When Will Indian Pharma Get its Act Together?

1,891 views
1,724 views

Published on

Inside this Issue
1. Indian Medical Advisors Summit by Dr. Amit Dang
Photo essay and briefing.

2. Digital Pharma by Chandan Kumar
Digital is changing the fundamentals of the marketplace. Here’s how pharma can keep pace.

3. Selling Across Cultures by Anup Soans and Joshua Soans
Chapter extract from the new book The Art of Modern Sales Management by Renie Mcclay.

4. What You Measure is What Gets Done by Hanno Wolfram
Performance metrics are often a trade-off between ease and value. Is “calls-per-day” a meaningless metric that needs immediate replacement?

5. Book Review: Unlealthy Practices by Anup Soans
Review of the new work of fiction by Dr. Sumit Ghoshal.

Published in: Business
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,891
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
4
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
41
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

When Will Indian Pharma Get its Act Together?

  1. 1. TM MEDICINMAN March 2014 | www.medicinman.net Field Force Excellence Since 2011 WHEN WILL PHARMA SALES GET ITS ACT TOGETHER? Editorial Behind Indian pharma’s rosy growth numbers lies a murky reality that will come to haunt the industry if it refuses to change its ways. H 1 | MedicinMan March 2014 as Indian Pharma’s efforts to increase its share of the voice through mega field forces led to the physician saying, “Spare me the noise” in exasperation? How many Medical Reps (MRs) meet the criteria when it comes to delivering real value to physicians they call on? Sure, there are companies that still deliver some value to physicians through their field force – these are tiny islands of excellence in a sea of mediocrity. The top 30 pharma companies with seventy percent market share have field forces in the region of 3000 to 5000 MRs and line managers. What percentage of this number actually delivers an acceptable ROI? The sheer number of MRs calling on physicians has led many hospitals to deploy positively hostile measures to stop them from entering the premises except on designated days and time. Menacing security guards are a new hurdle that MRs have to overcome to snatch 30 seconds from the increasingly reluctant-to-meet physician. This is in addition to the myriads of hurdles that they already face – chemists unwilling to stock, but blatantly substituting with brands that give maximum profits and distributors asking for money from hapless MRs and line managers to finance the purchase of goods that do not have a robust secondary demand. Surely, mega field forces are ineffective and their era is coming to an end?
  2. 2. Anup Soans | Editorial: When Will Pharma Sales Get Its Act Together? “ On one hand we have market reports that trumpet the double digit growth of Indian Pharma. But insiders say that cooked up sales figures where stocks keep rotating between distributors instead of being consumed by patients is a bubble waiting to burst even in some of the best run companies. This is one of the main reasons for high attrition – people want to move on before being caught with their pants down! ” KAM – Key Account Management MSL – Medical Science Liaison 2 | MedicinMan March 2014 Indian Pharma is unlikely to attract talent – why would anyone want to be abused and tasked with so many unpleasant chores every day? The job satisfaction quotient of an MR has reached its nadir in most mega field forces, where he is just a dispensable commodity. Companies that are keen to make a difference will have to find alternatives to rise above the cacophony created by mega sales forces or be drowned in unethical market practices that make IPL scams look like street side cricket. It is becoming increasingly difficult to assess the effectiveness of mega sales forces that do little more than peek-a-boo calls in the corridors and then get busy with their experienced sales managers in managing numbers through a dubious network of distributors. Perhaps, it is time to take the entire distribution network out of the ambit of sales teams and put in place supply chain specialists who can monitor and manage the movement of products more effectively. Anyway this task of ‘managing’ distributors takes most of the time of line managers, who should instead be spending that