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Gaga for Dada
Gaga for Dada
Gaga for Dada
Gaga for Dada
Gaga for Dada
Gaga for Dada
Gaga for Dada
Gaga for Dada
Gaga for Dada
Gaga for Dada
Gaga for Dada
Gaga for Dada
Gaga for Dada
Gaga for Dada
Gaga for Dada
Gaga for Dada
Gaga for Dada
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Gaga for Dada

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History and social milieu of the Dada art movement. Group effort made for design class at CCSF.

History and social milieu of the Dada art movement. Group effort made for design class at CCSF.

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  • 1. Gaga for Dada Definition and History of DaDa Art Movement by Tony Huynh Angela Penny Peter Park It's too idiotic to be schizophrenic. -Carl Jung on Dada
  • 2. Dadaism Largely because of advances in weapon technology, World War I was an extremely violent, traumatizing conflict that played out on European soil. Artists, writers, draft dodgers, musicians and activists from both sides of the conflict between Allies and the Central Powers fled to neutral Zurich, Switzerland. Some art historians say that the official start of the movement was when Hugo Ball opened the nightclub "Cabaret Voltaire," in the Spring of 1916.
  • 3. the dada manifesto The German, Hugo Ball had volunteered for the army but was rejected for medical reasons. After a particularly bloody battle he was disillusioned and wrote, "The war is founded on a glaring mistake, men have been confused with machines". Considered a traitor in his country he moved to Zurich. On July 14, 1916 he read his work, "The Dada Manifesto," at the "First Dada Soiree." Here is an excerpt: Dada is a new tendency in art...Dada comes from the dictionary. It is terribly simple. In French it means "hobby horse". In German it means "good- bye", "Get off my back"....
  • 4. Dada manifesto 2.0 In 1918 , the Romanian Jew, Tristan Tzara wrote a second Dada Manifesto which appeared in this Bulletin. One of the most important contributions Dada made to Graphic Design is the way it meshed words with text. Whether you're talking about imagery in a pamphlet or text on a piece of art (or non-art). Here is an excerpt: The magic of a word - DADA - which for journalists has opened the door to an unforeseen world, has for us not the slightest importance. To launch a manifesto you have to want: A.B. & C., and fulminate against 1, 2, & 3, work yourself up and sharpen your wings to conquer and circulate lower and upper case As, Bs & Cs, sign, shout, swear, organise prose into a form that is absolutely and irrefutably obvious, prove its ne plus ultra and maintain that novelty resembles life in the same way as the latest apparition of a harlot proves the essence of God.
  • 5. Some Founding Members Dada had only one rule: Never follow any known rules. Francis Picabia Tristan Tzara Hugo Ball Emmy Hennings Richard Huelsenbeck Sophie Täuber Hans Richter Jean Arp Marcel Janco
  • 6. Hans Richter In the same year he was wounded and discharged from the army and went to Zürich and joined the Dada movement. Richter believed that the artist's duty was to be actively political, opposing war and supporting the revolution.
  • 7. Jean / Hans Arp Jean Arp was German-French and when he spoke in French he called himself Jean and when he spoke in German he called himself Hans. He was in Zurich in 1916 and in 1920 started a Dada group in Cologne, Germany with Max Ernst. In 1925 his work appeared in the first Surrealist show in Paris. He experimented with the "Laws of Chance" Basically he just randomly arranged shapes on a piece of paper. This piece is called "Collage with Squares Arranged According to the Laws of Chance," done in 1916-17. It is made of torn-and- pasted paper on blue-gray paper.
  • 8. Francis Picabia Picabia had a French mother who died when he was young and a Spanish father. He was in Barcelona in 1916 and started his own well-known Dada periodical 391. Which was modeled after 291 in the US. Picabia viewed technology as a key metaphor of modern society. “The machine”, Picabia observed in 1915, “has become more than a mere adjunct of life. It is really part of human life, perhaps the very soul.”
  • 9. MARCEL DUCHAMP Duchamp challenged conventional thought about artistic processes and art marketing, not so much by writing, but through subversive actions such as dubbing a urinal art and naming it Fountain. He produced relatively few artworks, while moving quickly through the avant-garde circles of his time. Duchamp like the other Dadaists responded to industrial technology of the time with a rebellious playfulness. I don't believe in art. I believe in artists.
  • 10. Fountain is a 1917 work by Marcel Duchamp. Duchamp used a urinal, which he titled Fountain and signed "R. Mutt". It is one of the pieces which he called readymades. In such pieces he made use of an already existing object. The art show to which Duchamp submitted the piece stated that all works would be accepted, but Fountain was not actually displayed, The New York Dadaists stirred controversy about Fountain "He took an article of life, placed it so that its useful significance disappeared under the new title and point of view – created a new thought for that object."
  • 11. L.L.O.O.Q Marcele Duchamp's infamous artwork that made him align with the Dadaists. Phonetically L.H.O.O. Q. can be read in French "she has a hot ass." L.H.O.O.Q
  • 12. MAN RAY Man Ray was a significant contributor to both the Dada and Surrealist movements, although his ties to each were informal. His first proto-Dada object, an assemblage titled Self-Portrait, was exhibited the following year. He produced his first significant photographs in 1918. "There is no progress in art, any more than there is progress in making love. There are simply different ways of doing it."
  • 13. Man Ray-The Rope Dancer
  • 14. DADA 1 Cover of the first edition of the publication, Dada. Edited by Tristan Tzara. Zürich, 1917.
  • 15. D A D A I S M 2DAY
  • 16. The Keepsake I made this newsprint currency to defeat the purpose of wealth. Wealth is meaningless along with peoples' concern of their status quo attached. The distribution of wealth is a joke therefore the faces on bills might as well be revered from comic book villans. What is the status quo? In our modern world it is the newest and expensive things we buy that define ourselves. Does money make you more meaningful? I don't believe so. The wealthy get wealthier and they could careless about war as long as it doesn't stand in their way to get more money. I chose found materials and sources such as newspaper, comics, clippings and images from the internet. I wanted to talk about wealth by producing a trillion dollar bill on collaged newsprint as an ironic twist to our perception of the wealthy class. I also wanted to play with the idea that if there was 20 something bills that are each a trillion dollar it will marginalize the whole idea of wealth. The wealthy class and the system of wealth is all about gluttony and greed and not about the real issues such as war. War and wealth share a special relationship because they are about greed and lots of wealth have funded wars. We use presidents for the face our bills and I chose to use a comic book villian as a satirical way of representing evil, violence, and ridicule.
  • 17. Stop

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