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LTMS 510 Multiplayer Classroom Syllabus
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LTMS 510 Multiplayer Classroom Syllabus

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Example of a Multiplayer Classroom syllabus. Items highlighted in yellow are changes from traditional syllabus.

Example of a Multiplayer Classroom syllabus. Items highlighted in yellow are changes from traditional syllabus.

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  • Sorry I missed your comments here Robert. This is a 1X per week course that can be taken online. It will next run in spring 2015. I'll email you more details about our program separately.
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  • Mr. A. Petroski,

    I wonder if this course can be taken online? If not is there a 1X per week course or possible Saturday. I am very interested. I am current teaching full time but am going to organize similar class in my classroom hopefully this fall but no later than Winter/Spring 1/2 year. R. Schlichtmann@philasd.org
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  • 1. LTMS 510.01 Learning Technologies and Solutions (3 credits) Spring 2014 http://harrisburgu.adobeconnect.com/ltms510sp2014/ INSTRUCTOR AND CONTACT INFORMATION: Instructor: Andy Petroski Office Phone: 717-901-5167 Cell Phone: 717-649-3035 Email: apetroski@harrisburgu.edu Office Hours: By Appointment Corporate Affiliation: Harrisburg University, Director of Learning Technologies and Assistant Professor of Learning Technologies LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/pub/0/176/315 Slideshare: http://www.slideshare.net/apetroski Twitter: @apetroski COURSE DESCRIPTION: Learning Technologies and Solutions: LTMS 510 This course presents an overview of multiple technology-based solutions to realize learning outcomes. Beyond a survey of learning software, the course challenges students to think broadly about emerging technology trends that present opportunities. By establishing a systematic decision analysis process, students will be able to assess suitable technology tools for specific environments and learning needs. A broad survey of open source and proprietary solutions will be explored as well as emerging trends in learning technologies. Course topics are examined within a framework of a learning strategy and a learning architecture. COURSE DELIVERY METHOD: This course will be delivered through online synchronous communication and online asynchronous communication. This course is designed as a multiplayer game. The goal of the game is to traverse the world of learning technologies and gain enough experience points (XP) to advance inad the game. At the beginning of the course every student in the class will choose and name their avatar. You will play the game as an individual but also participate in some game play as part of a guild. Guild membership will be determined based on final class size. Guilds will play based on the assigned zone at the beginning of most classes. Each guild will be composed of the following roles: sage (project manager), architect (instructional designer), conjurer (multimedia producer), sculptor (graphic designer), artisan (developer) or gatekeeper (quality assurance). Class time will be divided between exploring new lands (demos, investigation and site visits), completing quests (creating a question, answering a question, adding a bookmark, commenting on a bookmark, playing -1-
  • 2. games and simulations), crafting (blogs, podcasts, ebook chapters, wiki content, mind maps and PechaKucha presentations), guild challenges (scenarios and PechaKucha presentations) and dialogue (presentations, lecture and discussions) COURSE / DEGREE PRE-REQUISITES:  BA/BS Degree or POI MINIMUM PRE-REQUISITE SKILLS:  Basic computer skills  Basic search engine experience  Experience completing web forms  Basic software download and installation experience  Graduate level writing, presentation, and communication skills COURSE GOALS AND OBJECTIVES: Course Goal: After completing this course students will be able to select appropriate learning technologies to achieve desired learning outcomes and will have a foundation to support successful management, design, and development of learning technology solutions. Course Objectives:       List and describe domains of learning related to desired learning outcomes Consider goal, audience and technology analysis to aid in selecting appropriate learning technologies Consider learning technology selection within a learning technology architecture Describe the strengths, weaknesses and considerations of various learning technologies Systematically identify, evaluate, and select learning technologies Identify and discuss future learning technology solutions and implications TEXTBOOKS AND OTHER COURSE MATERIALS: A TEXTBOOK IS NOT REQUIRED FOR THIS COURSE  Book excerpts as assigned  Articles as assigned  Reports as assigned  Open Educational Resources (OER) Course page: Access the course site at http://moodle.harrisburgu.edu/ LTMS Laptop Requirement: -2-
