Slavery The Union in Peril Missouri Compromise, 8.2, Chapter 10
The Missouri Compromise <ul><li>As Americans pushed west during Manifest Destiny, Missouri applied to Congress to become a...
<ul><li>U.S. in 1820 </li></ul>
<ul><li>When Alabama was admitted as a slave state in 1819, Missouri’s fate became more important </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><l...
<ul><li>Congress agrees on the  Missouri Compromise , 1821 </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Maine admitted as free state </li></u...
Slavery and Abolition <ul><li>In the 1820s, antislavery societies wanted to resettle slaves in Africa </li></ul><ul><ul><u...
<ul><li>William Lloyd Garrison </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Religious reformer </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Had his ow...
<ul><li>David Walker </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Free black </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Wanted blacks to fight for f...
<ul><li>Frederick Douglass </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Born into slavery </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Lucky in th...
<ul><li>Frederick Douglass </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Began own newspaper named “The North Star” </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><u...
Life Under Slavery <ul><li>Slavery changed by the 1830s </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Page 250 </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul...
<ul><li>Urban slavery </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Work in mills or on ships </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Did not alwa...
Rebellion <ul><li>Nat Turner’s Rebellion </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Nat Turner was a slave in Virginia </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><...
 
Defending Slavery <ul><li>Virginia’s legislature made a motion to abolish slavery </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Lost because t...
<ul><li>Using the Bible to defend slavery </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Servants should obey their masters </li></ul></ul></ul...
Chapter 10 The Divisive Politics of Slavery
A Nation Divided <ul><li>By 1850, the country has experienced: </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Economic growth </li></ul></ul></...
<ul><li>North : </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Saw South as an economic backwater, immoral slave power </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>S...
<ul><li>Aided by efforts of abolitionists like Frederick Douglass, public opinion in the North drifts toward ending slaver...
A Nation Divided <ul><li>Wilmot Proviso : </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Stated that slavery would be forbidden in all territories ...
 
 
Compromise of 1850 <ul><li>California takes center stage in the slavery issue </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Admit as a slave o...
Compromise of 1850 <ul><li>The Compromise: </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>For the North   CA admitted as free </li></ul></ul><...
Compromise of 1850 <ul><li>The South’s end of the deal </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Fugitive Slave Act : </li></ul></ul></ul>...
Protest and Resistance <ul><li>Harriet Beecher Stowe </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Uncle Tom’s Cabin </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><...
Protest and Resistance <ul><li>Underground Railroad </li></ul><ul><ul><li>A secret network of people who would hide fugiti...
<ul><li>Underground Railroad </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Conductors:  guided runaways from one safe hiding place to another ...
 
Kansas and Nebraska <ul><li>Question of how to organize the Kansas and Nebraska territories </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Sena...
Bleeding Kansas <ul><li>Violent fights erupted between slaveholders and abolitionists </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Fighting f...
New Political Parties <ul><li>To accommodate the various issues in America: </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Free-Soil Party </li...
Election of 1860 Secession
Secession <ul><li>December 1860, South Carolina is first to secede with a unanimous decision </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Oth...
<ul><li>Jefferson Davis becomes the president of the new Confederate States of America </li></ul>Secession
The Coming War <ul><li>The issues of slavery worked to sever all ties between the North and South for 40 years </li></ul><...
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Slavery (Ch. 10)

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Slavery (Ch. 10)

