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Irrv Presentation Lbbd Havering June 09[1]
Irrv Presentation Lbbd Havering June 09[1]
Irrv Presentation Lbbd Havering June 09[1]
Irrv Presentation Lbbd Havering June 09[1]
Irrv Presentation Lbbd Havering June 09[1]
Irrv Presentation Lbbd Havering June 09[1]
Irrv Presentation Lbbd Havering June 09[1]
Irrv Presentation Lbbd Havering June 09[1]
Irrv Presentation Lbbd Havering June 09[1]
Irrv Presentation Lbbd Havering June 09[1]
Irrv Presentation Lbbd Havering June 09[1]
Irrv Presentation Lbbd Havering June 09[1]
Irrv Presentation Lbbd Havering June 09[1]
Irrv Presentation Lbbd Havering June 09[1]
Irrv Presentation Lbbd Havering June 09[1]
Irrv Presentation Lbbd Havering June 09[1]
Irrv Presentation Lbbd Havering June 09[1]
Irrv Presentation Lbbd Havering June 09[1]
Irrv Presentation Lbbd Havering June 09[1]
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Irrv Presentation Lbbd Havering June 09[1]

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A success story on collaborative and partnership working across 2 councils to collect Business Rates

A success story on collaborative and partnership working across 2 councils to collect Business Rates

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  • Profile of Barking & Dagenham Population of 168,000 living in 69,000 households By 2020 – will increase to 175,000 – 205,000 Higher proportion of older & younger people than London average BME community – 6.8% (1991), 15% (2001) now 23% Historically – stable white working class; increasing diversity = opportunities; but pace of change is a challenge Low levels of literacy & basic skills, but improving High areas of deprivation & some health inequalities London Borough of Havering Where - Romford , Hornchurch & Upminster 3rd Largest London borough in geographical size 100,000 Council Tax properties Highest proportion of elderly in London (23% over 60) Council is the largest employer in the borough and vast majority of staff (70%) live in the borough 2 significant areas of deprivation Major regeneration planned , Thames Gateway , Olympics & Harold Hill Almost half the borough is green space
  • Feb 07: Initiation March-Aug 07: The ICT implementation phase Sept 07: Implementation of formal Project Method Jan 08: Academy Go-live Jan 08: Shared ICT support workstream golive April 08: Business Rates workstream golive
  • Transcript