  • 3.  Students enrolled in Harrisburg University of Science and Technology’s degree programs are required to have a laptop computer in order to complete specific course requirements.  If you already have a laptop and want to continue using it at Harrisburg University, please be aware of the minimum required specifications for the LTMS program. Information can be found on the LTMS web site (http://www.harrisburgu.edu/academics/graduate/learning-technologies/ltms-laptopreq.php).  Minimum requirements for connecting to the HU wireless network can also be found on the HU web site (http://www.harrisburgu.edu/campuslife/technology/faq/wireless_network_req.php). COURSE COMPETENCIES: 1. Critical Thinking       Select appropriate learning technologies based on desired learning outcomes, audience analysis, and technology analysis Systematically evaluate learning technologies Consider the similarities and differences among learning technologies and their uses in K-12, higher education and business Think about learning technologies beyond standard uses Evaluate the wide reaching impact of learning technologies on the instructor, the student, the organization, and society Consider future learning technologies, potential uses, and ultimate impact 2. Communication       Post thoughts about and experiences with learning technologies on a blog Respond to instructor and student Moodle posts in writing to expand upon points made or present alternate points-of-view Present information about learning technologies Create podcasts for learning Discuss learning technologies in class and online Ask questions of learning technology professionals 3. Teamwork and Collaboration     Work in groups as directed by the instructor to present information and complete assignments Work in a collaborative online environment to contribute to an online learning technologies wiki Work in guilds to create projects and defend solutions Work in pick-up groups to complete assignments and create projects 4. Entrepreneurship   Identify gaps in learning technologies solutions and discuss opportunities for filling gaps Discuss future technology advancements, their application to learning solutions, and their potential to be marketable products 5. Information Literacy -3-
  • 4.   Research and evaluate information about learning technologies Follow copyright law and fair use guidelines 6. Ethical Decision Making   Identify and evaluate security and privacy issues related to the use of learning technologies Follow intellectual copyright laws when creating instructional materials 7. Global Awareness    Consider how different cultures react to new ways of learning Identify ways in which learning technologies can impact the individual, the organization and the community Discuss the holistic impact learning technologies can have on personal success, organizational success, and social and environmental issues EVALUATION AND ASSESSMENT: You will start the game as a Level One avatar. Level Sixteen is the highest level you can achieve. Level XP* Letter Grade Level Sixteen 1695 A Level Fifteen 1470 A- Level Fourteen 1245 B+ Level Thirteen 1020 B Level Twelve 795 B- Level Eleven 653 C+ Level Ten 546 C Level Nine 439 C- Level Eight 332 D Level Seven 225 Level Six 189 Level Five 153 Level Four 117 Level Three 81 Level Two 45 Level One 0 F *Your level will be determined by experience points (XP). You gain XP by conducting raids, completing quests, crafting and collaborating with other game players as appropriate within the rules of the game. The XP indicated in parentheses is the available XP for each activity for each land. XP awarded will be based on quality. Full XP is not automatically rewarded just for completing the activity. -4-
  • 5. Crafting: Blog Post (20 XP for each) Crafting: Podcast (35 XP for each) Crafting: Wiki Post (20 XP for each) Crafting: Mind map (10 XP for each) Crafting: PechaKucha presentation (25 XP for each) Crafting: eBook Chapter (30 XP for each) Pickup Group: 2-Player crafting. YOU MUST LET THE GAME MASTER KNOW YOU PLAN TO PARTICIPATE IN A PICKUP GROUP. Players cannot team with a fellow guild member in a pickup group. Players cannot team with the same player in a pickup group more than twice. Each player in the pickup group will receive 50% of the XP awarded for the item that is crafted. (For example: if a pickup group crafts a podcast and receives 30 out of the possible 35 XP points for the podcast, each player in the pickup group receives 15 XP points for crafting the podcast in a pickup group.) Quest: Site visit (20 XP) (only available in certain lands) Quest: Create a question (15 XP) Quest: Answer a question (20 XP) Quest: Add a resource (20 XP) Quest: Comment on a resource (15 XP) Quest: Games & Simulation Play (25 XP for each) Conquer a Land: Craft every item and complete every available Quest in a land (50 XP) Raid Preparation: Guild scenario or PechaKucha preparation (75 XP for each player) Raid: Guild scenario or PechaKucha throw down (75 XP for each player in the winning Guild) Boss Battle: Learning Technologies Full Presentation (100 XP) Boss Battle: Learning Technologies Selection Report (150 XP) Power up with participation XP! There are 300 possible XP points for participation. You’ll earn participation XP each time you complete a quest, take part in crafting or participate in a guild challenge. The amount of participation XP received will depend on your performance in anyone of those tasks. You can also earn participation XP by the amount and quality of activity when exploring new lands and during dialogue. Failure to battle the bosses (learning technology selection report or learning technology presentation) will automatically reduce your level standing by three (3) levels for each boss you fail to battle. Full game play is expected. In addition to the expectation of battling both bosses, each player must craft at least one of every item and complete each of the quests at least once (except the site visit) at some point during game play. However, you cannot craft more than one of each item or more than one of any quest for each land. (For example, you CANNOT craft two podcasts for the Virtual Classroom land.) -5-
