Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Team Excellence by Tim Noakes
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Team Excellence by Tim Noakes

1,339

Published on

Tim Noakes' presentation on Sport Team Excellence at the annual GBE Conference, Lord Charles, Somerset West, South Africa on 1 October 2010

Tim Noakes' presentation on Sport Team Excellence at the annual GBE Conference, Lord Charles, Somerset West, South Africa on 1 October 2010

Published in: Sports, News & Politics
0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
1,339
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
21
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Professor TD Noakes OMS, MBChB, MD, DSc, FACSM,Professor TD Noakes OMS, MBChB, MD, DSc, FACSM, (hon) FFSEM(UK)(hon) FFSEM(UK) Discovery Health Professor of Exercise and Sports ScienceDiscovery Health Professor of Exercise and Sports Science MRC/UCT Research Unit for Exercise Science and Sports Medicine,MRC/UCT Research Unit for Exercise Science and Sports Medicine, University of Cape Town andUniversity of Cape Town and Sports Science Institute of South AfricaSports Science Institute of South Africa GBE Pursuing Excellence ConferenceGBE Pursuing Excellence Conference Somerset West • 1Somerset West • 1stst October 2010October 2010
  • 2. Beijing Olympics 4 x 100m Freestyle final.Beijing Olympics 4 x 100m Freestyle final. Jason Lezak vs Allain Bernard. WhatJason Lezak vs Allain Bernard. What will happen to Phelp’s Gold Medal?will happen to Phelp’s Gold Medal? +0.37+0.3747.21 (2)47.21 (2)47.58 (5)47.58 (5)20082008 +0.39+0.3948.12 (2)48.12 (2)48.51 (8)48.51 (8)20072007 DifferenceDifferenceBernardBernardLezakLezakYearYear
  • 3. How good was Jason Lezak’s performance in theHow good was Jason Lezak’s performance in the Beijing Olympics 4 x 100m Freestyle final?Beijing Olympics 4 x 100m Freestyle final? +0.46+0.4647.21 (1)47.21 (1)47.67 (3)47.67 (3)2008 Beijing2008 Beijing Olympics 100mOlympics 100m finalfinal -0.67*-0.67* (-0.90 for(-0.90 for final 50m)final 50m) 46.7346.7346.0646.062008 Beijing2008 Beijing Olympics 4 xOlympics 4 x 100m final100m final +0.48+0.4846.94 (2)46.94 (2)47.78 (11)47.78 (11)20092009 +0.37+0.3747.21 (2)47.21 (2)47.58 (5)47.58 (5)20082008 +0.39+0.3948.12 (2)48.12 (2)48.51 (8)48.51 (8)20072007 DifferenceDifferenceBernardBernardLezakLezakYearYear ** fastest swim in the race by 0.57 secondsfastest swim in the race by 0.57 seconds 4days4days
  • 4. The Springboks use theirThe Springboks use their brains to win the 2007 Rugbybrains to win the 2007 Rugby World CupWorld Cup
  • 5. Key focus of support to the 2004-2007 Springboks Coach’s focus - Consistency of selection to field the most experienced Springbok team of all time in the 2007 Rugby World Cup Medical team’s focus - To insure that the best 22To insure that the best 22 players were injury-free and in peak condition for theplayers were injury-free and in peak condition for the most important games at the 2007 Rugby World Cupmost important games at the 2007 Rugby World Cup
  • 6. Success in sport is aSuccess in sport is a matter of inchesmatter of inches Success demands aSuccess demands a total commitmenttotal commitment to perfectionto perfection
  • 7. Hans Selye’s General Adaptation SyndromeHans Selye’s General Adaptation Syndrome Hans Selye (1957). The Stress of Life.Hans Selye (1957). The Stress of Life. Level ofLevel of normalnormal resistanceresistance AlarmAlarm reactionreaction Stage of resistanceStage of resistance Stage ofStage of exhaustionexhaustion StressStress R.I.PR.I.P Goal: Springboks 2007 Rugby World CupGoal: Springboks 2007 Rugby World Cup
