<ul><li>LTMS 510 Learning Technologies and Solutions Class 9, Tuesday, March 16, 2010 </li></ul><ul><li>Review </li></ul><...
Review <ul><li>Virtual Classrooms </li></ul><ul><li>Virtual Labs </li></ul><ul><li>Podcasts </li></ul><ul><li>Use Cases & ...
Learning Technology Presentation
Reading / Viewing
BREAK
Games & Simulations Problem-Based Learning Activities Serious Games Immersive Learning Simulations Learning Games Mini-Games
Genres Games Hybrid Simulations <ul><li>Action </li></ul><ul><li>Fighting </li></ul><ul><li>Sports </li></ul><ul><li>3D sh...
Categories for Learning Simple Serious Software Physical Soft Skill Cause/Effect Game Simulation
 
Evaluation Assessment Learning Strategy Mgmt. Systems ----------------- Learning Technology Architecture -----------------...
eLearning Guild Report <ul><li>The Name Game </li></ul><ul><li>Results </li></ul><ul><li>Costs </li></ul><ul><li>Mobile Le...
Tools Adventure Maker PowerPoint Camtasia Firefly Lectora Toolbook SimWriter Raptivity Flash Captivate Sploder Torque 3D S...
Tools <ul><li>Simple Game  Serious Game </li></ul><ul><li>Simulation (software, physical skills, soft skills, spreadsheet ...
Decision Analysis  <ul><li>Kepner-Tregoe Model </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Criteria </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Possible Choices ...
BREAK
Games and Simulations
Games & Simulations Strengths Weaknesses Considerations
Flow: The Psychology of Optimal Experience Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi   Challenge Skill Flow Channel
Future
Assignments
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LTMS 510: Learning Technologies and Solutions - Class 9

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LTMS 510: Learning Technologies and Solutions; a class in the Learning Technologies Master of Science (LTMS) program at Harrisburg University of Science and Technology

