EmergencySituationsHelping Families Prepare forAndrew Behnke & Nichole Huff
If there were adisaster
If there were adisastertomorrow
wouldYOURbe ready?family
What would yoube ready for?
ice
flood
hurricane
fire
tornado
drought
what is thelikelihood
of each?what is thelikelihood
of each?what is thelikelihoodwhere you live.
Aretheready?familiesyou serve
simple things
make a familyplan
meeting place
contact info
What’s thesafest place inyour home?
safe place inhomeone safe place
escape routes
power & watershutoffs
cash onhand
importantdocuments
insurance
batteries
What can’tyou dowith atrashbag?
would you know how to talk with kids?when tragedy strikes,
would they listen?
what would you sayif they witnessedthis…
or this…
or if they heardabout this…
or this…
could youcomfortthem?
could youease theirfears?
could youhelp?
prepareyourself
prepareyourself
listen
preparethem
plan with them
knowwhattosaywhen
ages & stages
preschoolers
Stick toregular familyroutines
Avoidunnecessaryseparations
Provide extracomfort andreassurance
practicewiththem
Permit a childto sleep in theparents roomtemporarily
Help them expressthemselves viaplay, drawing, andstory telling
Limit mediaexposure
ages & stages
elementaryage kids
Provide extraattention andconsideration
Set gentle butfirm limits foracting outbehavior
Listen to a childsrepeated telling ofhis/her experience
Point out kinddeeds and the waysin which peoplehelped during theevent
Limit mediaexposure
Rehearse safetymeasures for futureincidents
tweens andadolescents
Provide extraattention andconsideration
Be there to listento your children,but dont forcethem to talk
Encouragediscussion of eventamong peers
Help them serve
Healing is anevolving, but somemay needprofessional help
seek resources…national child traumatic stress networkhttp://www.nctsn.org
How arecouplesimpacted?
What do theyexperience?
foggy
uncertainty
conflict
starts as a couple planA family plan really
follow…eachother’slead
“Some call it a blind spot, othersnaïveté, but Mandela sees almosteveryone as virtuous untilproven otherwise. He starts wi...
childrenwatchhowparentsreactand actaccordingly
Emergencies and Families
Emergencies and Families
Emergencies and Families
Emergencies and Families
Emergencies and Families
Emergencies and Families
Emergencies and Families
Emergencies and Families
Emergencies and Families
Emergencies and Families
Emergencies and Families
Emergencies and Families
Emergencies and Families
Emergencies and Families
Emergencies and Families
Emergencies and Families
Emergencies and Families
Emergencies and Families
Emergencies and Families
Emergencies and Families
Emergencies and Families
Emergencies and Families
Emergencies and Families
Emergencies and Families
Emergencies and Families
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Emergencies and Families

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Dr. Andrew Behnke explains how to help families in times of emergency and disaster.

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  • Most of us say of course I am so ready. But
  • What is it you are ready for? Have you thought of all the possibilities?
  • More importantly. Do you know the actual likelihood of certain emergency situations are where you live? Ice storms or hurricanes might be more likely in one place. But think of Hugo which came through Charlotte. Or the Hurricane that produced mudslides in the mountains. It may look different but emergencies can happen anywhere. We hear about wildfires in California and in the WEST but we too have had wildfires in NC.
  • So maybe your ready but are the families you serve as ready?
  • Take some time to tell them about the simple things they can do to really make a difference.
  • We’ve all beentold to have a family plan but have wedoneit. A family plan doesn’t have to becreated all at once or beelaborate. But weshouldwork on it and writeit down. Plans that are written down are way more likely to becarried out.
  • FEMA has some great forms to help you get started. READYNC also has some really amazing tools and videos to help you.
  • Work out meeting places both closeby and a backup a bit further away.
  • Make sure you have a way to contact everyone you care about and a knowledge of where they would go in an emergency. Phone calls might not work in an emergency but text messages often go through since they use different towers and systems.
  • Make sure the family knows where to go in the home as the safest spot.
  • Make sure the family knows where to go in the home as the safest spot.
  • Every child should know how to escape there home safely in case of an emergency. This can make a great activity for families to do together. Draw their home and where they should go to escape. More than one route is a must, also point out things like the safest place in the home and the power and water shutoff valves. Children should know these .
  • In an emergency cash is king. It can take days and even weeks to get money in some emergency situations. We don’t suggest to have a lot of money but small bills can be very important in an emergency to get necesitities
  • Have your important docs in a waterproof. Fire proof location that is easy to move quicly. A safe is nice but not going to be easy in many situations.
  • Do you have all the insurance you need? What types would you suggest folks get?
  • 72 hour kits for every one. Do you have one ?
  • Gallon per person a little over 8 pounds so think of how it will be carried?
  • food
  • First aid is essential
  • In many emergencies batteries become the currency for the first 48 hours. Stock up when you can get a good deal. We have a lot of technology and gadgets and often few ways to power them up in emergencies.
  • We all know the rule of keeping our tank at least half full but who really does that? At least have a five gallon container if possible in your garage.
  • In many emergencies you will need supplies you didn’t think of.Trashbags are amazing to fix lots of things and keep things dry.
  • I have 5 kids from 13 down to 1.5 and they all need me to talk to them in certain ways. Its not all just their age and level of understanding. I always try to consider their personality as well. Some are more sensitive to some things.
  • Seasame Street ha created an amazing free workbook you can print to help parents work out an emergency plan with their kids. Lets check it out quickly. This is a great tool to share with parents and go through. Sort of a Sesame Street Version of the FEMA family plan.
  • We are often in relationships when emergencies happen. The couple dynamics have a huge impact on the outcomes of the situation.
  • In emergencies our first reactions are very clear due to neurotransmitters/ hormones like adrenaline (also called epinepherine) and dopamine.
  • But soon after those where off and we often feel like we are in a fog. This is when we generally experience break down with our couple relationships
  • We feel uncertain and unsure of our next steps
  • And its not to uncommon for those emotional frustrations to bubble over as conflict
  • This planning is essential. However it can be difficult at first both partners are in the crucible. Either partner or both may be very fragile at this time
  • Once you have worked out your plan bring the other family players in for a huddle
  • Fred Estair & Ginger Rogers
  • Take time to pause and allow some time outs to work on things. 10-10-20-20 rule.
  • Watch out for mines
  • Take time to pause and allow some time outs to work on things. 10-10-20-20 rule.
  • Now the trickiest part is bringing together the whole family and finding balance that works for them. Balance is delicate and not always sustainable but we pick up the blocks and try again. CUPS at my house experience.
  • Emergencies and Families

