Teaching the Common Core with Web-Based Technology
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Teaching the Common Core with Web-Based Technology

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Educators around the country are exploring innovative ways to teach the new Common Core standards. Innovative instructional strategies supported by technology integration will play a crucial role in ...

Educators around the country are exploring innovative ways to teach the new Common Core standards. Innovative instructional strategies supported by technology integration will play a crucial role in the successful implementation of the Common Core.

-Explore the Common Core standards and some of the web-based technologies that will support the Common Core curriculum
-Investigate instructional strategies and web 2.0 integration to impact teaching and classroom dynamics

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  • Andy <br /> Talk about our interest in Common Core standards in the LTMS program <br /> I’m not a common core expert. My background is in the use of educational technology and innovative instructional strategies. So, I’m coming at the common core from that perspective <br />
  • Educators around the country are exploring innovative ways to teach the new Common Core standards. Innovative instructional strategies supported by technology integration will play a crucial role in the successful implementation of the Common Core. <br /> -Explore the Common Core standards and some of the web-based technologies that will support the Common Core curriculum <br /> -Investigate instructional strategies and web 2.0 integration to impact teaching and classroom dynamics <br /> PA Core Standards <br /> Thursday, November 21: State Panel approved the Pennsylvania Core Standards. The standards require a final legal review from the state attorney general&apos;s office before they are implemented. <br /> PA Core Standards (https://www.pdesas.org/standard/PACore). All in draft format. <br /> Show the PA Core Standards cross walks - https://www.pdesas.org/standard/PACore. <br /> Common Core is a very big thing. Depending on the collaboration and discussion we have we may not be able to consider the entire common core curriculum – even at a high level <br />
  • This slide is for display to the audience to show them how they will vote on your polls in your presentation. You can remove this slide if you like or if the audience is already comfortable with texting and/or voting with Poll Everywhere. <br /> Sample Oral Instructions: <br /> Ladies and gentlemen, throughout today’s meeting we’re going to engage in some audience polling to find out what you’re thinking, what you’re up to and what you know. Now I’m going to ask for your opinion. We’re going to use your phones to do some audience voting just like on American Idol. <br /> So please take out your cell phones, but remember to leave them on silent. You can participate by sending a text message. <br /> This is a just standard rate text message, so it may be free for you, or up to twenty cents on some carriers if you do not have a text messaging plan. The service we are using is serious about privacy. I cannot see your phone numbers, and you’ll never receive follow-up text messages outside this presentation. There’s only one thing worse than email spam – and that’s text message spam because you have to pay to receive it! <br />
  • This slide is for display to the audience to show them how they will vote on your polls in your presentation. You can remove this slide if you like or if the audience is already comfortable with texting and/or voting with Poll Everywhere. <br /> Sample Oral Instructions: <br /> Ladies and gentlemen, throughout today’s meeting we’re going to engage in some audience polling to find out what you’re thinking, what you’re up to and what you know. Now I’m going to ask for your opinion. We’re going to use your phones or laptops to do some audience voting just like on American Idol. <br /> So please take out your mobilephones or laptops, but remember to leave them on silent. You can participate by submitting an answer at PollEv.com on your laptop or a mobile phone. <br /> The service we are using is serious about privacy. I cannot see who you are or who voted. <br />
  • Press F5 or use the tool bar to enter presentation mode in order to see the poll. <br /> http://www.polleverywhere.com/multiple_choice_polls/7k4UnFPRnndgRJh <br /> If you like, you can use this slide as a template for your own voting slides. You might use a slide like this if you feel your audience would benefit from the picture showing a text message on a phone. <br /> In an emergency during your presentation, if the poll isn&apos;t showing, navigate to this link in your web browser: <br />