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  • Note: Agenda – Display as students enter the room Review Student Presentation: Games Topic 1: Games Topic 2: Simulations Topic 3: Decision Analysis
  • Note: Review (10 minutes) 6:00-6:10PM Any question or any additional thoughts: Virtual Classrooms Virtual Labs Podcasts Use Cases &amp; Criteria Feedback on projects
  • Note: Games (25 minutes – 5 prep, 15 min. pres., 5 debrief) 6:10-6:35PM
  • Notes: 30 minutes, 6:35-7:05PM What were some of the benefits of games in education that were mentioned in the video? Were there any examples that you want to talk more about? Games in Education: View Technology in Education: Games • Context for learning • 21st century skills development – planning, communication, critical thinking • Think about complex systems • Games have moved beyond skill and drill • Different skillset for teachers in the classroom • Go to bed early if homework assignment is too hard, but play game. Worse thing about homework = too hard, Worse thing about game = too easy • Frustration is good . . . Learning happens in the ah-ha moment • Debrief of experience is important • Access experiences not otherwise available Game school opened in NYC in Fall 2009 http://q2l.org/ Quest to Learn, a new 6-12th grade public school that will use game-inspired methods to teach both traditional and critical 21st century skills and literacies. http://beta.learnwithfriends.com/Login.aspx Educational mini games, social interaction for PA Cyber students What were some examples of the value of serious games in training and development? This was somewhat eluded to in the article . . . But, have you guys heard about “learning to know, learning to do, learning to be” (expand upon this in relation to games/sims and virtual worlds) Read Getting Serious About Digital Games in Learning (pgs 2-5) -The name game (people don’t like the term game) -Development tools (Flash, Garage Games Torque Engine) -Talks about PDA serious games -Pg. 4: Comments by Dr. Mayo? (Learning by Doing, Learning by Experimenting, Life-like learning situations, Believing in abilities, Clear objectives, Team learning and skills, Learning without limitations) -Pg. 4: Value of serious games in corporations? (starting training, completing training, faster learning, more knowledgeable people, better retention over time, natural for younger learners, matches experience of younger learners, corporate image, increased learner motivation) Describe what a massively multiplayer game might look or feel like. Any questions about any of the examples in the reading? Massively Multiplayer Game – Horizon Report Like other kinds of games, educational MMOs combine a carefully crafted setting with specific educational objectives. What makes these games especially compelling and effective is their multiplayer nature—students can work in small or large groups, or can pursue goals solo, all in the context of a larger community of player-learners. Other possible interactions include mentoring of newer players by more experienced ones, competitive team activities, and collaborative world-building. What jumped out at you from the article as interesting or something you have a question about? Simulations Wikipedia Article Computer Simulation – what we’re probably most familiar with But, also Wooden Horse simulator from WWII Flight simulators are probably the best known hardware simulations live&amp;quot; simulation (where real people use simulated (or &amp;quot;dummy&amp;quot;) equipment in the real world); &amp;quot;virtual&amp;quot; simulation (where real people use simulated equipment in a simulated world, or virtual environment[3]), or &amp;quot;constructive&amp;quot; simulation (where simulated people use simulated equipment in a simulated environment). Constructive simulation is often referred to as &amp;quot;wargaming“) (Risk – has anyone played Risk?) Clinical Health Simulations (What we’ll experience next week when we visit Polyclinic) Entertainment Simulations – SimCity probably the most popular What were your thoughts on some of their feedback (or performance data considerations) considerations? Read How to By E-Learning Systems, Tools, and Services report: Simulation Development Tools (Brandon Hall, pgs 52 - 55) Performance Data Consideration: (Feedback recommendations) Composite Score Score for Each Task Completion Status Duration (Start Time / End Time) Date Last Accessed Record of Steps Performed Incorrectly All the simulation tools listed (software | soft skill) Reference work as game blog post - http://thezukunft.com/2010/02/24/business-idea-week-work-games/  
  • Notes: 10 minutes, 7:10-7:20PM
  • Notes: 20 minutes 7:20-7:40 (Slides 7-11) Like others there are a number of different names that you should be aware of. In some cases you’ll want to consider using an alternative term to “games” because of some of the reactions that people have. The danger is that everyone realize what is really being discusses when using different names/ways to describe solutions.
  • When we think about the different types of game and simulation genres there’s a lot to consider. This is a listing of some of the genres and how they might fall within a certain category or another . . . Or both, or be undefinable as a game or simulation. Is anyone not sure what any of these genres are?
  • The genres were just another way of thinking about all the possible variations in games and simulations and continuing to compare and contrast games and simulations. For me, there are six categories of games or simulations for learning Simple = crossword, word find, jeopardy Serious = some context to application Cause/Effect = usually spreadsheet/math oriented; based on stats, connections between variables Physical = mimicking psychomotor skills, usually device oriented Soft Skill = interpersonal skills, emotional intelligence, beliefs and mores, value-system related Software
  • What elements of the learning strategy do you think games and simulations can have the most impact on? Activity Immediate Feedback Connection to real-world application Motivation Analysis and Application skills What do you think about game and simulation impact on Psychomotor and Affective domains?
  • What are some organizational components that might impact the use of games and simulations? What are some outcomes of analysis that might impact your use of games and simulations? How could/do games and simulations impact some of these other learning technologies? How could/do some of these other technologies impact games and simulations?
  • Notes: 5 minutes 7:40-7:45 Serious Game | Immersive Learning Simulation Over 80% of Guild members have a problem with the term “Serious Game,” and 77% totally or somewhat agree with the statement “Games are great; it’s the name that’s a problem.” Over 93% of Guild members who have created an ILS report that their efforts produce results that are either somewhat or much better than other forms of rich-skill practice. Of the Guild members who have weighed in on this, more than 76% indicate they have received either a modest or a very good return on investment. Guild Members Believe that ILSs are More Expensive to Develop than they Really are: When we ask Guild members to indicate what they think an ILS will cost, and we compare it with what Guild members who have created an ILS tell us they cost, we see that the actual costs, on average, are quite a bit less than the anticipated cost. Median and Average Costs Per Learner: The median cost per learner for an ILS is $102.08, and the average cost is $281.51. Guild Members Plan to do a Lot More: 70% of Guild members plan to do more simulations and scenarios, 48% plan to do more mini-games, and 36% plan to do more serious games and/or Immersive Learning Simulations. Guild Members Still Thirst for Great Examples: Over 90% of Guild members want, or very much want, examples of great e-Learning games. (This is the concept behind LEEF is to showcase what others are doing in games and simulation – www.leef2010.net) How to measure success Resources for getting started Resources for getting help Ammunition to sell to organization Barriers to entry – I/we don’t know how to get started What industry do you think was most represented in the survey responses (Education – Higher Ed) – (Page 33)
  • Notes: 5 minutes 7:45-7:50 (slides 13-14) From eLearning Guild Report – tools that people are using to create games and simulations Adobe Captivate Adobe Flash Lectora Camtasia SmartBuilder Firefly Raptivity Toolbook - A lot of these are the same tools used for eLearning Authoring. Yes – you can create game with PPT Off the shelf: Games in a Flash Raptivity Forio Free: Adventure Maker Sploder Wild Pockets Scratch
  • Lots of tools, but the best tool depends on the game and simulation application.
  • Notes: 10 minutes 7:55-8:05 Next two steps in the process: Identify tools to evaluate (10 points)  Evaluate / weight tools based on criteria (40 points) Go over identifying tools (own knowledge, industry resources, suggestions from others, web search) Go over evaluating/weighting tools Decision Analysis: This is the process we’ll be going through for the learning technologies selection project Show the example decision analysis spreadsheet when going through this Criteria (what am I using to evaluate the product?) – Identify through use cases Identify possible choices (what are the potential options?) Classify (MUST or WANT) – this is key. Too many MUSTs and a solution will be difficult to find, too few MUSTs and it will be hard to narrow down a solution Weight (relative importance of each WANT) - 1 to 10 Evaluate products Doesn’t meet a MUST, then the product is eliminated from consideration Make a Selection Consider adverse consequences Consider threats
  • Notes: 5 minutes 8:05-8:10 (3) In class: Online Games (play at least one game and simulation) (3) In 1346: Games from the LTMS 603 class (2) In 1232: Wii Games Break into groups before the break
  • Note: 30 mins 8:10-8:40 PM 10 minutes at each station playing games
  • Note: 10 mins 8:40-8:50PM (slides 18-20) Strengths: Engaging Fun Applied They are more attune to how we think, experience and live Weaknesses: Selling them as a solution Different design and development methodologies needed Time to develop serious games Time to use and get involved Considerations: Different design and development methodologies needed Using off-the-shelf solutions Simple scenarios (text-based simulations) Educating the approver and the learner in some cases Flow: Using game design techniques in e-Learning
  • Game design implication for learning design Flow: Combination and balance of use of existing skills (ability) with acquiring new skills (challenge) that keeps the person engaged. Otherwise, if something is too challenging it’s frustrating. If it’s too easy, it’s boring. Goal: stay on the line or a little above or a little below. Cycles of Expertise: Learners practicing skills until they are nearly automatic, then having those skills fail that cause the learners to think again and learn new skills. (Pacing) Analogous to riding a bike. When you’re learning or experiencing something new you’re biking up hill. When you’re using something you know you’re biking down hill. An example of these strategies in a game would be: 1 st Level = pretty easy (Who Wants to Be a Millionaire?) 2 nd Level = knowledge + some new challenges 3 rd Level = knowledge, but need to apply it a little faster 4 th Level = knowledge + some new challenges Final Level = Cumulative application (really, really hard, but really fun and engaging)
  • Augmented Reality Games / Alternative Reality Games Easier to use development tools Instructional design models and skills will evolve – Games and simulation design driving this Devices (mobile, console, etc.)
  • Game and Simulation Olympics, Game 1 -Need to assign groups in the forums, but waiting for forums to get fixed Learning Technology Selection Report: Phase 2, Part 2 &amp; Part 3 Learning Technologies Encyclopedia: Games and Simulations
  • Next class: At Polyclinic – Medical Simulators I’ll send out address
  • LTMS 510: Learning Technologies and Solutions - Class 9