time on developing the skills of their team members. This is also perhaps the only way to eradicate the unethical practices that have become institutionalized by way of managing sales through Excel sheets instead of coaching MRs to generate prescriptions. Field forces must be spending time learning more about physicians and their patients to gain insights that can be useful in in-clinic interactions. On one hand we have market reports that trumpet the double digit growth of Indian Pharma. But insiders say that cooked up sales figures where stocks keep rotating between distributors instead of being consumed by patients is a bubble waiting to burst even in some of the best run companies. This is one of the main reasons for high attrition – people want to move on before being caught with their pants down! With USFDA breathing hard on Indian Pharma, the pressure on domestic sales will increase even more and nobody has any innovative ideas to expand the market or to address the unmet needs of physicians and patients, both of whom are looking for better experience, real value, and positive outcomes. In the present scenario, several companies introduce a particular product or product combination without the least understanding of the needs of patients. The emphasis is not on helping the physician better manage his patients but on how many prescriptions can a particular doctor give and what is needed to be given in return as gratification. The current crop of executives in sales and marketing may be dyed-in-the-wool to make the shift from current unproductive practices. Indian Pharma may need to look outside its perimeter for talent who can bring value to customers and satisfaction to patients and employees. We at MedicinMan have written about the importance of KAM in understanding and managing the business objectives of doctors as well as MSLs who can communicate science that helps the
  3. 3. Anup Soans | Editorial: When Will Pharma Sales Get Its Act Together? “ Indian Pharma will have to shift its focus from tactical, productcentric sales approach through mega field forces to a more strategic mindset, which creates effective segmentation based on patient profiles and other relevant differentiators and not just the specialty of the doctor and manage them through smaller, nimbler teams of KAMs and MSLs. ” doctor to better understand patient’s needs and ensure better outcomes. Perhaps it’s too early to do away with the large number of field forces, but the best among them can be picked up and prepared for KAM and MSL roles that deliver value to customers and satisfaction to patients. Indian Pharma will have to shift its focus from tactical, product-centric sales approach through mega field forces to a more strategic mindset, which creates effective segmentation based on patient profiles and other relevant differentiators and not just the specialty of the doctor and manage them through smaller, nimbler teams of KAMs and MSLs. Pharma will need better insight into how patients become aware of their ailment, how they choose a doctor and the lifetime value of patient compliance. Patient data – patient’s perception of benefits and side effects of a particular drug/therapy will hold the key to effective physician communication, longterm sales and new product introduction. Doctors will value information about patient’s experiences and perceptions, which will help them to better manage their patients. Better alignment between sales, marketing and medical affairs can create brands that resonate with customer’s aspiration and patient’s need. Pharma will have to learn from other industries like the wellness sector, which have made rapid strides despite questionable credentials and claims by resonating with customer aspirations. Pharma’s own communication capability leaves much to be desired – there is hardly any creativity or imagination to fire the enthusiasm of sales people or physicians. The packaging is mundane, product information is not very useful and the patient’s mind is filled with concerns of side effects instead of hopes of wellness. Pharma product managers have failed to communicate the role and benefits of modern medicine in ensuring good health. GlaxoSmithKline has fired the first salvo by structuring the emoluments if its field force around customer satisfaction instead of sales