  • 6. Badges can also be earned through successful gameplay and establishing expertise in a certain topic. Badges don’t impact your XP but signify your expertise to the game community. The following badges can be earned in three stages: beginner, intermediate and experienced. Pivoteer (Management Systems) Plyer (Media) Strider Combinator Assembler (Online Learning (Social Learning (Virtual and OER) and Web 2.0) Classroom) Funerator (Games, Simulations & Gamification) Reconnoiter (Virtual Worlds) Conductor (Classroom Technology) Auditor (Assessment Technology) Benefactor (Assistive Technology) Substitutor (Alternative Devices) Fortune Teller (Future) Traveler Amplifier (Mobile Learning (Augmented | BYOT) Reality) PERFORMANCE CRITERIA: Your work will be evaluated according to the following general guidelines: Excellent: Exceptional effort. Individual was always prepared to discuss, present, and provide feedback. Work reflects consistent participation and engagement in a manner that reflects a deep interest in and understanding of the course content. Regular contributions are consistently thoughtful, constructive, and beneficial to all involved in the course. Assignments and projects are thoroughly and thoughtfully completed, always indicating additional work, insight, and integration of ideas. Assignments and projects are completed on time, according to requirements, and with a thorough understanding of how individual pieces of the course build upon and integrate with each other. Above Average: Good effort. Individual was often prepared to discuss, present, and provide feedback. Work reflects consistent participation and engagement in a manner that reflects an advanced interest in and understanding of the course content. The majority of contributions are consistently thoughtful, constructive, and beneficial to all involved in the course. Assignments and projects are thoroughly and thoughtfully completed, often showing some additional work, insight, or integration of ideas. Assignments and projects are completed on time, according to requirements, and with an understanding of how individual pieces of the course build upon and integrate with each other. Average: Basic Effort. Individual was sometimes prepared to discuss, present, and provide feedback. Work reflects consistent participation and engagement in a manner that reflects some interest in and understanding of the course content. Some contributions are thoughtful, constructive, and beneficial to all involved in the course. Assignments and projects are completed, occasionally showing some additional work, insight, or integration of ideas. Assignments and projects are completed on time, according to requirements, and with a basic understanding of how individual pieces of the course build upon and integrate with each other. Below Average: Lack of Effort. Individual was rarely prepared to discuss, present, and provide feedback. Work reflects some participation and engagement, but in a manner that reflects little interest in and understanding of the course content. A few contributions are thoughtful, constructive, and beneficial to all involved in the course. Assignments and projects are completed, but do not show additional work, insight, or integration of ideas. Assignments and projects are completed on time, but lack requirements and indicate little understanding of how individual pieces of the course build upon and integrate with each other. -6-
  • 7. LTMS 510 impacts the following Instructional Technology Specialist (ITS) Guidelines: 1A: Identification, selection, installation and maintenance of technology infrastructure, and hardware and software applications for school administration and instruction including:   Assessment of educational and administrative technological needs Assistive technology resources for students with special needs 1B: Integrating technology into curricular planning and instructional design including:    Research on and evaluation of existing and emerging technologies Access and use telecommunications for information sharing, remote information access and retrieval, and multi-media/hypermedia publishing Electronic mail and Internet resources for communications and instructional support 1C: Management and administration of technology programs at the building, district and regional levels including  Preparing presentations for parents, administrators, school boards, and the public 1D: Research, problem solving and product development of technological applications including   Emerging programming, authoring, and problem solving environments including team and collaborative projects such as on-line workgroups Designing and publishing on-line documents that present information and include links to critical resources 2A: Managing instructional technology services including   Creating an environment that fosters interest and growth in all aspects of technology Communicating high learning expectations IIIA: The professional education program provides evidence that Instructional Technology Specialist certification candidates demonstrate knowledge and competencies that foster professionalism in school and community settings including  Professional organizations, publications and resources Potential Instructional Technology Specialist ePortfolio Artifact(s):      Learning technology selection report Learning technologies presentation Learning technologies encyclopedia Evidence of online collaborative group work Evidence of online documentation and links to critical resources Chapter 49 Accommodations & Adaptations Fifty-seven (57) Chapter 49 Accommodations & Adaptations Curricular Elements for Instructional Technology Specialists are addressed in LTMS 510. See the Appendix for specific Accommodations & Adaptations Curricular Elements -7-