  • 8. Hans Selye’s General Adaptation SyndromeHans Selye’s General Adaptation Syndrome Hans Selye (1957). The Stress of Life.Hans Selye (1957). The Stress of Life. Level ofLevel of normalnormal resistanceresistance AlarmAlarm reactionreaction Stage of resistanceStage of resistance Stage ofStage of exhaustionexhaustion StressStress R.I.PR.I.P Springboks at the 2007 Rugby World CupSpringboks at the 2007 Rugby World Cup England (Wilkinson)England (Wilkinson) All Blacks (Carter)All Blacks (Carter) Wallabies (Larkham)Wallabies (Larkham) Ireland (entire team)Ireland (entire team) Fourteen SpringboksFourteen Springboks played too muchplayed too much rugby in 2009 andrugby in 2009 and now already in 2010now already in 2010 There is always a costThere is always a cost
  • 9. The Springboks use theirThe Springboks use their brains to win the 2007 Rugbybrains to win the 2007 Rugby World CupWorld Cup Margins of success inMargins of success in international sport areinternational sport are disappearingly smalldisappearingly small Focusing on physicalFocusing on physical preparation is likely topreparation is likely to produce burnoutproduce burnout Something more isSomething more is requiredrequired
  • 10. The hidden aspects of team preparation Self beliefSelf belief
  • 11. Roger Bannister (UK)Roger Bannister (UK) 3:59.43:59.4 66thth May 1954May 1954 ““Mile of the Century”Mile of the Century” Vancouver Empire GamesVancouver Empire Games Saturday 7Saturday 7thth August 1954August 1954 John Landy (AUS)John Landy (AUS) 3:58.03:58.0 2121stst June 1954June 1954 The Race to be the first to runThe Race to be the first to run the mile in less thanthe mile in less than 4 minutes4 minutes SirSir The GovernorThe Governor Self - CoachedSelf - Coached Coached by an AustralianCoached by an Australian Franz StampflFranz Stampfl
  • 12. Progress in the Mile record 1931 - 1954Progress in the Mile record 1931 - 1954 3:543:54 4:004:00 4:064:06 4:124:12 Time (min:sec)Time (min:sec) 77 YearsYears 99 YearsYears Glen Cunningham 1934Glen Cunningham 1934 Jules Ladoumegue 1931Jules Ladoumegue 1931 Sidney Wooderson 1937Sidney Wooderson 1937 Jack Lovelock 1933Jack Lovelock 1933 Gunder Haegg 1942Gunder Haegg 1942 Arne Andersson 1942Arne Andersson 1942 Gunder Haegg 1942Gunder Haegg 1942 Arne Andersson 1943Arne Andersson 1943 Arne Andersson 1944Arne Andersson 1944 Gunder Haegg 1945Gunder Haegg 1945 Glen Cunningham 1934Glen Cunningham 1934 Jules Ladoumegue 1931Jules Ladoumegue 1931 Sidney Wooderson 1937Sidney Wooderson 1937 Jack Lovelock 1933Jack Lovelock 1933 Gunder Haegg 1942Gunder Haegg 1942 Arne Andersson 1942Arne Andersson 1942 Gunder Haegg 1942Gunder Haegg 1942 Arne Andersson 1943Arne Andersson 1943 Arne Andersson 1944Arne Andersson 1944 77 YearsYears ““Frankly, I think the four minuteFrankly, I think the four minute mile is beyond my capabilities.mile is beyond my capabilities. Two seconds may not sound much,Two seconds may not sound much, but to me it’s like trying to breakbut to me it’s like trying to break through a brick wall. Someone maythrough a brick wall. Someone may achieve the four-minute mile theachieve the four-minute mile the world is wanting so desperately,world is wanting so desperately, but I don’t think I can”.but I don’t think I can”. John Landy, 1954John Landy, 1954
  • 13. Progress in the Mile record 1931 - 1954Progress in the Mile record 1931 - 1954 3:543:54 4:004:00 4:064:06 4:124:12 Time (min:sec)Time (min:sec) 77 YearsYears 99 YearsYears 46 days46 days Glen Cunningham 1934Glen Cunningham 1934 Jules Ladoumegue 1931Jules Ladoumegue 1931 Sidney Wooderson 1937Sidney Wooderson 1937 Jack Lovelock 1933Jack Lovelock 1933 Roger Bannister 1954Roger Bannister 1954 Gunder Haegg 1942Gunder Haegg 1942 Arne Andersson 1942Arne Andersson 1942 Gunder Haegg 1942Gunder Haegg 1942 Arne Andersson 1943Arne Andersson 1943 Arne Andersson 1944Arne