  • Press F5 or use the tool bar to enter presentation mode in order to see the poll. <br /> http://www.polleverywhere.com/multiple_choice_polls/f0MUD26RImrGSHo <br /> If you like, you can use this slide as a template for your own voting slides. You might use a slide like this if you feel your audience would benefit from the picture showing a text message on a phone. <br /> In an emergency during your presentation, if the poll isn&apos;t showing, navigate to this link in your web browser: <br />
  • Common Core <br /> Grade-specific Math and English Language Arts Standards (more in development) <br /> Higher, clearer, deeper and based on what students must learn to succeed in college and modern careers <br /> Creating the same expectations for all students so families can understand exactly what every student should be learning. Also can increase cross-state academic collaboration. <br />
  • Standards <br /> Standards are in a staircase structure that builds upon each grade level <br /> Applied across the spectrum of grades (more detailed standards at the grade level). <br /> English Language Arts standards apply to History, Social Studies, Science and Technical topics <br /> For example: <br /> Grade 6: Key Ideas and Details <br /> Cite textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. <br /> Determine a theme or central idea of a text and how it is conveyed through particular details; provide a summary of the text distinct from personal opinions or judgments. <br /> Describe how a particular story’s or drama’s plot unfolds in a series of episodes as well as how the characters respond or change as the plot moves toward a resolution. <br /> What jumps out at you from this list of elements that make up the foundation of the standards for math and english? <br /> Math = explain and analyze mathematical reasoning <br /> English = distribution and collaboration; research <br /> http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/answer-sheet/wp/2013/10/31/six-ways-common-core-is-changing-englishmath-classes/ <br />
  • You are probably familiar with this diagram that indicates web 2.0 tools that can support learning at each of the levels of Bloom’s Taxonomy. <br /> As you look at integrating the common core standards, many of these same tools (especially those that can support higher order thinking) can also be valuable assets. <br /> That’s what we’re going to explore today; some of these web-based technologies and how they can support integrating the common core into your curriculum. <br />
  • The Reading standards place equal emphasis on the sophistication of what students read and the skill with which they read. Standard 10 defines a grade-by-grade “staircase” of increasing text complexity that rises from beginning reading to the college and career readiness level. Whatever they are reading, students must also show a steadily growing ability to discern more from and make fuller use of text, including making an increasing number of connections among ideas and between texts, considering a wider range of textual evidence, and becoming more sensitive to inconsistencies, ambiguities, and poor reasoning in texts. <br /> Any other tools that you can recommend or ways in which you might address this key feature of the English Language Arts standards? <br /> Any of these tools that you’re not familiar with that you want to explore? <br /> Google timeline <br /> http://code.google.com/p/simile-widgets/wiki/Timeline <br />
  • The Standards acknowledge the fact that whereas some writing skills, such as the ability to plan, revise, edit, and publish, are applicable to many types of writing, other skills are more properly defined in terms of specific writing types: arguments, informative/explanatory texts, and narratives. Standard 9 stresses the importance of the writing-reading connection by requiring students to draw upon and write about evidence from literary and informational texts. Because of the centrality of writing to most forms of inquiry, research standards are prominently included in this strand, though skills important to research are infused throughout the document. <br /> Any other tools that you can recommend or ways in which you might address this key feature of the English Language Arts standards? <br /> Bubblr - http://www.pimpampum.net/bubblr/index.phpBubblr is a tool to create comic strips using photos from flickr.com Begin searching images and add bubble to them. <br /> Google Advanced Search <br /> 10 ways to help students search smarter (http://catlintucker.com/2012/04/google-search-10-questions-10-answers-to-help-you-search-smarter/ <br />
  • Including but not limited to skills necessary for formal presentations, the Speaking and Listening standards require students to develop a range of broadly useful oral communication and interpersonal skills. Students must learn to work together, express and listen carefully to ideas, integrate information from oral, visual, quantitative, and media sources, evaluate what they hear, use media and visual displays strategically to help achieve communicative purposes, and adapt speech to context and task. <br /> Any other tools that you can recommend or ways in which you might address this key feature of the English Language Arts standards? <br /> YouTube.com/Teachers <br /> Educanon <br />