  • 8. PLAYER SUPPORT: Academic and Student Affairs Office Phone: 717-901-5139 Email: ldimino@harrisburgu.edu Student Success/Tutoring Center Phone: 717-901-5139 Email: ldimino@harrisburgu.edu Web: http://www.harrisburgu.edu/current-students/success/ Tech Support Phone: 717-901-5177 Email: helpdesk@harrisburgu.edu Web: http://www.harrisburgu.edu/campuslife/technology/helpdesk.php Library Access to proprietary databases Phone: 717-901-5188 Email: library@harrisburgu.edu Web: http://www.harrisburgu.edu/campuslife/library/ HONOR CODE: The HU Student Code of Conduct/Honor Code is found in the Student Handbook at http://www.harrisburgu.edu/current-students/. Students are expected to adhere to it at all times. LANDS & DELIVERABLES You can acquire XP and level up in any way you want. You can conquer a land by completing all of the available quests and crafting all of the items in a land. However, you cannot craft more than one of each item or more than one of any quest for each land. (For example, you CANNOT craft two podcasts for the Virtual Classroom land.)  Conquering four (4) lands along with high power up for participation and successful Boss Battles should advance you to a Level Sixteen (16) avatar.  Conquering three (3) lands along with high power up for participation and successful Boss Battles should advance you to a Level Fifteen (15) avatar.  Conquering two (2) lands along with high power up for participation and successful Boss Battles should advance you to a Level Fourteen (14) avatar.  Conquering one (1) land along with high power up for participation and successful Boss Battles should advance you to a Level Thirteen (13) avatar. Lands Management Systems | Media | Copyright | Multimedia | Online Tutorials | Online Courses | Open Educational Resources | Software Demos | Social Learning | Collaborative Online Software | Virtual Classroom | Virtual Computer Labs | Games | Simulations | Gamification | Virtual Worlds | Classroom Technology | Assessment Technology | Mobile Learning | Bring Your Own Technology (BYOT) | Augmented -8-
  • 9. Reality | Assistive Technology | Alternative Devices | Future GAMEPLAY SCHEDULE (subject to change to meet scheduling and player needs) The general structure of each gameplay session will include: Demos/Exploration (20 minutes) Quests (20 minutes) Guild Challenges (20 minutes) Crafting (20 minutes) Quest, Crafting or Boss Battle Presentation / Discussion (30 minutes) Land or Zone Discussion (20 minutes) Discourse Directed by the Game Master (30 minutes) The game play structure and schedule will remain flexible throughout the game. Zones Each guild will be randomly assigned a zone for most game play sessions. The assigned zone may determine the perspective through which a guild might battle in a guild challenge or participate in demos/exploration, topic discussion or discourse directed by the game master. The zones in play during any game play session may include:  River of Motivation  Woods of Recognition  Catacombs of Comprehension  The Application Mines  Palace of Analysis  Mount Creation Gameplay Session 1: January 8        Introductions About the course Game play Game resources Equipment, resources and other preparation Topic 1: Learning Strategy and Domains of Learning Topic 2: Analysis Reading: - Read eLearning Tools & Technologies, Chpt.19 (pgs.405-432) Activities: - Player survey - Select Learning Technology Presentation Topic (Boss Battle) - Create an avatar - Upload a photo and avatar Gameplay Session 2: January 15 -9-
  • 10.     Review Topic 1: Learning Technology Architecture Topic 2: Storyboarding Gameplay Gameplay Session 3: January 22   Learning Technology Selection Report (Boss Battle) Gameplay Assignments: - Learning Technology Selection Report: Phase 1 (Boss Battle) Gameplay Session 4: January 29  Gameplay Gameplay Session 5: February 5  Student Presentation (Boss Battle)  Student Presentation (Boss Battle)  Topic 1: Strategies and criteria for selecting tools  Topic 2: Use cases  Topic 3: Decision Analysis  Gameplay Reading: - Read How to Buy E-Learning Systems, Tools, and Services report; Writing a Use Case for Evaluation Purposes (pgs. 33-34) Gameplay Session 6: February 12  Student Presentation (Boss Battle)  Student Presentation (Boss Battle)  Topic 1: Use cases  Topic 2: Decision Analysis  Gameplay Gameplay Session 7: February 19     Student Presentation (Boss Battle) Student Presentation (Boss Battle) Learning Technology Selection Report (Boss Battle) Gameplay Assignments: - Learning Technology Selection Report: Phase 2, Part 1 (Boss Battle) - Mid-game Adjustment Evaluation Gameplay Session 8: February 26    Student Presentation (Boss Battle) Student Presentation (Boss Battle) Topic 1: Decision Analysis (cont.) - 10 -
