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The Passive

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This is an explanation of the use and form of Passive sentences in English for my Intermediate students

This is an explanation of the use and form of Passive sentences in English for my Intermediate students

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Transcript

  • 1. The Passive
  • 2. Use
    • We use a passive sentence when the subject is obvious or not important
      • Someone wrote a letter
      • A letter was written (by someone)
  • 3. Use
    • We often find passive sentences in newspapers, advertisements,reports, processes, scientific texts or official announcements, where the subject is usually unimportant
    • Some verbs are often used in the passive, specially in the news, for example:
    • to be arrested to be killed to be injured …
    • You’ll find more information about them on the vocabulary extension exercise
  • 4. Transforming active sentences Example
      • Someone wrote a letter
      • Subject + verb + object
      • A letter was written (by someone)
      • New subject + verb + agent
  • 5. Transforming active sentences Explanation
    • The object of the active sentence becomes the subject of the pasive one
    • The subject of the active becomes the agent in the passive sentence.
    • The agent is introduced by the preposition by and it can often be omitted.
  • 6. Forming the passive voice of the verb
    • We form the passive form of the verb with the corresponding form of the verb to be + a past participle
      • wrote – was written
      • Look at the text you have been given and see how many different examples of passive sentences in different tenses you can find
  • 7. Complete this chart
    • He washes the car
    • He is washing the car
    • He has washed the car
    • He washed the car
    • He was washing the car
    • He will wash the car
    • He can’t wash the car
    • The car is washed
    • The car is ……….
    • The car has ……… washed
    • The car ……………..
    • The car was ……….. washed
    • The car will ………….
    • The car ………………
  • 8. Check the chart
    • He washes the car
    • He is washing the car
    • He has washed the car
    • He washed the car
    • He was washing the car
    • He will wash the car
    • He can’t wash the car
    • The car is washed
    • The car is being washed
    • The car has been washed
    • The car was washed
    • The car was being washed
    • The car will be washed
    • The car can’t be washed
  • 9. Sentences with two objects
    • When the active sentence has two objects
      • Someone gave Mary some flowers
      • Subject + verb + indirect object + direct object
    • In English, we often place the indirect object as the subject of the new passive sentence
      • Mary was given some flowers
  • 10. Get some practice
    • You can start with the pair activity the teacher will soon give you
    • Then you can fill in some newspapers headlines with some common verbs in the passive (vocabulary extension)
    • At home, you can do the exercises in your workbook. You may ask for some extra material if you need more practice.
    • For even more exercises or for a better explanation, go to the grammar section in the blog
  • 11. Ana Sancho April 2009