Brazilian Portuguese, European Portuguese, and some ga(s)ps in the middle…

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Opening lecture at 30th EMWA Conference in Lisbon

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Brazilian Portuguese, European Portuguese, and some ga(s)ps in the middle…

  1. 1. Brazilian Portuguese, European Portuguese, and some ga(s)ps in the middle… Andrea Palluch
  2. 2. Languages Portuguese: Indo-European Grouped in families (similarities) Great and profound differences How did they originate?
  3. 3. Migration Waves  ~60 different languages  Spoken in Iran, India, parts of Europe and Americas  Greek, English, Russian, French, Hindi: all ‘siblings’ Indo-European languages
  4. 4. 4000 - 3500 BC Latin
  5. 5. Latins and Rome  Rome is built between 700-500BC  An ancient form of Latin is spoken  Expansion from 500BC  ‘Italy’ dominated by 270BC  Standard written language: classical texts (Plato, Cicero)
  6. 6. Formal: • Politics • Arts • Science • Written docs ‘Popular’: • Army • Trade • Latin lggs Originated in popular speech
  7. 7. V Century Germanic invasions: adopted words
  8. 8. VII Century Arabic domination and great influence over ~800 years: • sophisticated culture • great literary production
  9. 9. Portugal • Independent by 1143 • Strong movement to expel Arabs (gone by XIII century) • Alfama (Al-Hama) in Lisbon • Trade, culture and knowledge • Dom Henrique and the development of navigation techniques: Portuguese, Italian, Arab and Jewish scholars • Leadership in ‘discovering’ the rest of the world
  10. 10. Navigation = Exchange
  11. 11. Brazil - 1500AD African: Niger-Congo More than 4 million, from different regions/cultures Amerindian: Tupi ~1200 native indian populations ~1000 languages
  12. 12. Atlas Miller de Lopo Homem, 1515-1519 • First contact with Tupi • Barter • 1530: colonisation • Native indian lgg • ‘Paulista General Lgg’ (up to XVIII century) • ‘Amazonian General Lgg’ (from XVII; 8 million)
  13. 13. African Slaves  Sugar: lucrative business bought to Brazil (XVI century)  Native indians: lost cause  Banto speaking people  Gold and diamond mining (XVII century)  ‘Specialist’ slave: éve-fon speaking people
  14. 14. Oficial Language: Portuguese  Brazil as a source of wealth  Radical measures to ‘control’ lucrative business  1808: Royal family and court move to Rio de Janeiro  Formal and written Portuguese take off  New slave trade: Iorubá-speaking people
  15. 15. XIX and XX centuries: first steps towards Brazilian Portuguese  Slavery ends  Immigration waves  Industrialisation  Migration: rural to urban  Modernism: arts and literature especially  Communications: radio, TV and internet  Formal x informal Brazilian Portuguese  Foreign words and expressions

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