Andersson 1944 Gunder Haegg 1945Gunder Haegg 1945 John Landy 1954John Landy 1954 Glen Cunningham 1934Glen Cunningham 1934 Jules Ladoumegue 1931Jules Ladoumegue 1931 Sidney Wooderson 1937Sidney Wooderson 1937 Jack Lovelock 1933Jack Lovelock 1933 Gunder Haegg 1942Gunder Haegg 1942 Arne Andersson 1942Arne Andersson 1942 Gunder Haegg 1942Gunder Haegg 1942 Arne Andersson 1943Arne Andersson 1943 Arne Andersson 1944Arne Andersson 1944 77 YearsYears ““Frankly, I think the four minuteFrankly, I think the four minute mile is beyond my capabilities.mile is beyond my capabilities. Two seconds may not sound much,Two seconds may not sound much, but to me it’s like trying to breakbut to me it’s like trying to break through a brick wall. Someone maythrough a brick wall. Someone may achieve the four-minute mile theachieve the four-minute mile the world is wanting so desperately,world is wanting so desperately, but I don’t think I can”.but I don’t think I can”. John Landy, 1954John Landy, 1954
  • 14. The influence of Australian coachThe influence of Australian coach Franz StampflFranz Stampfl ““The crucial thing that he (Stampfl)The crucial thing that he (Stampfl) said was: ‘Well I think you can run asaid was: ‘Well I think you can run a 3:56 mile. If he believed that - I hope3:56 mile. If he believed that - I hope he did - it certainly was a helpfulhe did - it certainly was a helpful comment.comment. And he said if you have theAnd he said if you have the chance and you don’t take it you maychance and you don’t take it you may regret it for the rest of your liferegret it for the rest of your life”.”. Sir Roger Bannister. May 6th, 1954.Sir Roger Bannister. May 6th, 1954.
  • 15. N. Bascomb. Excerpts from The Perfect Mile. P.264N. Bascomb. Excerpts from The Perfect Mile. P.264 The role of the coachThe role of the coach Chris Chatataway best explained what theseChris Chatataway best explained what these conversations with their coach provided: ‘It wasconversations with their coach provided: ‘It was a sort of pre-race mental calisthenics. I woulda sort of pre-race mental calisthenics. I would say I was tired, and he would explain why hesay I was tired, and he would explain why he was absolutely convinced that mywas absolutely convinced that my finishing burst would be strong.finishing burst would be strong. In a way, I knew he didn’t knowIn a way, I knew he didn’t know any better than I did whether orany better than I did whether or not I would win, because it was anot I would win, because it was a totally unknown quantity, buttotally unknown quantity, but just hearing someone say thejust hearing someone say the things … was useful’.things … was useful’.
  • 16. The influence of Coach StampflThe influence of Coach Stampfl ““Training is principally an act ofTraining is principally an act of faith. The athlete must believe thatfaith. The athlete must believe that through training he will becomethrough training he will become fitter and stronger… He must believefitter and stronger… He must believe that through training histhat through training his performances will improve andperformances will improve and continue to improve indefinitely ascontinue to improve indefinitely as long as he continues to train tolong as he continues to train to progressively stiffer standards”.progressively stiffer standards”. Franz Stampfl, 1954.Franz Stampfl, 1954. ““The great hurdle was theThe great hurdle was the mental barrier”.mental barrier”. Franz Stampfl, 1954.Franz Stampfl, 1954.
  • 17. The philosophy of Coach StampflThe philosophy of Coach Stampfl ““Its simple.Its simple. All you have to doAll you have to do isis want to do it enoughwant to do it enough,, then go and do it”.then go and do it”. Franz Stampfl, 1954.Franz Stampfl, 1954.