targets. This is commendable and one hopes that this is the beginning of a new era in pharma business at least for the companies who want to make a difference by being different. Meet the Editor Anup Soans is an Author, Facilitator and the Editor of MedicinMan. Write in to him: anupsoans@medicinman.net Connect with Anup Soans on LinkedIn | Facebook | Twitter Visit anupsoans.com. Indian Pharma is known for its entrepreneurial spirit and has demonstrated this by setting up more than 20,000 manufacturing units and an equally large number of propaganda cum distribution companies. Many of these have been started by pharma employees who saw the opportunity to serve a niche specialty market or geographic area. Transforming senior MRs and managers with demonstrated abilities into entrepreneurs in charge of their own micro-businesses is another opportunity that is worth exploring given India’s vast geographic spread both in cities and rural markets. Customer satisfaction and employee satisfaction are the pillars around which successful future pharma companies will be built. -AS
  4. 4. CONTENTS (Click to navigate) 1. Indian Medical Advisors Summit 2014.............5 Photo essay and briefing. Dr. Amit Dang 2. Digital Pharma...................................................7 MedicinMan Volume 4 Issue 3 | March 2014 Editor and Publisher Anup Soans CEO Chhaya Sankath Digital is changing the fundamentals of the marketplace. Here’s how pharma can keep pace. COO Chandan Kumar Chief Mentor Arvind Nair K. Hariram 3. Selling Across Cultures ..................................9 Chapter extract from the new book The Art of Modern Sales Management by Renie Mcclay Anup Soans and Joshua Soans 4. What You Measure is What Gets Done ...12 Performance metrics are often a trade-off between ease and value. Is “calls-per-day” a meaningless metric that needs immediate replacement? Hanno Wolfram Advisory Board Prof. Vivek Hattangadi; Jolly Mathews Editorial Board Salil Kallianpur; Dr. Shalini Ratan; Shashin Bodawala; Prabhakar Shetty; Vardarajan S; Dr. Mandar Kubal; Dr. Surinder Kumar International Editorial Board Hanno Wolfram; Renie McClay Executive Editor Joshua Soans 5. Book Review: Unhealthy Practices ............15 MedicinMan Academy: Review of the new work of fiction by Dr. Sumit Ghoshal. Development Anup Soans Prof. Vivek Hattangadi, Dean, Professional Skills Letters to the Editor: anupsoans@medicinman.net
  5. 5. E E INMAS 2014 I Indian Medical Advisor’s Summit - Feb 22, 2014 NMAS 2014 - Indian Medical Advisors Summit held on February 22, was a memorable day for Medical Affairs professionals. INMAS 2014 - Indian Medical Advisors Summit, convened by Dr. Amit Dang, Founder and Director, Geronimo Healthcare Solutions was held at “The Lalit”, Mumbai to interact, learn, share new ideas, best practices and case studies. INMAS 2014 was attended by over 100 delegates from Indian as well as MNC pharma companies and post graduate students of pharmacology. Highlights of INMAS 2014 • Dr. Viraj Suvarna, Medical Director, Boehringer Ingelheim, keynote speaker, set the tone by saying that the role of medical advisors was not a dilemma between medical affairs and business, but that they should own the business and their actions must flow from this sense of ownership. • Dr. Amit Garg, Head, Emerging Markets, Dr. Reddy’s Laboratories, explained how social media can be utilized to initiate, recruit and alter the outcomes of late phase studies. • Dr. Ganesh Kadhe, AVP – Medical Affairs and Clinical Operations, Wockhardt, speaking on internal and external stakeholder management, emphasized the need for GMAP or Good Medical Affairs Practices. He stressed that medical advisors should also excel in strategic thinking, basic commercial skills, cross-functional collaboration and teamwork. • Dr. Prashant Desai, Director – Medical Affairs, Janssen Pharmaceuticals, J & J, spoke on “How to make credible scientific presentations” by incorporating the six pillars of credibility - Ideation, Information, Influence, Integrity, Impact and Ignition. 5 | MedicinMan March 2014 • Dr. Aju Abraham Varghese, Sr. Medical Manager, Regional Medical Affairs, Pfizer India explained the role of field based Regional Medical Advisor (RMA) and their ability to respond to medical queries in real time adding much value to the efforts of field force.