  1. 1. Slavery The Union in Peril Missouri Compromise, 8.2, Chapter 10
  2. 2. The Missouri Compromise <ul><li>As Americans pushed west during Manifest Destiny, Missouri applied to Congress to become a state in 1819 </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Until 1818: ten free states, ten slave states </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>In 1818, Illinois admitted as a free state </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>MO expected to become new slave state to continue balance </li></ul></ul></ul>
  3. 3. <ul><li>U.S. in 1820 </li></ul>
  4. 4. <ul><li>When Alabama was admitted as a slave state in 1819, Missouri’s fate became more important </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>South: “The North is trying to end slavery!” </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>North: “The South is trying to spread slavery!” </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Thomas Jefferson: “We have the wolf by his ears and we can neither hold him, nor safely let him go.” </li></ul></ul>The Missouri Compromise
  5. 5. <ul><li>Congress agrees on the Missouri Compromise , 1821 </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Maine admitted as free state </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Missouri admitted as slave state </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Preserves sectional balance </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Louisiana Territory split in half at 36 degrees north latitude </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Page 223 </li></ul></ul></ul></ul>The Missouri Compromise
  6. 6. Slavery and Abolition <ul><li>In the 1820s, antislavery societies wanted to resettle slaves in Africa </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Based on the belief that African Americans were an inferior race that couldn’t coexist with white society </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Most blacks, however, were now native to America </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>“We are natives of this country. We only ask that we be treated as well as foreigners.” </li></ul></ul></ul></ul>
  7. 7. <ul><li>William Lloyd Garrison </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Religious reformer </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Had his own newspaper, “The Liberator” </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Called for immediate emancipation </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Freeing of slaves with no payment to slaveholders </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Founded American Anti-Slavery Society (1833) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Friends with David Walker… </li></ul></ul></ul>Voices of Abolition
  8. 8. <ul><li>David Walker </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Free black </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Wanted blacks to fight for freedom rather than wait for slavery to end </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Seen as too radical for many </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Condemned the fact that free blacks in the North could only find the lowest paying jobs </li></ul></ul></ul>Voices of Abolition
  9. 9. <ul><li>Frederick Douglass </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Born into slavery </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Lucky in that his owner’s wife taught him to read and write </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Felt that reading/writing was his way to gain freedom </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Escaped in 1838 to New York </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Read “The Liberator” </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Garrison made Douglass a lecturer for the American Anti-Slavery Society </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Wanted to end slavery through political means </li></ul></ul></ul></ul>Voices of Abolition
  10. 10. <ul><li>Frederick Douglass </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Began own newspaper named “The North Star” </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>The star that guided runaway slaves to freedom </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>In early 1840s, protested segregated trains by sitting in a car reserved for whites </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>When he refused to leave, a group of white men pulled the railroad seat out of the floor of the car, with Douglass still hanging onto it </li></ul></ul></ul></ul>Voices of Abolition
  11. 11. Life Under Slavery <ul><li>Slavery changed by the 1830s </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Page 250 </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Most lived on large plantations </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Men, women, children worked in fields while the overseer’s whip forced them to keep working </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Some worked on small farms </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Labored alongside owners </li></ul></ul></ul></ul>
  12. 12. <ul><li>Urban slavery </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Work in mills or on ships </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Did not always work for their owners </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>More like freedom </li></ul></ul></ul></ul>Life Under Slavery
  13. 13. Rebellion <ul><li>Nat Turner’s Rebellion </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Nat Turner was a slave in Virginia </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Believed that he was supposed to lead his people to freedom </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>In 1831, with 80 followers, he attacked and killed 60 whites </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Captured and hanged by state and federal troops </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>In response, many innocent blacks were killed </li></ul></ul></ul>
  14. 15. Defending Slavery <ul><li>Virginia’s legislature made a motion to abolish slavery </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Lost because the legislature was balanced in favor of eastern slaveholders </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>No more question in Virginia on slavery in the antebellum South </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Pre-Civil War </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Tightened controls on slaves </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Keep them from preaching, reading/writing, voting, owning guns, buying alcohol, freedom of assembly </li></ul></ul></ul>