  • 18. Let’s talk about goals,” he began.Let’s talk about goals,” he began. “What do you think you can do a mile in?”“What do you think you can do a mile in?” ““This year?” I said. “Oh, I don’t know,This year?” I said. “Oh, I don’t know, maybe-”maybe-” ““Not this year,” interrupted the coach. “INot this year,” interrupted the coach. “I mean by the time you’re a senior…mean by the time you’re a senior… ultimately.”ultimately.” I’d never really given it any thought. “II’d never really given it any thought. “I maybe 4:10,” I said… “I’m talking aboutmaybe 4:10,” I said… “I’m talking about the four-minute mile, Jim. No high schoolthe four-minute mile, Jim. No high school boy has ever run one. I think you can beboy has ever run one. I think you can be the first… I’m convinced you can do it.”…the first… I’m convinced you can do it.”… “Coach, I think you’re crazy!“Coach, I think you’re crazy!
  • 19. At the time, I had no idea what a four-minute mileAt the time, I had no idea what a four-minute mile signified. … I was only fifteen years old, basically still asignified. … I was only fifteen years old, basically still a child. …He was certain of my ability, even if I wasn’tchild. …He was certain of my ability, even if I wasn’t myself. He had already tutored several very successfulmyself. He had already tutored several very successful milers and believed in his coaching system. …As difficult asmilers and believed in his coaching system. …As difficult as it was to make the adjustment to consider myself ait was to make the adjustment to consider myself a champion, a front runner, as a “good” athlete, I did my bestchampion, a front runner, as a “good” athlete, I did my best to trust in the coach’s judgment and to believe his words.to trust in the coach’s judgment and to believe his words. Though I was initially dumbfounded by his prediction, itThough I was initially dumbfounded by his prediction, it did in fact prove not only to be accurate but to set me ondid in fact prove not only to be accurate but to set me on target for what would be the essence of my life for sometarget for what would be the essence of my life for some time to come.time to come.
  • 20. Paul Tergat, KenyaPaul Tergat, Kenya Hendrik RamaalaHendrik Ramaala South AfricaSouth Africa ““What I realise is that once the mind acceptsWhat I realise is that once the mind accepts anything, the body will respond. … If you don’tanything, the body will respond. … If you don’t convince yourself that you are going to win, thenconvince yourself that you are going to win, then you aren’t going to win it. For New York, I haveyou aren’t going to win it. For New York, I have to tell myself thousands of times that I am goingto tell myself thousands of times that I am going to win this thing. I have done it before and Ito win this thing. I have done it before and I must do it again – before the start, at the start,must do it again – before the start, at the start, during the race and at the finish. I have to tellduring the race and at the finish. I have to tell myself that I am going to win it and that I ammyself that I am going to win it and that I am better than the other guys.better than the other guys. You have to talk toYou have to talk to yourself otherwise you are not going to win…yourself otherwise you are not going to win… You have to say: ‘Whatever happens I am goingYou have to say: ‘Whatever happens I am going to win’.to win’. In my opinion, the person who wins theIn my opinion, the person who wins the race has already won it inside his head beforerace has already won it inside his head before the start of the racethe start of the race”.”. Hendrik Ramaala - Lawyer - Johannesburg, South AfricaHendrik Ramaala - Lawyer - Johannesburg, South Africa But how might self- belief moderate the sensations of fatigue that develop during exercise?