  6. 6. INMAS 2014 • Dr. Rohit Arora, Director – Marketing (Paediatrics), Sanofi Pasteur India, spoke on “What medical advisor needs to know about regulatory expertise and NDAC (New Drug Advisory Committee) expectations. • Dr. Santosh Jha, Director – Medical Regulatory, Takeda Pharmaceuticals, talked about GPP (Good Promotional Practices) and marketing or science - what should be medical advisor’s priority? He stressed that GPP has been created to ensure that pharmaceutical companies should operate under the framework of high values of integrity and ethics keeping patient safety as its topmost priority. Dr. Viraj Suvarna Dr. Qayum Mukaddam • Dr. K. Karunakar Reddy, Head of Medical Affairs, Dr. Reddy’s Laboratories gave lot of insight on off-label as well as on-label use of medicines and on the importance of medical advisors to be updated on various regulations across the globe. • Dr. Vinita Satyavrat, Head – Scientific and Medical Affairs, Abbott Nutrition International - India, gave insight about the driving forces and challenges faced the Indian nutraceutical industry and the competencies and skill sets needed by medical advisors venturing into nutraceutical sector. Dr. Prashant Desai & Dr. Amit Garg Dr. Rohit Arora • Sharad Tyagi, Managing Director, Boehringer Ingelheim told the audience “What industry expects from the medical fraternity”. He said that Medical Affairs is the only function in a pharma company which can truly bridge the gaps between science and business. According to him, they are probably the only people who understand the “Why”, “What” and “How” of pharma business. • Finally Dr. Qayum Mukaddam summarized the take home messages for the delegates from the summit and gave them insight into career perspectives for medical advisors. INMAS 2014 was moderated by Anup Soans, Editor @ MedicinMan. Dr. Aju Abraham Varghese Anup Soans Editor - MedicinMan For further details: Log on to: http://inmas.org/ or write to admin@inmas.org Photo-essay continued on page 17. 6 | MedicinMan March 2014
  7. 7. E DIGITAL PHARMA Digital is changing the fundamentals of the marketplace. Here’s how pharma can keep pace. Chandan Kumar I ndian Pharma market is a red ocean with thousands of companies offering a plethora of me-too products. Their promotion also tends to be me-too as product mangers change companies frequently and implement the strategies of their previous company again and again. In this scenario, companies can gain the advantage of being first-movers in adopting digital technology to effectively differentiate their products and promotion. Digital technology has many advantages over paper-based static information systems. Doctors have also developed a fatigue to paper based visual aids. Promotions through videos, animations and multimedia demonstrations can offer more evidence in less time and make the promotion interactive. Virtual promotions though videos, podcasts, blogs can widen the scope of interaction and Chandan Kumar is working in healthcare publishing as an Acquisitions Editor. His area of Interest is Healthcare Marketing & Value Innovation. ckumar21@in.com http://www.linkedin.com/in/pharmtech @pharmacrat increase the time with doctors and engage patients as well. Virtual Intelligence Hand held devices have the potential to be virtual libraries accessible anywhere at the doctor’s convenience, instead of intruding into his productive time in the clinic. They can serve as an excellent support system in managing needs of patients. Some pharma companies are working on location based virtual services as 7 | MedicinMan March 2014 part of their digital marketing effort to give point of care services.
  8. 8. Chandan Kumar | Digital Pharma “ • Pfizer has developed a mobile app which helps patients with overactive bladder to locate nearby Digital technology is enabling companies to connect directly with patients using the patient’s location to provide details of nearby healthcare facilities and other important disease management information through virtual intelligence. ” restrooms. (Detrol LA and Toviaz are products for incontinence). • MSD has also developed an app for patients with allergy. Based on the user’s location, the app offers information on pollen counts and details of nearby physicians and pharmacy stores. (Product - Claritin) • Boehringer Ingelheim is steering a project in which phones and tablets can be paired with glucose meters to give instant alert/advice to diabetic patients through their phone/tablet. Thus, digital technology is enabling companies to connect directly with patients using the patient’s location to provide details of nearby healthcare facilities and other important disease management information through virtual intelligence. Social Media Social media has presented a new opportunity but the critical task is to introduce social media marketing in such a way that it benefits both company and patients without violating regulatory norms. Social media is a cost-effective platform for personalised interaction and collaboration with endusers like patients and patient groups. Most companies are still trying to understand the real potential of social media, but some have already initiated social media engagement programs. • J & J and Pfizer have launched YouTube channels and are considered as dynamic and responsive pharma companies on Facebook and Twitter. • Sanofi has also used YouTube to deliver information without mentioning product names; working within the guidelines. There is an acute shortage of professionals in Indian Pharma with the expertise to drive digital marketing. The need is to find and attract the right professionals who have a clear understanding of the digital world and the opportunities to create a new wave of digital pharma marketing. With over a billion people active in the digital world, virtual intelligence and social media will become more and more important to the pharma 8 | MedicinMan March 2014 industry’s marketing efforts.
