landlord/Building Official Small Business Owner School Official Township Official CONFIDENTIAL 10
  11. 11. LTMS 531 Design Document Gameplay Game Structure The game begins with the player character moving in to his/her new apartment building. The player is given choices on where to park and how to enter the building and traverse the floors to the apartment. As the player makes his/her way to the new apartment he/she is presented with observable items (like a broken safety light, inefficient lighting, lack of security, open windows, open doorways, water dripping/running, etc.) that could have an impact on the efficiency, safety and sustainability of the building. The player is not asked to interact with the observable items as they move in. They are to signify the status of the building and signify the status of the city at the beginning of the game. The changing status of the items will represent progress in the game at a later stage. Move in to the apartment (Introduction) a. Parking 1. Park in garage 2. Park in street b. Enter the building and go to your apartment (no badging) 1. Take the stairs 2. Take the elevator c. Enter the hallway and walk to your apartment 1. Open window 2. Open doorways 3. Hear a toilet running or water dripping d. Enter apartment (lights left on or pitch dark and difficult to find switch) Note: As the player moves into the building he/she sees something about the building that hints to issues. Note: Somewhere in the scenes and/or feedback display there’s an indicator that your city is the most neglected city in the world. The game progresses with the player making decisions as part of living out his/her daily life at work, home and play. One of the first interactions might be selecting a takeout restaurant from which to order the first meal in the new apartment (give the learner a choice of the type of restaurant). In this scenario, as the player character waits for the food to be delivered, he/she interacts with nonplayer characters in the building and receives feedback about the timeliness, cost and quality of food service delivery in the area. At a variable point, the game fast-forwards to a time in the future well beyond the expected time of food delivery. When the food arrives, it is cold and ends up costing more than one would expect for takeout food and delivery. The player is given options that include doing nothing, calling the restaurant to complain or talking to one of the non-player characters in the building. Doing nothing will negatively impact the player’s status and progress. Talking to a non-player character will provide additional information and direction, © 2013 CONFIDENTIAL 11
  12. 12. LTMS 531 Design Document (resources) but no additional status or progress. Contacting the restaurant to complain will lead to the player character visiting the restaurant to investigate the problems the owner reveals during the call. In the restaurant the player will be able to talk with the owner and investigate areas of the restaurant building and operations that might be impeding the restaurant’s efficiency and revenue/expense needs, including items that might impact the facilities energy efficiency, equipment servicing and maintenance, space utilization and the reduction of solid waste. Other in-apartment and out-of-apartment scenarios will evolve around laundry/dry cleaning, grocery shopping, work productivity and entertainment activities. As the player character solves building-relate problems related to his/her daily life his/her influence on and responsibility for smart building choices in the apartment building, the surrounding community and the city will increase. General Mechanics ● Choose an activity ● Choose to address an issue ● Explore the building, neighborhood or city for challenges to becoming a smart building/city (darkened buildings have issues). Buildings with challenges are highlighted in early levels, but more exploration to discover challenges is required in more advanced levels of gameplay ● Ask NPCs questions/have conversation to get more information about an issue ● Ask NPCs questions/have conversation to get more information to help in addressing challenges ● Investigate to discover building challenges (scan, move, click) ● Make decisions to solve problems, based on available assets (knowledge/cost/time/resources). Some decisions are better than others and will result in full points, status and resource rewards. ● A problem-solved for one building is then solved for all similar buildings (i.e. only have to solve waste disposal for restaurants one time) ● Receive points, status and assets in the game for successful gameplay. Assets can also be collected by discovering them in the gameplay environment. ● Successful gameplay results in increased resources for the building that you live in that can be applied to making your building a smarter building. ● Receive real-world rewards for successful gameplay ● Individual gameplay status is posted on the municipality portal and impacts municipality status among all participating municipalities © 2013 CONFIDENTIAL 12
  13. 13. LTMS 531 Design Document Game Progression The game progression indicates the primary interactions in the game and the interaction between the player character and the environment, assets, and non-player characters. The following graphics illustrate the primary components to be included in the game. You can link out to view a full scale flowchart on a web page. Opening Sequence http://www.webspirationclassroom.com/view/1410601a244ee © 2013 CONFIDENTIAL 13
  14. 14. LTMS 531 Design Document Life Interaction Sequence (Example) http://www.webspirationclassroom.com/view/1410610a38beb © 2013 CONFIDENTIAL 14