  • 21. Josia ThugwaneJosia Thugwane 1996 Olympic Marathon Champion1996 Olympic Marathon Champion 3 seconds is not due3 seconds is not due to physiologyto physiology.. SecondSecond but stillbut still alive.alive. Winner byWinner by 3 seconds.3 seconds. NotNot absolutelyabsolutely fatigued.fatigued. CouldCould have runhave run faster.faster. If the brain regulates exerciseIf the brain regulates exercise performance as we now believe,performance as we now believe, then the athlete who wins likelythen the athlete who wins likely “chooses” that outcome by“chooses” that outcome by believing he (or she) is lessbelieving he (or she) is less fatigued than are his or herfatigued than are his or her competitorscompetitors
  • 22. The role of self-beliefThe role of self-belief ““You have just won theYou have just won the under-21 Rugby World Cup.under-21 Rugby World Cup. You will win the 2007 RugbyYou will win the 2007 Rugby World Cup”.World Cup”. Jake White on his first meeting with theJake White on his first meeting with the Springboks - May 2004Springboks - May 2004
  • 23. J. White with Craig Ray. In Black and White p.1, 2007.J. White with Craig Ray. In Black and White p.1, 2007. What are my dreams for the future? MyWhat are my dreams for the future? My greatest dream is to play rugby, especiallygreatest dream is to play rugby, especially for the Springboks. But even to become theirfor the Springboks. But even to become their coach.coach. I have seen how you canI have seen how you can make people believe inmake people believe in themselvesthemselves; how you can; how you can show people that everyshow people that every single person can be asingle person can be a winner if you want it.winner if you want it. Seventeen year-old Jake White’s essaySeventeen year-old Jake White’s essay on his future goalson his future goals
  • 24. In the end, the playersIn the end, the players achieved what the coachachieved what the coach said they would on the firstsaid they would on the first day he coached them.day he coached them.
  • 25. Gentlemen,” Bryant continued,Gentlemen,” Bryant continued, “life’s battles don’t always go“life’s battles don’t always go to the stronger or faster man.to the stronger or faster man. But sooner or later, the manBut sooner or later, the man who wins is the one who thinkswho wins is the one who thinks he can.he can.
  • 26. If you believe in yourself andIf you believe in yourself and have dedication and pride – andhave dedication and pride – and never quit – you’ll be a winner.never quit – you’ll be a winner. The price of victory is high, butThe price of victory is high, but so are the rewards.so are the rewards. Paul “Bear” BryantPaul “Bear” Bryant
  • 27. “Joe Montana came to the San Francisco 49ers believing he was extraordinary”. “My job was to convince him that he was beyond extraordinary”. Coach Bill Walsh 5 NFL Super Bowl victories in 12 years
  • 28. ““Winning is not a sometimes thing; it’sWinning is not a sometimes thing; it’s an all-the-time thing. You don’t winan all-the-time thing. You don’t win once in a while, you don’t do thingsonce in a while, you don’t do things right once in a while, you do them rightright once in a while, you do them right all the time. Winning is a habit.all the time. Winning is a habit. Unfortunately so is losing”.Unfortunately so is losing”. Coach Vince LombardiCoach Vince Lombardi
  • 29. The hidden aspects of team preparation Self beliefSelf belief IntellectualismIntellectualism
  • 30. The Bob Dwyer ModelThe Bob Dwyer Model “…“… the preparation program has changed thethe preparation program has changed the player’s entire approach to the game. It hasplayer’s entire approach to the game. It has changed his understanding of how best to preparechanged his understanding of how best to prepare for a game, his understanding of his body as afor a game, his understanding of his body as a mechanical apparatus, his understanding of hismechanical apparatus, his understanding of his own physiology.own physiology. Our experience with theOur experience with the Australian team has confirmed my belief thatAustralian team has confirmed my belief that education is itself a motivational tooleducation is itself a motivational tool. The more a. The more a players knows about his body, the better heplayers knows about his body, the better he trains, and the better he trains, the fitter and moretrains, and the better he trains, the fitter and more powerful he becomes, which in turn encouragespowerful he becomes, which in turn encourages him to want to know more. This is why somehim to want to know more. This is why some Australian players absorbed the information fasterAustralian players absorbed the information faster than we could supply it”.than we could supply it”. Bob Dwyer - The Winning Way - 1992 p110Bob Dwyer - The Winning Way - 1992 p110 ““On the field the benefits of the program showedOn the field the benefits of the program showed up in an improved fitness, strength andup in an improved fitness, strength and explosiveness. The players’ mental attitude wasexplosiveness. The players’ mental attitude was changed, too. Because they knew they hadchanged, too. Because they knew they had prepared themselves well, they played with moreprepared themselves well, they played with more confidence.confidence. They really believed they were part ofThey really believed they were part of a top outfita top outfit. Another benefit, I have found, is that. Another benefit, I have found, is that the players are more receptive to technicalthe players are more receptive to technical evaluations of their performance.evaluations of their performance. In short, theyIn short, they have developed the mentality of the elite athletehave developed the mentality of the elite athlete who knows that it is the extra one per cent inwho knows that it is the extra one per cent in performance which seperates the best from theperformance which seperates the best from the second bestsecond best”.”