  9. 9. MEDICINMAN EMPOWER YOUR FIELD FORCE Learning and Development Programs from the Leaders in Pharma Field Force Excellence Pharma-specific Training: Medical Representatives Field Sales Managers Senior Managers Signature Programs for Medical Representatives KA$H=CASH KNOWLEDGE  ATTITUDES  SKILLS  HABITS Constructed on the fundamental premise that a Medical Representative’s success depends on his Knowledge, Attitudes, Skills and Habits (KA$H). Representatives seek success in their personal and professional lives but look for it in the wrong places leaving them frustrated. Companies and bottom-lines suffer when the front-line is not fully engaged. KA$H=CASH is a high-engagement module for customer-facing employees. REPEAT Rx Repeat Rx is an advanced module for customer-facing Representatives based on the book by Anup Soans. Repeat Rx focuses on building lasting relationships with Doctors by creating value through a process of Calling Connecting Consulting Collaborating with the Doctor. At each stage of this Four Stage process the Representative acquires measurable skills and competencies that enable him to add value in the Doctor’s chamber. Repeat Rx comes with detailed evaluation tools. In Any Profession, More KA$H = More Cash
  10. 10. anupsoans@gmail.com | +91-934-2232-949 | www.medicinman.net Signature Programs for Front-line Managers SuperVision for the SuperWiser Front-line Manager. Based on the best-selling book by Anup Soans, this program is for new and experienced Front-line Managers who would like to get breakthrough performance from their teams. SuperVision for the SuperWiser Front-line Manager focuses on topics such as Team Building, Emotional Intelligence, Situational Leadership, Coaching and more. VALUE ADD: Psychometric Assessment* Signature Programs for Second-line and Senior Managers THE HALF-TIME COACH The Half-Time Coach is based on the concept of half-time in football. If half-time is so crucial in a game that last only 90 minutes, how much more important in a career that last a life time. The Half-Time Coach is a learning-by-reflection program with a focus on Coaching Skills for senior managers. Modules also cover Self Awareness, Emotional Intelligence, Employee Engagement and Sales Change Management. VALUE ADD: Psychometric Assessment* WHY SHOULD ANYONE FOLLOW YOU? A walk-the-talk program for cross-functional senior managers to understand the process of employee engagement, creating trust and building relationships to build and sustain high-performance teams. VALUE ADD: Psychometric Assessment* *Psychometrics assessments give in-depth insights into one’s personality preferences and its impact on interpersonal relationships and teamwork.