  • The Language standards include the essential “rules” of standard written and spoken English, but they also approach language as a matter of craft and informed choice among alternatives. The vocabulary standards focus on understanding words and phrases, their relationships, and their nuances and on acquiring new vocabulary, particularly general academic and domain-specific words and phrases. <br /> Games – had a grad student who created a game in PowerPoint (Super Stu and the Grammar Gremlins) <br />
  • We are just going to review a few of the Math standards; ones that have the most opportunities for support through technology integration <br /> Mathematically proficient students understand and use stated assumptions, definitions, and previously established results in constructing arguments. They make conjectures and build a logical progression of statements to explore the truth of their conjectures. They are able to analyze situations by breaking them into cases, and can recognize and use counterexamples. They justify their conclusions, communicate them to others, and respond to the arguments of others. They reason inductively about data, making plausible arguments that take into account the context from which the data arose. Mathematically proficient students are also able to compare the effectiveness of two plausible arguments, distinguish correct logic or reasoning from that which is flawed, and—if there is a flaw in an argument—explain what it is. Elementary students can construct arguments using concrete referents such as objects, drawings, diagrams, and actions. Such arguments can make sense and be correct, even though they are not generalized or made formal until later grades. Later, students learn to determine domains to which an argument applies. Students at all grades can listen or read the arguments of others, decide whether they make sense, and ask useful questions to clarify or improve the arguments. <br /> Any other tools that you can recommend or ways in which you might address this standard for mathematical practice? <br />
  • Mathematically proficient students can apply the mathematics they know to solve problems arising in everyday life, society, and the workplace. In early grades, this might be as simple as writing an addition equation to describe a situation. In middle grades, a student might apply proportional reasoning to plan a school event or analyze a problem in the community. By high school, a student might use geometry to solve a design problem or use a function to describe how one quantity of interest depends on another. Mathematically proficient students who can apply what they know are comfortable making assumptions and approximations to simplify a complicated situation, realizing that these may need revision later. They are able to identify important quantities in a practical situation and map their relationships using such tools as diagrams, two-way tables, graphs, flowcharts and formulas. They can analyze those relationships mathematically to draw conclusions. They routinely interpret their mathematical results in the context of the situation and reflect on whether the results make sense, possibly improving the model if it has not served its purpose. <br /> Any other tools that you can recommend or ways in which you might address this standard for mathematical practice? <br />
  • Mathematically proficient students consider the available tools when solving a mathematical problem. These tools might include pencil and paper, concrete models, a ruler, a protractor, a calculator, a spreadsheet, a computer algebra system, a statistical package, or dynamic geometry software. Proficient students are sufficiently familiar with tools appropriate for their grade or course to make sound decisions about when each of these tools might be helpful, recognizing both the insight to be gained and their limitations. For example, mathematically proficient high school students analyze graphs of functions and solutions generated using a graphing calculator. They detect possible errors by strategically using estimation and other mathematical knowledge. When making mathematical models, they know that technology can enable them to visualize the results of varying assumptions, explore consequences, and compare predictions with data. Mathematically proficient students at various grade levels are able to identify relevant external mathematical resources, such as digital content located on a website, and use them to pose or solve problems. They are able to use technological tools to explore and deepen their understanding of concepts. <br /> Any other tools that you can recommend or ways in which you might address this standard for mathematical practice? <br /> Blender (http://www.blender.org/) <br />