  • 11.  Gameplay Assignments: - Learning Technology Selection Report: Phase 2, Part 2 (Boss Battle) Gameplay Session 9: March 5    Student Presentation (Boss Battle) Student Presentation (Boss Battle) Gameplay Assignments: - Learning Technology Selection Report: Phase 2, Part 3 (Boss Battle) SPRING BREAK: Week of March 10 Gameplay Session 10: March 19    Student Presentation (Boss Battle) Student Presentation (Boss Battle) Gameplay Gameplay Session 11: March 26    Student Presentation (Boss Battle) Student Presentation (Boss Battle) Gameplay Assignments: - Learning Technology Selection Report: Phase 2, Part 4 (Boss Battle) Gameplay Session 12: April 2    Student Presentation (Boss Battle) Student Presentation (Boss Battle) Gameplay Assignments: - Learning Technology Selection Report: Phase 3 (Boss Battle) Gameplay Session 13: April 9    Student Presentation (Boss Battle) Student Presentation (Boss Battle) Gameplay Gameplay Session 14: April 16   Student Presentation (Boss Battle) Student Presentation (Boss Battle) - 11 -
  • 12.     Learning Technology Selection Report Discussion (Boss Battle) Final evaluations Gameplay Debrief of gameplay - 12 -
  • 13. APPENDIX Fifty-seven (57) Chapter 49 Accommodations & Adaptations Curricular Elements for Instructional Technology Specialists are addressed in LTMS 510. Appendix I. Types of Disabilities and Implications for Learning  Demonstrate an understanding of and ability to support instructional personnel as they plan for: type, identification and characteristics of different types of disabilities, as well as effective, evidence-based instructional practices and adaptions. Examples:    Provide examples of technologies that could support instructional personnel in collaboration and information gathering; Provide information on the electronic resources available. Demonstrate an awareness of the legal right and responsibilities of the teacher related to special education referral and evaluation and the rights and procedural safeguards that students are guaranteed. Examples:    Know where to find updated electronic information on the legal rights and responsibilities; Provide stakeholders with a way to obtain the information using technology. Demonstrate an awareness of possible causes and implications of overrepresentation of minorities in special education to avoid misinterpretation of behaviors that represent cultural, linguistic differences as indicative of learning problems. Examples:    Know where to find updates electronic information on minority/cultural issues as they relate to special education; Provide stakeholders with a way to obtain the information using technology; Provide examples of various ways that minorities and cultural groups respond to technology, e.g. some impoverished populations often feel empowered. II. Cognitive Skill Development to Ensure Achievement of Students with Disabilities in Standards Aligned System to include All School Environments  Cognitive – Delineate how individuals acquire and process information. Design learning environments to facilitate encoding, storage and retrieval of knowledge and information for memory, attention, perception, action, and problem solving. Example:   Provide examples of technologies that facilitate the specific learning goal. Specify the experiences children need from birth to age eight to prepare them to learn, read and succeed in school - 13 -
  • 14. Example   Provide examples of appropriate technology use (beyond just computer applications). Identify early interaction with adults and peers, the early childhood education teaching methods and curriculu, and comprehensive early childhood interventions that support learning and development, specifically in domains that prepare children from diverse backgrounds for kindergarten and the early grades. Example:   Provide examples of appropriate technology use for children, e.g. computer, TV, and electronic games that include diverse cultures and a multilingual understanding of reading and math. Be aware of instructional technologies that can assist instructional personnel in adapting instruction for patterns of typical physical developmental milestones and how patterns of students with disabilities may be different, and provide information about technologies that can assist instructional personnel in planning effectively for possible accommodations and/or modifications which may be necessary to implement effective instructional practices. Examples:    Know where and when to get access to assistive technologies specialists Identify ways traditional technologies (in contrast to assistive technologies) can be adapted to accommodate learners (i.e. built-in magnifiers, text-to-speech, on-screen keyboard). Recognize areas of development for students with disabilities including awareness of: interpersonal processes, forming and maintaining relationships (including parent-child, caregiver, peer, friend, sibling) and attachment models and their effects on learning. Examples:    Know where to find updated electronic information the development of students with disabilities Describe ways that technologies can be used to maintain and/or enhance relationships for learning (e.g. student posting work – audio, video, or text – on the web, receiving feedback from others, etc.) Support instructional personnel’s use of technology as they apply principles in social competence, social withdrawal, social role formation and maintenance, and prosocial behaviors, and aggression as they affect learning. Example:   Identify ways that electronic communication can empower and negatively affect social behaviors (i.e. social networking). Assist in the application of principles of early learning to language development in the following areas: language comprehension, language expression, language form and syntax, morphology and semantics as it relates to technology. - 14 -