  11. 11. anupsoans@gmail.com | +91-934-2232-949 | www.medicinman.net Webinars and E-Learning Company’s may choose to deliver a program as a webinar - giving the advantage of scale and lowering costs. iSharpenM My Success is My Responsibiliti Audiences are kept engaged using visually stimulating slides and powerful delivery. Emphasis is placed on taking charge of one’s success, even in the absence of oversight. Most recently 1,000 reps of a leading MNC were trained over four webinars with excellent feedback. Customized issues of MedicinMan, with inputs from the company can be given to the Field Force for their continuous learning and development. MedicinMan currently reaches 60,000 pharma professionals. Methodology All programs are fully customizable. A pre-program questionnaire is used to capture the needs and expectations of the participants. Company’s may request a demonstration of a particular module at no expense (except conveyance to venue). Programs incorporate the principles of adult learning and are highly participative, audio-visual and activity-based. Important truths are conveyed through games, stories and videos. Companies are advised to give participants the books on which the programs are based for continued learning and development. The same may be procured from the author at a discount. Management Games Audio/Visual Interactive Classroom Training Simulation Learning-by-reflection Case Studies
  12. 12. E Book Extract SELLING ACROSS CULTURES A new book by Renie McClay published by ASTD Press is apt for the global executive with a local vision. “The Art of Modern Sales Management” has 12 chapters, each written by a leader in the field from around the world. Below is an extract from the chapter contributed by Anup Soans and Joshua Soans. Download a free chapter of the book here. I n 1991, when India opened up its markets to the world economy, a billion people joined the global market. They were made up of over 2,000 ethnicities, 1,576 “mother tongues”, 8 [major] religions, and thousands of local dietary and religious practices. Multinationals entering the Indian market would have to successfully navigate this cultural jungle to survive and thrive. The fact that McDonald’s, the world’s largest seller of beef products, has a thriving business in India, the land of the sacred cow, is proof that cultural differences are Renie McClay, MA, CPLP, has been a dynamic performance improvement professional for 20 years. She has been successful in sales, management, and learning and performance roles at several Fortune 500 companies (Kraft, Pactiv, and Novartis). Founder of Inspired Learning LLC, she continues to bring her passion and practical approach to all project work. Inspired Learning LLC does design and delivery of energetic programs and projects around the world. only a barrier when a company fails in its due diligence. McDonald’s has a strict “no-beef, no-pork” policy in India since the cow is widely worshiped by Hindus and consumption of pork is forbidden in Islam. Instead the fast-food chain has a variety of vegetarian and chicken dishes in local flavors and is considered to be just as ‘Indian’ by urbanites as is curry and naan. Because of its cultural astuteness the world over, McDonald’s has become the poster boy for ‘glocalization’ – the art of being global in character but local in spirit. -AS JS Purchase the book on ASTD to read the complete chapter. 12 | MedicinMan March 2014
  13. 13. W100/FIELD FORCE PRODUCTIVITY TOOLS NOW AT ONLY INR 100*. MRP Rs. 799/- MRP Rs. 599/- *Exclusive corporate offer. Contact anupsoans@gmail.com | +91-93422-32949 for more details.
  14. 14. E WHAT YOU MEASURE, IS WHAT GETS DONE! Performance metrics are often a trade-off between ease and value. Is “calls-per-day” a meaningless metric that needs immediate replacement? “ If you measure number of calls per day of your field force, your field force will deliver calls per day and little else. ” Hanno Wolfram I n Harvard Business Review and a number of pharmaceutical companies, discussions around KPIs currently appear to be hot. Evidence arises that sales, market share and calls per day are measures of the past and becoming more and more obsolete. For example, if you measure speed you need two metrics: distance and time. William Hewlett is said to be the originator of the statement: “You only can manage what you measure”. The subsequent addition “… what you measure gets done” is more common sense than a pearl of wisdom. Human beings act on what can be measured: setting your car’s display to average speed or fuel consumption will make a big difference to the way you drive. Your behaviour while driving will change by