  • http://www.corestandards.org/Math/Content/SP <br /> Develop understanding of statistical variability. <br /> Summarize and describe distributions <br /> Use random sampling to draw inferences about a population. <br /> Draw informal comparative inferences about two populations. <br /> Investigate chance processes and develop, use, and evaluate probability models <br /> Investigate patterns of association in bivariate data (data that has two variables). <br /> Any other tools that you can recommend or ways in which you might address this standard for mathematical practice? <br /> ARC GIS (http://www.esri.com/software/arcgis/explorer/) <br /> ArcGIS Explorer Desktop is a free GIS viewer that gives you an easy way to explore, visualize, and share GIS information. <br />
  • Case study 1: http://community.simplek12.com/scripts/student/webinars/view.asp?id=340#overview <br /> Ask students to do a research paper <br /> Diigo – Digital Annotations <br /> Students struggle with create works cited pages, manage quotations and resources <br /> Teach students to do good research <br /> Manage information and evaluation, discuss and analyze that information <br /> Diigo screen capture <br />
  • Case study 2: http://community.simplek12.com/scripts/student/webinars/view.asp?id=341 <br /> Math standards, persevere, make sense of problem, reason abstractly and quantitatively <br /> Incorporates writing about process and understanding as part of developing mathematical skills <br /> Dy/Dan <br /> http://blog.mrmeyer.com/?p=10285 <br /> Common Core – apply math to real-world scenarios <br /> YummyMath.com <br /> Browse by math topic (Algebra, etc.) <br /> Presents scenarios and then provides solution <br /> Text chat: What technology would you recommend for students collaborating in groups to solve the problems <br /> Debate a Bargain <br /> Apply understanding of ration/proportions to figure out what’s the better deal. <br /> Google Docs, research, etc. flowcharting to diagram the evaluation process <br />
  • New layout <br /> Go out to the Standards <br /> http://www.corestandards.org <br /> Then, go out to standards and pick one, then we’ll brainstorm instructional strategy and technology <br />
  • Press F5 or use the tool bar to enter presentation mode in order to see the poll. <br /> http://www.polleverywhere.com/multiple_choice_polls/6UCYOwOa0WLw2eb <br /> If you like, you can use this slide as a template for your own voting slides. You might use a slide like this if you feel your audience would benefit from the picture showing a text message on a phone. <br /> In an emergency during your presentation, if the poll isn&apos;t showing, navigate to this link in your web browser: <br />
  • Intro survey <br /> Review the question results from the poll <br /> Poll question for this audience <br />
  • Review the question results from the poll <br /> Poll question for this audience <br />
  • Review the question results from the poll <br /> Poll question for this audience <br /> http://www.corestandards.org/in-the-states <br />
  • Review the question results from the poll <br /> Text chat: Are there any of these results that you feel differently about for any of the groups <br />
  • Review the question results from the poll <br /> Text chat: Are there any of these results that you feel differently about for your school, district or state <br />
  • I want to share some resources and talk about other learning opportunities, but first I’d like to take some time to answer any additional questions you have. <br /> While you share in the text chat I’ll move to the next screen to share some resources. <br />
  • I will display these resources again when we do the session evaluation. <br />
  • Andy <br /> Talk about our interest in Common Core standards in the LTMS program <br /> I’m not a common core expert. My background is in the use of educational technology and innovative instructional strategies. So, I’m coming at the common core from that perspective <br />

Teaching the Common Core with Web-Based Technology Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Teaching the Common Core with Web-Based Technology Andy Petroski Director & Assistant Professor of Learning Technologies Harrisburg University of Science & Technology
  • 2. LTMS Andy Petroski Director of Learning Technologies Assistant Professor of Learning Technologies Harrisburg University apetroski@harrisburgu.edu @apetroski Harrisburg University CAELT
  • 3. teaching the common core with web-based technology Common Core Web Technologies Instructional Strategies
  • 4. How To Vote via Texting 1. Standard texting rates only (worst case US $0.20) TIPS 2. We have no access to your phone number 3. Capitalization doesn’t matter, but spaces and spelling do
  • 5. How To Vote via PollEv.com TIP Capitalization doesn’t matter, but spaces and spelling do
  • 6. common core Higher Expectations Grade Specific Math & Language Arts Common Curriculum College & Career Readiness
