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Boys graphic novels and book clubs
Boys graphic novels and book clubs
Boys graphic novels and book clubs
Boys graphic novels and book clubs
Boys graphic novels and book clubs
Boys graphic novels and book clubs
Boys graphic novels and book clubs
Boys graphic novels and book clubs
Boys graphic novels and book clubs
Boys graphic novels and book clubs
Boys graphic novels and book clubs
Boys graphic novels and book clubs
Boys graphic novels and book clubs
Boys graphic novels and book clubs
Boys graphic novels and book clubs
Boys graphic novels and book clubs
Boys graphic novels and book clubs
Boys graphic novels and book clubs
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Boys graphic novels and book clubs

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  1. Boys, Graphic Novels, and Book Clubs Katie, Betsy and Sia Intro to School Libraries Roundtable Discussion
  2. Boys and Books How can library media specialists motivate boys to read?
  3. Why is it important? <ul><li>“ National studies show that boys read an average of 1.5 grade levels behind girls” (Ford 18). </li></ul><ul><li>“ The U.S. Department of Education reading tests for the last 30 years show boys scoring worse than girls in every age group, every year” (Scieszka). </li></ul><ul><li>A 2001 national survey showed that 39.3% of 14 year old boys thought reading was boring, 11.1% preferred to do something else, and 4.3% felt that they weren’t good at reading (McFann) </li></ul><ul><li>“ If we want to transform boys into lifelong readers, we need to discover what makes them tick. Equally important, we need to have a better grasp of the kind of reading that attracts them” (Sullivan 36). </li></ul>
  4. Five Important Facts <ul><li>“ When boys read, they need an extra jolt of sound, color, motion, or some physical stimulation” (Sullivan 36). </li></ul><ul><li>Boys to don’t see men reading books, so boys view reading as a female activity. </li></ul><ul><li>Most of the books that are assigned or encouraged by educators are fiction and emphasize characters’ feelings rather than actions. </li></ul><ul><li>Using a multisensory approach will engage boys. </li></ul><ul><li>They (boys) succeed better when working in groups, talking about what they are doing, and creating a final product” (Ford 18). </li></ul>
  5. What School Library Media Specialists Should Do <ul><li>Let boys choose what to read. </li></ul><ul><li>Promote books that boys are likely to be interested in. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>“ Expand our definition of reading. Include boy-friendly nonfiction, humor, comics, graphic novels, action- adventure, magazines, websites, and newspapers in school reading. Let boys know that all these materials count as reading” (Szcieszka). </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Try to provide male role models. Invite older males (fathers, community members, authors, staff, older students) to read to the students, display posters that represent males reading, look for male athletes that sponsor reading programs. </li></ul><ul><li>Plan activities that will appeal to boys’ desire to be active and/or competitive. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>“ Providing non-traditional activities can give boys and other reluctant learners a chance to succeed” (Ford 18). </li></ul></ul>
  6. Using Graphic Novels in Books Clubs for Boys <ul><li>Boys are more successful when working in collaborative groups and have the opportunity to discuss what they are doing (Ford 18). </li></ul><ul><li>Let boys choose what to read. </li></ul><ul><li>Promote books that boys are likely to be interested in. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>“ Expand our definition of reading. Include boy-friendly nonfiction, humor, comics, graphic novels, action- adventure, magazines, websites, and newspapers in school reading. Let boys know that all these materials count as reading” (Szcieszka). </li></ul></ul>
  7. Graphic Novels and School Libraries <ul><li>What is a graphic novel? </li></ul><ul><li>“ juxtaposed pictorial and other images in deliberate sequence, intended to convey information and/or produce an aesthetic response in the viewer” (McCloud 1994) </li></ul><ul><li>Why graphic novels? </li></ul><ul><li>Draws in reluctant readers </li></ul><ul><li>Helps students visualize story lines and emotions </li></ul><ul><li>Appeals to “Generation Visual” </li></ul><ul><li>Promotes recreational reading </li></ul>