the measure you choose. It might be worth a try! It works the same way in business: if you have punch clocks in your offices or factories, time in the premises will be measured. Metrics will be “in/out” time. Employees will be in and out as measured and required. If you measure number of calls per day of your field force, your field force will deliver calls per day and little else. Hanno Wolfram is Managing Director at Innov8 GmbH, Germany. Write to Hanno: hanno@innov8.de 14 | MedicinMan March 2014 The tragedy of outdated measures is very evident when in Asia many calls of medical representatives merely last 20 seconds - in Europe they call it “spot-calls” - and in www.cafepharma. com you can read about “drive-by calls” and “inflated numbers” of calls reported. It is not really surprising that the reduction in field force headcount often does not harm pharma’s top-line. In pharma tradition such calls are part of KPIs. In many cases KPIs suffer from two things: the undefined word “performance”, standing for something different in every one’s understanding and the neglect of the original intention of Key Performance Indicators:
  15. 15. Hanno Wolfram | What You Measure, Is What Gets Done! “ “Everyone in the organization pulls the same rope at the same end into the same direction.” Any metric or measure must be manageable. Jason Jordan wrote in HBR (Jan. 2014): “As much as sales managers talk about “managing revenue” or “managing market share”, Business Results are ultimately unmanageable.”” ” Usually there are two categories or sets of metrics: 1. Input or effort and 2. Outcome or result. Central questions are: 1. If you measure field-force activities or results why not call them measures of activities or results? The only alternative is to define, share and make sure that everyone understands identically what “performance” means in your company. 2. Whatever you measure must fully match and support the company objective. If your objective is “client satisfaction”, you must measure it. Remember: Improvement of top or bottom line is the “raison d’être” of an enterprise and hardly a meaningful measure. 3. Any metric or measure must be manageable. Jason Jordan wrote in HBR (Jan. 2014): “As much as sales managers talk about “managing revenue” or “managing market share, but ” Business Results are ultimately unmanageable.” Measures or KPIs must be defined in support of the company objective and strategy. Novel thoughts and managerial action might already be overdue. -HW MISSING SOMETHING IMPORTANT? You can access all past issues of MedicinMan at: http://medicinman.net/archives. Be sure to SUBSCRIBE on our website (top-right corner: www.medicinman.net) to stay up-to-date with us. 15 | MedicinMan March 2014
  16. 16. E Treatment Compliance Survey among diabetic patients Rashmi Thosar Medicines don’t work if people don’t take them! And yet, medicines are neglected the most. Attitudes are contagious! They derive our behaviour towards what we do and thus is of significance even in understanding patient non-adherence to medication, especially in chronic diseases. Estimates of medication non-adherence rates typically range from 30% - 60%. With an estimated 50% non-adherence in chronic conditions, segmenting patients based on their attitudes is critical to evolving adherence models. Brandcare studies behaviors and attitudes of diabetics in India. Rashmi Thosar is CEO, Brandcare and a leading professional in healthcare communications and advertising in India; she has been at the helm of leadership at Brandcare and over the years and has been instrumental in its transformation to the top 5 healthcare agencies in India. Our Authors Abdul Basit Khan Dr. Shalini Ratan Ajay Kumar Dua Dr. Surinder Kumar Amlesh Ranjan Sharma Amrutha Bhavthankar Dr. Ulhas Ganu Andris A. Zoltners Geetha G H Anthony Lobo H. J. Badrinarayana Aparna Sharma Hakeem Adebiyi Arvind Nair Hanno Wolfram Atish Mukherjee Hitendra Kansal B. Ramanathan Iyer Gopalkrishna Chayya Sankath Jasvinder Singh Craig Dixon Banga Devanand Chenuri Javed Shaikh Venkat Jitendra Singh Dinesh Chindarkar John Gwillim Dr. Amit Dang Jolly Mathews Dr. Aniruddha Joshua Mensch Malpani K Hariram Dr. Hemant Mittal K. Satya Mahesh Dr. Neelesh Bhandari Ken Boyce Dr. S. Srinivasan Mahendra Rai Mala Raj Manoj Kumar Mayank Saigal Milan Sinha Mohan Lal Gupta Neelesh Bhandari Neha Ansa Nishkarsh Likhar Noumaan Qureshi Parveen Gandhi Pinaki Ghosh PK Sinha Prabhakar Shetty Vivek Hattangadi Rachana Narayan Rajesh Rangarajan Ralph Boyce Renie McClay Richa Goyel Richard Ilsley RM Saravanan Sagar S. Pawar Salil Kallianpur Salil Kallianpur Sally E. Lorimer Sandhya Pramanik Sanjay Munshi Shafaq Shaikh Shalini Ratan Sharad Virmani Shiv Bhasin Spring Sudhakar Subba Rao Chaganti Sudhakar Madhavan Tony O’Connor V. Srinivasan Varadharajan K. Vijaya Shetty Vishal V. Bhaiyya Vishal Verma Vivek Hattangadi William Fernandez MEDICINMAN invites contributions from Pharma professionals on topics related to Field Force Excellence. See: www.medicinman.net/author-guidelines for more information. 16 | MedicinMan March 2014