  15. 15. LTMS 531 Design Document Building Interaction Sequence (Example) http://www.webspirationclassroom.com/view/1411595af4f8 Game Balance As the player encounters challenges in the game they will have an opportunity to reject a challenge or engage in a challenge through two separate paths (see 8B and 8C in the Life Interaction sequence above). The player is not able to fix every building challenge that is found. The ability to make changes to a building to improve performance is based on available player assets. The player also can’t fix everything in a building without penalty, based on the fact that fixing everything would unbalance the cost-benefit factor of building performance (i.e. a building can be operating efficiently from an energy and environment management perspective, but not a cost perspective). Challenges in the building are not overtly apparent. Players need to explore areas of the building to locate opportunities for improvement. The items to interact with will react differently to user exploration (on rollover) to reveal the problem/challenge as players explore. Assets can be discovered as the player explores the gameplay environment as well as received through successful gameplay. Interaction with NPC players at the business/non-residence building may not reveal the truth or fully reveal the challenges of the business/building. Valuable responses will be based on the questions that players select to ask the NPC players in the business/non-residence building and a variable output of responses. © 2013 CONFIDENTIAL 15
  16. 16. LTMS 531 Design Document A building manager NPC can decide not to apply a change to the building. The player then needs to construct an argument from a fact/argument library to change the building manager’s mind. There is a building manager for the apartment building. Ongoing gameplay and an increasing level of challenge can be achieved by the player moving to a new building and area of the city (with more challenging building analysis) as they achieve a high level of status in their neighborhood, high points in the game or a high inventory of assets. Moving to a new building and area of the city will require the player to work on improving their new residence as well as rebuild his/her level of influence. Player Type Balance All player type preferences are addressed through various gameplay elements. Achievers ● Points ● Asset inventory ● Apartment (residence) building status ● City status ● Player status ● Player status on the portal Explorers ● Ability to play as various player character types with varying gameplay experiences and dialogue ● Options in life interaction & building interaction ● Ability to explore buildings and the neighborhood ● Ability to find hidden assets during exploration as well as receive assets from successful gameplay ● Variable gameplay in certain interactions (e.g. asset inventory restrictions, NPC interactions) Socializers ● Interactions with other tenants (NPCs) in the building residence ● Interactions with business/buildings NPCs to investigate the building challenges ● Interaction with other players and the municipality through the game portal ● Ability to post gameplay status updates on social media ● Automated communication from the game engine when gameplay ceases for three (3) consecutive days Killers ● Player status on the portal including a global leaderboard, municipality leaderboard and more granular player status/activity leaderboards © 2013 CONFIDENTIAL 16
  17. 17. LTMS 531 Design Document Game Technology & Functionality The game will function in both mobile (Android, Microsoft & iOS) and desktop environments through the use of HTML5 and responsive design. The game will include audio, but should be playable while on mute or without audio capabilities. Players should be able to save gameplay to continue with an existing player character as well as continue by selecting a different player character. Saved gameplay status for each player will connect to the municipality portal and the global gameplay portal. A total points/status leaderboard will be displayed as well as specific leaderboards for more granular player status/activity. Players should be able to post gameplay status updates to social media from within the game and from the portal. The portal will display messages (based on player status or municipality activity/status) prompting the player to post specific messages to social media from the portal. A goal of the game is ongoing gameplay over a long period of time. Extended gameplay is needed to change knowledge and attitudes about the personal impact resulting from a lack of energy and environment management activities in buildings as well as the individual influence that can be applied to make change in the player’s city. To facilitate ongoing gameplay over an extended period the game/portal engine will message players with storyline advancement/activity or comparative score/status information if the player hasn’t engaged with the game or portal in three (3) days. Tracking & Scoring There will be several tracking and scoring indicators that give the player a sense of overall progress as well as building residence and business/building status and progress. Player status will be indicated by a color indicator, an icon, a label and a sub-label (displayed on rollover of status indicator) including: Orange = beginner Yellow = intermediate Blue = advanced The color of player status can be a combination of levels (i.e. status color might be orange/yellow or yellow/blue). The status formula will be calculated based on total points, total interactions, efficiency in gameplay, and social media interaction. The sub-label will indicate current influence status/level, a general statement about improvement needed and a random fact about building energy and environment management. Total points will also be displayed. Points are accumulated at every decision point in the game, including interaction with NPCs. More points are awarded for better and more efficient decisions. Points cannot © 2013 CONFIDENTIAL 17