  • 15. Example:   Know how to access assistive technology specialists. Provide professional development to instructional personnel/administrators and have an understanding that technology exists to apply and teach skills of spoken language as a precursor of reading and academic development. Example:   Identify traditional technologies that could aid in the application of early language development, (e.g. text-to-speech, podcasting, student recording, talking books, and using multimedia available in schools). Support instructional personnel as they implement positive behavioral interventions based on a functional analysis of behavior. Example:   Work with special education personnel to identify technology tools that might support functional behavioral analysis. Through the use of technology, support instructional personnel as they create an optimal learning environment by utilizing, evaluating, modifying and adapting the technology appropriate to classroom, curricula, teaching strategies, materials, and equipment. Examples:    Provide examples of ways technology could be used to enhance curriculum for particular content areas Identify technologies that could be used to meet a particular learning goal Identify effective co-planning and co-teaching strategies Example:   Identify technology tools that can be used for collaboration (e.g. email, Google Docs, shared drive/network) Assist instructional personnel with technologies available to them to identify instructional levels of students through collaboration with members of the IEP team. Examples:    Identify websites that provide information about differentiated text resources Support instructional personnel as they need to collaborate with others and their use of technology Understand the role of the general educator as part of the team for transition planning across transition points (i.e., preschool to school entry, grade level to grade level, school to school, to post school outcomes.) - 15 -
  • 16. Example:   Help identify the way technologies could be used for planning across transition points, i.e., tracking, using database or software. Demonstrate an understanding of the meaningful roles that parents and students play in the development of the student’s education program Example:   Help identify the way technologies could be used for developing communication (e.g., a website, grade tracking, or email communication) Demonstrate an understanding of how technology may be used to support student and family communication and meaningful participation into the student’s educational program. Example:  Provide technologies so students’ homework is accessible from home computers; III. Assessments  Formative Assessment – Classroom-based assessments that allow teachers to monitor and adjust their instructional practice in order to meet the individual needs of their students. Example:  Demonstrate ways to use digital student response systems, i.e. clickers, CPS units, for formative assessments;  Show ways to use on-line games and quizzes for getting data on student performance, i.e. Study Island, free on-line sites;  Create a Digital Presentation (PPT) that uses assessment questions throughout formative assessment;  Know the limits of digital assessment tools for ascertaining student understanding of a concept.  Demonstrate the use of technology to support instructional personnel’s use of formal and informal assessment data for instructional, behavioral, and possible eligibility for special education based on the type of assessment, level of the students being assessed, and the purpose of the quality of instruction. Examples:    Share technology tools that could be used for different types of assessments Share on-line resources for more information about each topic Systematically monitor student performance to identify areas of need. Examples:   Show ways to monitor student performance electronically; Share various ways that different technology may assist in the process. - 16 -
  • 17.  Support instructional personnel’s use of technology as they use evaluative data on an individual, class and district level to identify and implement instructional and/or programmatic revisions for quality improvement. Example:  Identify software or programs that could assist with evaluating the data. IV. Literacy Development and Instruction in Core and Intervention Areas  Match instructional research-validated literacy interventions to identified student needs. Example:   Identify software or technology tools for the instructional personnel. Demonstrate a conceptual understanding of the components of reading and describe how these areas pose challenges for students with disabilities (Phonological Awareness & Phonics, Fluency, Vocabulary, Comprehension, Language, Word Study) Example:   Identify possible software, on-line games, or other technology tools from which instructional personnel may choose. Demonstrate an ability to review and evaluate literacy programs for purpose, quality, effectiveness and research-base and show knowledge of commonly available programs. Examples:    Evaluate, with instructional personnel, the effectiveness of the technology resources of the literacy programs Supply information on effective uses of technology for literacy programs. Identify evidence-based instructional practices to be used with students with disabilities in the area of literacy. Example:   Identify useful practices (e.g., enlarging the font, using screen readers, using a tracking device for reading) Demonstrate an understanding of the evidence-based connection between literacy and behavior. Example:  Identify how technology may be used in the classroom to enhance students’ literacy in ways that help to enhance their engagement with the content under study and foster greater classroom participation - 17 -