  17. 17. E BOOK REVIEW UNHEALTHY PRACTICES By Dr. Sumit Ghoshal; Notion Press Anup Soans Dr Sumit Ghoshal, a medical doctor and healthcare writer, weaves a colourful tapestry of his vast experience in his first fictional work – Unhealthy Practices. If you thought that only pharma executives had sales targets, Unhealthy Practices narrates the tremendous sales pressure that doctors in corporate hospitals have to endure to survive. The work pressure that young residents have to endure is no different from that of Medical Reps. Like many senior field sales managers, there is Dr. Naresh, who has given his best years to the hospital and is axed for not generating enough revenue. This pressure on revenue generation is what drives unethical practices both in pharma industry and hospitals. Patients of doctors who do not pull in enough revenue are denied a place in the hospital’s busy ICU. This interplay of necessity, job security, duty and ethics is woven into a fine story in which some doctors compromise and a few others struggle to find a fine balance between ethics, livelihood and Unhealthy Practices. Pharma executives will also appreciate the predicament of the busy pharma marketing executive, Harish whose hectic work-life renders his wife, Pratibha susceptible to alcohol, parties and finally the attention and advances of a neighbour. 17 | MedicinMan March 2014 Unhealthy Practices an excellent read and one of the few that I have read in a single sitting – a challenge in today’s digital world. Dr. Sumit Ghoshal has done a wonderful job of writing a human interest story that engages the reader throughout. Those of us who have been in the pharma industry and have worked in Mumbai may even end up speculating the identity of the hospital and doctors. Unhealthy Practices depicts the current scenario in Indian healthcare very accurately.
  18. 18. Anup Soans | Book Review: Unhealthy Practices by Sumit Ghoshal “ Pharma executives will also appreciate the predicament of the busy pharma marketing executive, Harish whose hectic work-life renders his wife, Pratibha susceptible to alcohol, parties and finally the attention and advances of a neighbour. ” 18 | MedicinMan March 2014 The reader can relate to the predicament of honest doctors and the compulsions of businessmen running hospitals in a city like Mumbai. There is plenty of excitement, thrill and suspense as the struggle for control of Gopalji Damji Hospital unfolds. Unhealthy Practices is a welcome trend and a must read by every healthcare professional. The language is simple and lucid and engages the reader without taxing them with difficult words. Unhealthy Practices reminded me of The Citadel, probably the finest work of medical fiction by another physician, A.J. Cronin in 1937. Although, the medical world has not changed much since 1937 in terms of ethical dilemmas of doctors, The Citadel has been credited with laying the foundation for the introduction of the NHS. Hopefully, Unhealthy Practices will also lead to discussion and action to make the Indian medical fraternity more transparent and accountable. Excerpts from Unhealthy Practices When the management of Gopalji Damji Hospital decides to compulsorily retire a number of its most senior doctors, no one expects the matter to snowball into a major public relations disaster. But this is precisely what happens. One of the trustees, Prashant Kadakia, leaks the story to a friendly newspaper reporter, whose own father had died in the same hospital just two months before. Meanwhile in the hospital, a tussle for control is going on. The employees demand a heavy bonus, which the trustees cannot afford. The employees threaten to go on strike. The adverse publicity continues until the board decides to replace the Medical Director. The trustee, Kadakia, opens another avenue with the help of some Indian friends living in the US. They infuse the necessary funds to get the hospital on its feet again but the real challenge is to overthrow the existing board of trustees and get the hospital going again. To succeed in this and to become chairman himself, Kadakia has to walk a tight rope, and douse a number of fires that threaten to cripple the institution forever. -AS
  19. 19. INMAS 2014 - Speakers, Audience and Organisers

×