  • 7. common core Standards for Mathematical Practice English Language Arts Anchor Standards Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them Key Ideas and Details Reason abstractly and quantitatively Craft and Structure Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others Integration of Knowledge and Ideas Model with mathematics Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity Use appropriate tools strategically Text Types and Purposes Attend to precision Production and Distribution of Writing Look for and make use of structure Research to Build and Present Knowledge Look for and express regularity in repeated reasoning Range of Writing Comprehension and Collaboration Presentation of Knowledge and Ideas Conventions of Standard English Knowledge of Language Vocabulary Acquisition and Use source: www.corestandards.org
  • 8. web-based technology and learning outcomes source: http://www.usi.edu/distance/bloom%20pyramid.jpg
  • 9. key features of the standards English Language Arts Mindmeister Reading: Text complexity and the growth of comprehension Gliffy Google Apps (Doc, Form, Timeline, Presentation) Prezi Diigo VoiceThread
  • 10. key features of the standards English Language Arts Writing: Text types, responding to reading, and research Google Advanced Search Diigo Moodle (Discussion Forum, Glossary, Wiki) Google Apps (Doc, Form) Bubblr
  • 11. key features of the standards English Language Arts Skype VoiceThread Speaking and Listening: Flexible communication and collaboration Jing Google Apps (Presentation, Form) Google+ Hangouts YouTube / TeacherTube Open Educational Resources (i.e. Khan Academy)
  • 12. key features of the standards English Language Arts Language: Conventions, effective use, and vocabulary Microsoft Word Podcasts (e.g. Grammar Girl) Animoto / Digital Storytelling Flashcard Machine / Study Blue Games
  • 13. standards for mathematical practice Mathematics Creately / Gliffy Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others Google Apps (Doc, Form, Timeline, Presentation, Drawing) Schoology Moodle (Discussion Forum, Glossary, Wiki) Poll Everywhere / Socrative VoiceThread
  • 14. standards for mathematical practice Mathematics Google Drawing Model with mathematics Gliffy Smart Draw / Floor Plan Games 3D Modeling / Printing
  • 15. standards for mathematical practice Mathematics Google Advanced Search Use appropriate tools strategically Wolfram Alpha Google Apps (Form, Spreadsheet) SurveyMonkey Excel Blender (3D Modeling)
  • 16. standards for mathematical practice Mathematics Google Maps Wolfram Alpha Statistics and Probability ARC GIS Explorer Google Apps (Form, Spreadsheet) Excel Infographics
  • 17. common core scenario English Language Arts • Research paper • English Language Arts Standards » History/Social Studies » Grade 6-8 • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RH.6-8.1 Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary sources. Resources: http://bit.ly/104UtJM • www.diigo.com • Digital annotation and analysis • Manage information and evaluation, discuss and analyze that information
  • 18. common core scenario Mathematics • Apply math to real-world scenarios • Mathematics » Grade 7 » Ratios & Proportional Relationships • CCSS.Math.Content.7.RP.A.2 Recognize and represent proportional relationships between quantities. Resources: http://bit.ly/OSVCvG • YummyMath.com • Browse by topic • Collaborate in groups, then discuss the solution as a class • Debate a Bargain • Apply understanding of ration/proportions to figure out which product is the better deal. • Google Docs / Spreadsheet • Creately / Gliffy to diagram thought process
  • 19. explore and brainstorm http://www.corestandards.org https://www.pdesas.org/standard/PACore
  • 20. are you ready? In an online survey on edweek.org, conducted by the EPE Research Center, teachers were asked for their views on how ready they and their schools are for the common core. source: EPE Research Center, 2012; http://visual.ly/getting-ready-common-core
  • 21. are you ready? source: EPE Research Center, 2012; http://visual.ly/getting-ready-common-core
  • 22. are you ready? source: EPE Research Center, 2012; http://visual.ly/getting-ready-common-core
  • 23. are you ready? source: EPE Research Center, 2012; http://visual.ly/getting-ready-common-core
  • 24. are you ready? source: EPE Research Center, 2012; http://visual.ly/getting-ready-common-core
  • 25. questions & feedback
  • 26. resources • • • • • • • 10 Tech Tools to Teach the Common Core Standards Catlin Tucker Blog Common Core and Tech Wiki Common Core Technology Integration Live Binder Common Core Toolkit Common Core Resources for Educators Common Core Standards Cheat Sheet
  • 27. LTMS •Andy Petroski •Director of Learning Technologies •Assistant Professor of Learning Technologies •Harrisburg University •apetroski@harrisburgu.edu •@apetroski Harrisburg University CAELT