  • 18.  Demonstrate a conceptual understanding of the components of writing and describe how these areas pose challenges for students with disabilities (Text production, Spelling, Composition for different types of writing). Example:   Provide instructional personnel with online activities that help simulate the experience of students with learning disabilities. Clearly articulate and model the use of explicit and systematic instruction in the teaching of literacy (reading and writing) for students with disabilities across all reading levels. Example:   Show technology tools that help address systematic creation of lessons (e.g. Nettrekker evaluates websites on reading levels). Demonstrate instructional strategies to enhance comprehension of material. Example:   Show technology tools that help address reading challenges (e.g., Nettrekker has read-aloud feature, Web Anywhere reads web pages, PDF can all be read aloud, using a concept mapping tool allows student to easily create pictures of content and show relationships.) Demonstrate an understanding of challenges that students with specific disabilities face in content area literacy. Examples:    Identify technology-based simulations that help instructional personnel to experience the reading challenges; Identify online resources that can help instructional personnel understand content area literacy challenges Students with disabilities face. Assess the readability of content area reading materials. Examples:     Demonstrate for instructional personnel how work processing software may be used to assess the readability of a document; Show instructional personnel Nettrekker and how the search engine evaluates the reading ability needed for a website; Identify software that addresses the same content on multiple reading levels. Demonstrate the ability to adapt content area material to the student’s instructional level Examples:  Demonstrate for instructional personnel how to use technology to adapt materials by creating a PDF and having material read aloud to students - 18 -
  • 19.  Utilize assessment tools with appropriate accommodations in the area of literacy to identify effectiveness of the standards based curriculum (core literacy program for students with disabilities) Example:   Describe how technology may be used to accommodate literacy needs of learners (i.e. reading printed text for learners or providing linked clarifications or scaffolds to support leaners’ literacy needs.) Establish and maintain progress monitoring practices aligned with the identified needs of each student to adjust instruction and provide rigor in the area of literacy for students with disabilities. Example:   Identify technology tools that instructional personnel can use to monitor student progress; Identify appropriate online resources that address student progress monitoring and best practices in literacy instruction for students with disabilities. V. Effective Instructional Strategies for Students with Disabilities in Inclusive Settings  Identify effective instructional strategies to address areas of need. Examples:    Describe how technology may be used to enhance the effectiveness of instruction for students with special needs; Identify online resources that support instructional personnel’s understanding of how to select appropriate instructional strategies for students with disabilities. Scaffold instruction to maximize instructional access to all students. Examples:    Identify technology tools that can be used to scaffold instruction; Identify online resources that address techniques for scaffolding instruction to enhance its effectiveness for students with disabilities. Provide feedback to students at all levels to increase awareness in areas of strength, as well as areas of concern. Examples:  Describe how an instructional technology specialist should design professional development for instructional personnel so they can use technology to enhance the quality and effectiveness of feedback they provide to students (i.e., various highlighting techniques to direct student attention, inserted comments and notes in word processing documents, inserted audio clips in word processing documents, and embedding links to online resources that can help students in documents); - 19 -