  15. 16. <ul><li>Using the Bible to defend slavery </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Servants should obey their masters </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Slavery benefits blacks </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Makes them part of a prosperous and Christian civilization </li></ul></ul></ul>Defending Slavery
  16. 17. Chapter 10 The Divisive Politics of Slavery
  17. 18. A Nation Divided <ul><li>By 1850, the country has experienced: </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Economic growth </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Population growth </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Expanded borders </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Major increase in wealth </li></ul></ul></ul>
  18. 19. <ul><li>North : </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Saw South as an economic backwater, immoral slave power </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Saw itself as free labor system that ensured democratic rights of everyone </li></ul></ul><ul><li>South : </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Saw itself as the great engine of economic growth (cotton) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Slavery was a benefit to an inferior race </li></ul></ul>A Nation Divided
  19. 20. <ul><li>Aided by efforts of abolitionists like Frederick Douglass, public opinion in the North drifts toward ending slavery </li></ul>A Nation Divided
  20. 21. A Nation Divided <ul><li>Wilmot Proviso : </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Stated that slavery would be forbidden in all territories acquired through war with Mexico </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>South opposed– “slaves are property” </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>House of Reps approved, but Senate rejected </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Page 306 </li></ul></ul></ul></ul>
  21. 24. Compromise of 1850 <ul><li>California takes center stage in the slavery issue </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Admit as a slave or free state? </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Major debate in the Senate </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Calhoun for South, Webster for North </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Calhoun threatens secession </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Webster’s secession speech (p.308) </li></ul></ul></ul></ul>
  22. 25. Compromise of 1850 <ul><li>The Compromise: </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>For the North  CA admitted as free </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Popular sovereignty : new territories will be given the right to vote to be slave or free </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>For the South  harsher fugitive slave laws </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>IL Senator Stephen Douglas got the bill passed by pushing the idea of popular sovereignty </li></ul></ul></ul>
  23. 26. Compromise of 1850 <ul><li>The South’s end of the deal </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Fugitive Slave Act : </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Fugitives not allowed a trial by jury </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Slaveholder’s written statement with description of fugitive was all that was needed to send him back </li></ul></ul></ul></ul>
  24. 27. Protest and Resistance <ul><li>Harriet Beecher Stowe </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Uncle Tom’s Cabin </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Her characters put a human face on slavery </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>People can empathize with slaves </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>“So this is the little lady who made the big war.” </li></ul></ul></ul>
  25. 28. Protest and Resistance <ul><li>Underground Railroad </li></ul><ul><ul><li>A secret network of people who would hide fugitive slaves as they escaped to the North or Canada </li></ul></ul>
  26. 29. <ul><li>Underground Railroad </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Conductors: guided runaways from one safe hiding place to another </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Harriet Tubman </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Some compared her to “Moses” </li></ul></ul></ul>Protest and Resistance
  27. 31. Kansas and Nebraska <ul><li>Question of how to organize the Kansas and Nebraska territories </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Senator Stephen Douglas wanted to use popular sovereignty to determine the status of these new territories </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Kansas-Nebraska Act (1854): </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Popular sovereignty: let the people of these territories decide </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Majority wins… Ready, set, go! </li></ul></ul></ul></ul>
  28. 32. Bleeding Kansas <ul><li>Violent fights erupted between slaveholders and abolitionists </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Fighting for control of Kansas </li></ul></ul></ul>
  29. 33. New Political Parties <ul><li>To accommodate the various issues in America: </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Free-Soil Party </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Know-Nothing Party </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>AKA “American Party” </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>AKA “Nativist Party” </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Republican Party </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Democratic Party </li></ul></ul></ul>
  30. 34. Election of 1860 Secession
  31. 35. Secession <ul><li>December 1860, South Carolina is first to secede with a unanimous decision </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Other states soon followed </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Believed the South had no choice but to secede and North had no choice but to accept </li></ul></ul></ul></ul>
  32. 36. <ul><li>Jefferson Davis becomes the president of the new Confederate States of America </li></ul>Secession
  33. 37. The Coming War <ul><li>The issues of slavery worked to sever all ties between the North and South for 40 years </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Political compromise was no longer possible </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Both sides were unprepared for the coming war </li></ul></ul></ul>
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