  8. Types of Graphic Novels <ul><li>Classic Superhero Novel </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Marvel, DC Comics (Superman & Spiderman) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Manga </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Japanese serials associated with anime style (Reads from right to left) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Stand-Alone Classics </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Single works </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Adaptations </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Author adaptations of novels into graphic format in conjunction with artist </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Non-Fiction </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Information material presented in a graphic format </li></ul></ul>
  9. Examples of Graphic Novels
  10. 5 Quintessential Facts About Graphic Novels <ul><li>Graphic novels. . . </li></ul><ul><li>appear in many styles and formats </li></ul><ul><li>vary in reading levels and maturity </li></ul><ul><li>can appeal to visual learners and reluctant readers </li></ul><ul><li>can support curriculum through nonfiction titles </li></ul><ul><li>have popularity, and are supported by circulation statistics* </li></ul><ul><li>Young, Robyn. &quot;Graphically Speaking: the Importance of Graphic Books in a School Library Collection.&quot; Library Media Connection 25.4 (Jan. 2007): 26-28. </li></ul>
  11. Tips for School Library Media Specialists <ul><li>Research different types of graphic novels that are published </li></ul><ul><li>Use credible reviewing sources, such as YALSA, field journal and websites ( www.noflyingnotights.com ) </li></ul><ul><li>Be familiar with industry content rating system </li></ul><ul><li>Be aware of circulation statistics and budget constraints </li></ul><ul><li>Remember your audience is everyone! </li></ul>
  12. Boys and Graphic Novels <ul><li>Highly visual </li></ul><ul><li>Often Action-packed </li></ul><ul><li>Often humorous </li></ul><ul><li>Popular characters (heroes) </li></ul>
  13. Book Clubs (Reading Groups, Reading Workshops, Literature Circles) By Katie Jasper “ A book club, also referred to as a reading group, is a collection of readers who participate in the regular discussion of books. Traditionally, a book club consists of several members who meet in person each month to talk about a specific work” <Book-clubs-resource.com>
  14. Topic Question <ul><li>How are book clubs beneficial to students? </li></ul>
  15. Why Book Clubs in the Library? Book clubs are a great technique to engage the disengaged reader! <ul><li>No academic expectations </li></ul><ul><li>Safe environment </li></ul><ul><li>Voluntary participation </li></ul><ul><li>Fun and engaging </li></ul><ul><li>Opportunity to take part in different social settings/leadership roles </li></ul><ul><li>Make friends </li></ul><ul><li>Connections </li></ul><ul><li>Promotes higher level of thinking </li></ul><ul><li>Facilitates learning for a diverse set of learners </li></ul><ul><li>Promotes love of books </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Efferent (analytical approach) vs. Aesthetic (pleasure reading) </li></ul></ul>
  16. How do book clubs work? <ul><li>Teacher is seen as the facilitator </li></ul><ul><li>Student choice </li></ul><ul><li>Groups should be formed around interests, or commonalities </li></ul><ul><li>Create safe environment </li></ul><ul><li>Choose group roles </li></ul><ul><li>Assessment </li></ul>
  17. Book Clubs for Boys Using Graphic Novels <ul><li>High Interest </li></ul><ul><li>Validation of reading materials </li></ul><ul><li>Difficult materials presented in a way that’s not overwhelming </li></ul><ul><li>Opportunities for the use of multiple intelligences </li></ul><ul><li>No academic expectations </li></ul><ul><li>Forum for boys to feel comfortable discussing literature </li></ul>
  18. References <ul><li>Ford, Deborah. “Scary, Gross, and Enlightening: Books for Boys.” Library Media Connection Jan./Feb. 2009: 18-19. </li></ul><ul><li>Lyga, Allyson A.W. and Lyga, Barry. Graphic Novels in Your Media Center: A Definitive Guide . Libraries Unlimited, Westport, CT: 2004. </li></ul><ul><li>McFann, Jane. “Boys and Books.” Reading Today Aug/Sep 2004: 20-21. </li></ul><ul><li>Scieszka, Jon. <http://www.guysread.com> </li></ul><ul><li>Sullivan, Michael. “Why Johnny Won’t read.” School Library Journal Aug. 2004: 36-39. </li></ul><ul><li>Young, Robyn. &quot;Graphically Speaking: the Importance of Graphic Books in a School Library Collection.&quot; Library Media Connection 25.4 (Jan. 2007): 26-28. </li></ul>

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