    1. 1. <ul><li>LTMS 510 Learning Technologies and Solutions Class 9, Tuesday, March 16, 2010 </li></ul><ul><li>Review </li></ul><ul><li>Student Presentation: Games </li></ul><ul><li>Topic 1: Games </li></ul><ul><li>Topic 2: Simulations </li></ul><ul><li>Topic 3: Decision Analysis </li></ul>
    2. 2. Review <ul><li>Virtual Classrooms </li></ul><ul><li>Virtual Labs </li></ul><ul><li>Podcasts </li></ul><ul><li>Use Cases & Criteria </li></ul>
    3. 3. Learning Technology Presentation
    4. 4. Reading / Viewing
    5. 5. BREAK
    6. 6. Games & Simulations Problem-Based Learning Activities Serious Games Immersive Learning Simulations Learning Games Mini-Games
    7. 7. Genres Games Hybrid Simulations <ul><li>Action </li></ul><ul><li>Fighting </li></ul><ul><li>Sports </li></ul><ul><li>3D shooter </li></ul><ul><li>Card or Board </li></ul><ul><li>Adventure </li></ul><ul><li>Driving or Flying </li></ul><ul><li>Strategy Game </li></ul><ul><li>Role Playing </li></ul><ul><li>Multiplayer </li></ul><ul><li>Augmented Reality </li></ul><ul><li>Branching Stories </li></ul><ul><li>Interactive Spreadsheets </li></ul><ul><li>Virtual Labs </li></ul><ul><li>Mini-games </li></ul>
    8. 8. Categories for Learning Simple Serious Software Physical Soft Skill Cause/Effect Game Simulation
    9. 10. Evaluation Assessment Learning Strategy Mgmt. Systems ----------------- Learning Technology Architecture ----------------- Learning Solutions Learning Outcomes Virtual Classroom Classroom Media Documentation Portfolio Community EPSS Simulation Game Online Course Mgmt. Systems Devices / Systems Organizational Strategy Performance Improvement Strategy Analysis
    10. 11. eLearning Guild Report <ul><li>The Name Game </li></ul><ul><li>Results </li></ul><ul><li>Costs </li></ul><ul><li>Mobile Learning </li></ul><ul><li>Future </li></ul><ul><li>Examples </li></ul>
    11. 12. Tools Adventure Maker PowerPoint Camtasia Firefly Lectora Toolbook SimWriter Raptivity Flash Captivate Sploder Torque 3D Scratch Wild Pockets Games in a Flash
    12. 13. Tools <ul><li>Simple Game Serious Game </li></ul><ul><li>Simulation (software, physical skills, soft skills, spreadsheet / cause and effect) </li></ul>
    13. 14. Decision Analysis <ul><li>Kepner-Tregoe Model </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Criteria </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Possible Choices </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Classify </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Weight </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Evaluate </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Select </li></ul></ul>
    14. 15. BREAK
    15. 16. Games and Simulations
    16. 17. Games & Simulations Strengths Weaknesses Considerations
    17. 18. Flow: The Psychology of Optimal Experience Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi Challenge Skill Flow Channel
    18. 19. Future
    19. 20. Assignments
    20. 21. LTMS 510: Learning Technologies and Solutions

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