    • 1. SHARED BUSINESS RATES IN THE EAST END: OUR JOURNEY London Borough of Barking & Dagenham London Borough of Havering Head of B&D Direct Head of Exchequer Services Bola Odunsi Jeff Potter
    • 2. OVERVIEW
      • Background
      • Historical Context
      • Status and Drivers
      • Process
      • Project Management
      • Governance
      • Issues
      • What We Learnt
      • What is essential to make this work
    • 3. City K & C Merton Havering Barking Redbridge Newham Bexley Greenwich Lewisham Bromley Southwark Croydon Sutton Kingston Upon Thames Richmond Upon Thames Hounslow Ealing Hillingdon Harrow Brent Barnet Enfield Haringey Waltham Forest Hackney Islington Camden Lambeth H & F Wandsworth & Dagenham Westminster Tower Hamlets ‘ ’ ‘ ’ ‘ ’ ‘ ’ ‘ ’
    • 4. CONTEXT AND BACKGROUND Con. Labour Political Control 76,799,551.99 55,868,560.33 Debit 99.2 99.7 NNDR Collection Performance 06/07 98.6 99.2 NNDR Collection Performance 07/08 6 7.5 Staff, before Shared Service (FTE) 220! Top 20 Deprivation 5,557 4,149 Hereditaments LBH LBBD Element
    • 5. HISTORICAL CONTEXT
      • NELP: A Framework for low level co-operation
      • London Centre Excellence: Agreed to fund scoping study
      • Oct 06: LBH Invite tenders for Feasibility study
      • 4 Tenders: KPMG, PWC, IRRV Solutions, LG Solutions
      • Dec 06: Contract to IRRV Solutions
      • Jan 07: Feasibility study begins
      • Feb 07:Joint Business Rates Implementation begins
      • July 07: Feasibility Study ends
    • 6. DRIVERS FOR CHANGE  Savings  Improved Performance   How to share risk, and returns   Key staff changes allow opportunity to change   Value for Money   Making it work & learning the modelling lessons   Service Resilience LBH LBBD Element
    • 7. PROCESS
      • Its not just as simple as signing it off yourself!
      • Authorisation and Approval: Internal
        • Legal
        • Finance
        • Programme Office (IT Strategy & Programme Board)
      • Authorisation and approval:
        • Each Council’s formal Committee process
        • Managing the comms, the process and the members
    • 8. PROJECT MANAGEMENT
      • Using a good process: The LBH Team and toolkit
      • LBH Project manager deployed
      • Specialist external support
      • Project toolkit - Project Board, PID, Risk Register and management, Project Plan, Project exception and regular reporting
      • Project Timeline
    • 9. PARTNERSHIP GOVERNANCE
      • Shadow BoardDrafting the documents
      • Producing, and signing:
        • Formal contract
        • Service Level Agreement, for Rates (LBBD to LBH) and ICT(LBH to LBBD)
      • Migrating from Project to Operational management
        • Project Board, Oct 06-March 07
        • Governance Board, April 07 to date
      • Board membership: 4 Service heads (or deputies) 2 each
      • Board voting, meeting etc: Detailed in Partnership Documents
    • 10. ISSUES: FINANCIAL
      • Implementation costs:
        • Managed through Board
        • Initially came in under budget
      • Business Case for change
        • Fully costed five year model
        • Includes cost sharing of each party, and basis for variation
      • VAT issue
        • Systems hosting eligible for VAT, but..
        • Collection function not eligible for VAT .
    • 11. HR ISSUES
      • TUPE: Not relevant to this implementation because no staff transferred
      • Staff employed by lead authority, under that Council’s T and C’s
      • Appropriate clauses in contract
      • Joint approach to recruitment
      • Staff before: 13.5 After: 10
    • 12. OPERATIONAL ISSUES
      • Connectivity
      • Scanning and Indexing
      • Telephones
      • BIDs
      • Income and Court costs
      • Recovery arrangements
      • Bailiffs
      • Reconciliations
    • 13. POST GO LIVE ARRANGEMENTS
      • Governance Board
      • Change control
      • Performance
      • Staffing
      • Disaster Recovery/Business Continuity
      • Operational Board
      • Day to day performance
      • Operational liaison
      • Building relationships
    • 14. LESSONS LEARNT
      • Don’t underestimate cultural differences
      • Manage relationships
      • Managing the transfer from Project to Operational
      • Engage with key departments early: Usually finance, legal, ICT, HR
      • Don’t underestimate timescales for approval process
      • Carried out Lessons learnt exercise –post go LIVE & will also do 1 year follow-up session
    • 15. WHAT IS ESSENTIAL TO MAKE THIS WORK?
      • Common vision, values and will
      • Culture of Shared Service: Merger vs. Takeover?
        • Take-over means the one partner has more influence
        • Merger means more equality in negotiations
      • Effective project management
      • Effective governance
      • Effective communication
      • Identify your own internal blockers!
      • But it can be made to work.
    • 16. SIGNS OF A HEALTHY STRATEGIC PARTNERSHIP (1) Signs Of A Healthy Strategic Partnership Never Sometimes Always Partners can demonstrate real results through collaboration. Common interest supersedes partner interest, there are clear shared objectives and a realistic plan for reaching the objectives. Partners use “we” when talking about Partner matters. Partners are mutually accountable for tasks and outcomes and there is a clear framework of responsibilities. Partners share responsibilities and rewards.
    • 17. SIGNS OF A HEALTHY STRATEGIC PARTNERSHIP (2) Partners exhibit an ability to problem solve with each other Partners exhibit an ability to manage differences Never Sometimes Always Partners strive to develop and maintain trust. Partners are willing to change what they do and how they do it. Partners seek to improve how the partnership performs and there are realistic ways of measuring the partnership achievements. Commitment from partners to take the partnership work into account within mainstream activities.
    • 18. MAKING PARTNERSHIPS WORK Leadership Where partners share a vision and harness their energies to achieve more than they could on their own. Trust Where partners are mutually accountable, share risks and rewards fairly, and support each other. Learning Where partners continuously seek to improve what they do in partnership. Managing for performance Where partners put in place necessary practices and resources, and manage change effectively.
    • 19. THANK YOU
      • ANY QUESTIONS?

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