  18. 18. LTMS 531 Design Document be deducted in the game and points are cumulative gameplay points. Status and asset level can be negatively impacted by gameplay, but not points. Residence building status will also be indicated throughout the game to indicate how smart the building is that the PC lives in. Resources to improve the building status are collected through successful gameplay. When collected, the resources can be applied, at the discretion of the player, to improve the building status. The player will have access to assets that he/she can apply to a business/building to address a challenge. The asset inventory will consist of finances, technology, expertise and regulation. Regulation may be a positive asset or a negative asset, depending on the challenge being addressed. The asset inventory is a resource repository that will function like an internal, interdependent marketplace. Finances can be exchanged for technology and expertise and regulation may have an impact on finances, technology and expertise. Gameplay progress will connect to and be displayed on the portal. Gameplay points will translate into portal points that can be used to “buy” real-world products that will be supplied by sponsors of the portal. User Experience Interface The following sketch represents the major interface elements for a desktop environment. Functionality would be maintained on mobile platforms, but additional navigation and display levels would be required. A larger image size is available in the Appendix. © 2013 CONFIDENTIAL 18
  19. 19. LTMS 531 Design Document Graphic Treatment The following sample interfaces represent the type of graphical treatments that will serve as the inspiration for the game interface. Design elements will follow a realistic illustration style. The first image is from an existing IBM game interface and could serve as a model for the main navigation. The second image is a representation of what a neighborhood view might look like. © 2013 CONFIDENTIAL 19
  20. 20. LTMS 531 Design Document The example interface that follows represents the view when inside a building. The graphics should follow a realistic illustration style like the main interface scenes, but the in-building graphics should be simpler to allow players to investigate the space and find elements of the building that need to be improved to address the business/building problems being addressed. The character graphics should follow the style of the image on the right. A realistic illustration style should enable character emotion to be apparent. Character emotion will be displayed as the player character’s state is represented in the player character icon and when the player character interacts with non-player characters. © 2013 CONFIDENTIAL 20
  21. 21. LTMS 531 Design Document Use Cases The following use cases represent sample game interaction. Segment ID: 6 Game Segment: Life Interaction: Food delivery Summary of the Segment: In this segment, the character orders food from a local restaurant as their first meal after having moved in. Technical Gameplay: 1. Player selects the PC’s first life interaction after moving into the building (life interaction selected = order food) 2. Player selects which type of restaurant they would like to order from 3. Player places order with the restaurant Content: No learning content is embedded in this interaction. User Interaction/Experience in the Segment: The player is presented with a menu of life interactions at the top of the screen that can be scrolled through. After selecting ‘order food’ from the life interactions menu the player is with 3 restaurant options to choose from. The restaurant options include the name of the restaurant, the order and the cost of the order. Segment ID: 7 Game Segment: Life Interaction: Waiting for food delivery Summary of the Segment: In this segment, the learner can select from a variety of options as they wait for their food delivery. During these interactions the learner gains more information about the building and/or city .The player can also choose to fast forward to the time of food delivery. Technical Gameplay: 1. While waiting, the PC can walk around the apartment to explore 2. After the expected time for food delivery has passed (45 minutes = 45 seconds in game play) the player is presented with a menu of interaction options, including fast forward the scene. 3. The player selects to go down to the front desk of the apartment to ask the doorman if the delivery has been dropped off at the desk © 2013 CONFIDENTIAL 21
  22. 22. LTMS 531 Design Document 4. When the PC asks the NPC doorman if the delivery has been dropped off, a conversation results. The NPC asks the PC where the delivery is from. When the PC answers, the NPC reveals information about the restaurant delivery and the cost of the food at the restaurants in the neighborhood. The pace of the dialogue is controlled by the player, but the dialogue content is pre-scripted. Content:     Energy efficiency Equipment servicing and maintenance Space utilization Solid waste reduction User Interaction/Experience in the Segment: The player is able to explore the apartment building and interact with various items in the room by rolling over them for introductory information and clicking on them for more detail. More detail will display in a pop-up window that overlays the main scene. This functionality will mimic what the player will do when exploring businesses/buildings to identify areas for improvement. The player will also have a menu available to the right of the main scene where he/she can choose to interact with non-player characters to get more information about the building, the neighborhood and the city that will support learning and future interactions in the game. To interact with a non-player character the player will rollover the character icon to get some introductory information about the NPC. If the player wishes to “talk” with the NPC, he/she will click on the character icon. The back-andforth dialogue will display in a pop-up window over top the main scene. Throughout the discussion the player will have options to select from that will represent the player dialogue. The NPC will display prescripted reactions to player dialogue selections. © 2013 CONFIDENTIAL 22
  23. 23. LTMS 531 Design Document References "Urban Development." Data. N.p., n.d. Web. 08 Oct. 2013., http://data.worldbank.org/topic/urbandevelopment http://www-01.ibm.com/software/solutions/soa/innov8/cityone/index.jsp http://seriousgamesmarket.blogspot.com/2011/11/world-bank-institute-serious-games-for.html http://seriousgamesmarket.blogspot.com/2011/03/serious-games-simulating-real-world.html http://www.nathaliepattier.fr/blog/?cat=7 © 2013 CONFIDENTIAL 23
  24. 24. LTMS 531 Design Document Appendix Interface Sketch © 2013 CONFIDENTIAL 24

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