. Bob Dwyer - The Winning Way - 1992 p110Bob Dwyer - The Winning Way - 1992 p110
  • 31. Multiple expert modelMultiple expert model
  • 32. The hidden aspects of team preparation CharacterCharacter IntellectualismIntellectualism Self beliefSelf belief
  • 33. The issue of characterThe issue of character Brown’s ideal player was one of impeccableBrown’s ideal player was one of impeccable character and intellect. His conception of building acharacter and intellect. His conception of building a successful football team was based on his determinationsuccessful football team was based on his determination that the game was as much about people as it was aboutthat the game was as much about people as it was about strategies, tactics and motivational techniques. Hestrategies, tactics and motivational techniques. He contended that if he placed the bestcontended that if he placed the best individualsindividuals (not(not necessarily the most talented football players) in thenecessarily the most talented football players) in the most advantageous positions, winning would almostmost advantageous positions, winning would almost come naturally. A Paul Brown individual was one whocome naturally. A Paul Brown individual was one who was totally devoted to winning football games and waswas totally devoted to winning football games and was willing to sacrifice his entire lifestyle in order to achievewilling to sacrifice his entire lifestyle in order to achieve that ambition.that ambition. Brad Adler. Coaching Matters (2003)Brad Adler. Coaching Matters (2003)
  • 34. The Issue of Character -The Issue of Character - And IntelligenceAnd Intelligence He had to possess an unselfish attitude and never putHe had to possess an unselfish attitude and never put personal considerations ahead of the organization’spersonal considerations ahead of the organization’s goal of championship football. In addition, Browngoal of championship football. In addition, Brown greatly valued a player’s learning capacity. ‘Knowing agreatly valued a player’s learning capacity. ‘Knowing a man’s capacity to learn before we drafted him helpedman’s capacity to learn before we drafted him helped us calculate his potential’. In Brown’s system hisus calculate his potential’. In Brown’s system his intelligence-level measurement was even moreintelligence-level measurement was even more important than it was with other teams.important than it was with other teams. He required every player to know the entire playbook.He required every player to know the entire playbook. Brown felt that if the players were aware of allBrown felt that if the players were aware of all functions on a given play, there was a much betterfunctions on a given play, there was a much better chance for a successful outcome.chance for a successful outcome. Brad Adler. Coaching Matters (2003)Brad Adler. Coaching Matters (2003)
  • 35. The hidden aspects of team preparation Concept of teamConcept of team CharacterCharacter IntellectualismIntellectualism Self beliefSelf belief
  • 36. But winning the Super Bowl is not the ultimateBut winning the Super Bowl is not the ultimate victory. And once again, just to make certain we’revictory. And once again, just to make certain we’re on the same page, it’s not all about football.on the same page, it’s not all about football. It’sIt’s about the journeyabout the journey – mine and yours – and– mine and yours – and the lives wethe lives we can touchcan touch, the, the legacy we can leavelegacy we can leave, and the world we, and the world we can change for the better.can change for the better. ……every year, the topic of my first talk at trainingevery year, the topic of my first talk at training camp iscamp is familyfamily. I want each guy to understand that. I want each guy to understand that his family is his first priority.his family is his first priority. ……but we’re still trying to develop that base. I wantbut we’re still trying to develop that base. I want an organization – and team – that emphasizesan organization – and team – that emphasizes character, values, and familycharacter, values, and family, and I want it to extend, and I want it to extend out into the community in a meaningful way.out into the community in a meaningful way. The final irony is thatThe final irony is that sport is not actually aboutsport is not actually about sport.sport. It is about individuals andIt is about individuals and teams and the search forteams and the search for an elusive perfection.an elusive perfection.

×