    1. 1. EmergencySituationsHelping Families Prepare forAndrew Behnke & Nichole Huff
    2. 2. If there were adisaster
    3. 3. If there were adisastertomorrow
    4. 4. wouldYOURbe ready?family
    5. 5. What would yoube ready for?
    6. 6. ice
    7. 7. flood
    8. 8. hurricane
    9. 9. fire
    10. 10. tornado
    11. 11. drought
    12. 12. what is thelikelihood
    13. 13. of each?what is thelikelihood
    14. 14. of each?what is thelikelihoodwhere you live.
    15. 15. Aretheready?familiesyou serve
    16. 16. simple things
    17. 17. make a familyplan
    18. 18. meeting place
    19. 19. contact info
    20. 20. What’s thesafest place inyour home?
    21. 21. safe place inhomeone safe place
    22. 22. escape routes
    23. 23. power & watershutoffs
    24. 24. cash onhand
    25. 25. importantdocuments
    26. 26. insurance
    27. 27. batteries
    28. 28. What can’tyou dowith atrashbag?
    29. 29. would you know how to talk with kids?when tragedy strikes,
    30. 30. would they listen?
    31. 31. what would you sayif they witnessedthis…
    32. 32. or this…
    33. 33. or if they heardabout this…
    34. 34. or this…
    35. 35. could youcomfortthem?
    36. 36. could youease theirfears?
    37. 37. could youhelp?
    38. 38. prepareyourself
    39. 39. prepareyourself
    40. 40. listen
    41. 41. preparethem
    42. 42. plan with them
    43. 43. knowwhattosaywhen
    44. 44. ages & stages
    45. 45. preschoolers
    46. 46. Stick toregular familyroutines
    47. 47. Avoidunnecessaryseparations
    48. 48. Provide extracomfort andreassurance
    49. 49. practicewiththem
    50. 50. Permit a childto sleep in theparents roomtemporarily
    51. 51. Help them expressthemselves viaplay, drawing, andstory telling
    52. 52. Limit mediaexposure
    53. 53. ages & stages
    54. 54. elementaryage kids
    55. 55. Provide extraattention andconsideration
    56. 56. Set gentle butfirm limits foracting outbehavior
    57. 57. Listen to a childsrepeated telling ofhis/her experience
    58. 58. Point out kinddeeds and the waysin which peoplehelped during theevent
    59. 59. Limit mediaexposure
    60. 60. Rehearse safetymeasures for futureincidents
    61. 61. tweens andadolescents
    62. 62. Provide extraattention andconsideration
    63. 63. Be there to listento your children,but dont forcethem to talk
    64. 64. Encouragediscussion of eventamong peers
    65. 65. Help them serve
    66. 66. Healing is anevolving, but somemay needprofessional help
    67. 67. seek resources…national child traumatic stress networkhttp://www.nctsn.org
    68. 68. How arecouplesimpacted?
    69. 69. What do theyexperience?
    70. 70. foggy
    71. 71. uncertainty
    72. 72. conflict
    73. 73. starts as a couple planA family plan really
    74. 74. follow…eachother’slead
    75. 75. “Some call it a blind spot, othersnaïveté, but Mandela sees almosteveryone as virtuous untilproven otherwise. He starts withan assumption you are dealingwith him in good faith. Hebelieves that, just as pretendingto be brave can lead to acts ofreal bravery, seeing the good inother people improves thechances that they will revealtheir better selves.”seth godin
    76. 76. childrenwatchhowparentsreactand actaccordingly
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