  • 20.   Identify online resources that support instructional personnel’s understanding of best practices in the use of feedback to enhance instruction for all learners. Strategically align standard based curriculum with effective instructional practices. Example:   Identify online resources that support instructional personnel’s understanding of best practices in matching instructional techniques to standards-based curriculum. Identify and implement instructional adaptations based on evidence-based practices (demonstrated to be effective with students with disabilities) to provide curriculum content using a variety of methods without compromising curriculum intent. Example:   Identify online resources that support instructional personnel’s understanding of how to select appropriate instructional methods of adapting instruction without compromising curricular intent. Design and implement programs that reflect knowledge, awareness and responsiveness to diverse needs of students with disabilities Example:   Identify online resources that support instructional personnel’s understanding of the diverse needs of students with disabilities. Use research supported methods for academic and non-academic instruction for students with disabilities. Examples:    Identify research-supported methods for using technology to support instruction for students with disabilities; Identify online resources that support instructional personnel’s understanding of appropriate research-based methods. Develop and implement universally designed instruction Examples:    Describe what universal design in technology-supported instruction is and its consequences for use of technology in instruction, particularly with students with disabilities; Identify online resources that instructional personnel may use to gain a better understanding of universal design for instruction. Demonstrate an understanding of the range and the appropriate use of assistive technology (i.e., no tech, low tech, high tech). Examples: - 20 -
  • 21.   Describe how assistive technology may be used to support instruction for students with disabilities; Describe how an instructional technology specialist can work with instructional personnel to help them identify the appropriate level of technology for use with a student with disabilities (i.e. no tech, low tech, high tech) I. Foundations for Preservice Candidates  Identify sociocultural characteristics of ELLs including educational background and demographics Example:   Identify online resources that can enhance instructional personnel’s understanding of the role of culture in classroom behavior, academic performance and progress of ELLs. Describe how ELLs’ cultural communication styles and learning styles affect the learning process. Example:   Identify online resources that can enhance instructional personnel’s understanding of how culture affects the communication and learning styles of ELLs. Describe how ELLs’ cultural values affect their academic achievement and language development. Example:   Identify online resources that can enhance instructional personnel’s understanding of how cultural values influence ELLs’ academic achievement and language development. Identify bias in instruction, materials and assessment. Example:   Identify online resources that can enhance instructional personnel’s understanding of how instruction, materials and assessments may reflect cultural bias and how to identify when this is the case. Demonstrate cross-cultural competence in interactions with colleagues, administrators, school and community specialists, students and their families. Example:   Identify potential cultural issues in using technology (particularly email and websites) for communication and identify best practices in cross-cultural communication. Observe culturally and/or linguistically diverse instructional settings. Example:  Identify online resources that can permit instructional personnel to observe culturally and/or linguistic instructional settings (e.g., video libraries, webcams,etc.) - 21 -
  • 22. II. Applications for Pre-service Candidates  Apply research, concepts and theories in language acquisition to instruction. Examples:    Identify research on how technology may best be used in instruction that reflects the theories, concepts, and research findings about language acquisition; Identify online resources that can help instructional personnel enhance their understanding of how to apply language acquisition theories, concepts and research to instruction. Implement appropriate research-based instructional strategies to make content comprehensible for all ELLs. Examples:     Describe how technology may be used to make content comprehensible for ELLs; Identify online resources that can help instructional personnel to support their effective instructional planning and assessment integrating the PA Language Proficiency Standards for English Language Learners PreK-12 (ELPS) and PA academic standards; Investigate reviews of type of sites, tools, software and technology. Use PA ELPS to design content assessment Example:   Describe how technology may be used to design instruction that reflects PA ELPS standards Describe the legal responsibilities related to serving ELLs Example:   Identify online resources that can help instructional personnel enhance their understanding of the legal responsibilities related to serving ELLs. Demonstrate collaborative, co-teaching models for serving ELLs. Example:   Identify online resources that can help instructional personnel enhance their understanding of models of collaborative, co-teaching of ELLs. Define common terms associated with English Language Learners. Example:   Identify online resources that can help all personnel access and understand terms associated with ELLs. Identify professional resources and organizations related to serving ELLs Example: - 22 -
  • 23.  Identify online resources that can help instructional personnel investigate terminology, standards, professional resources and professional organizations related to serving ELLs. - 23 -

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