                              
                              ...
Shakti Chakraborty emphasised the need to train Medical
Reps adequately and also equip the Medical Rep not just
with techn...
3 | MedicinMan June 2013
MedicinMan Volume 3 Issue 7 | July 2013
Editor and Publisher
Anup Soans
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1. Highlights of FFE 2013........................................5
A brief recap of MedicinMan an...
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                         
       ...
6 | MedicinMan July 2013
Highlights of FFE 2013 | Prof. Vivek Hattangadi
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Pharma Field Force Excellence Conference Special

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1. Highlights of FFE 2013 by Prof. Vivek Hattangadi

A brief recap of MedicinMan annual flagship event – FFE 2013, with a photo essay.

2. Crystal Gazing into Pharma by Amlesh Ranjan

A look at the trends likely to shape the Indian pharma industry in the coming years.

3. Coaches, Not Bosses by K. Hariram

Managers, both second-line and first-line, have a responsibility to coach their teams and not merely set targets and look the other way.

4. Marketing and the Art of War by Vivek Hattangadi

Pharma marketing is like warfare. How to adapt and succeed.

5. Digital Dose: Best Indian Pharma Blogs - MedicinMan

Featuring “Apothecurry” and “Building Pharma Brands”

6. Preference Measurement in Economic Analysis in Healthcare by Shafaq Shaikh and Javed Shaikh

Direct and indirect methods of assigning weights or ascertaining preferences for different states of health.

Published in: Business, News & Politics
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Pharma Field Force Excellence Conference Special

  1. 1.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        å                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          MEDICINMANField Force Excellence TM July 2013 | www.medicinman.net MEDICAL REP IS KEY TO THE PHARMA BUSINESS FFE 2013was another occasion to showcase the talent of people who have made Indian Pharma a legend. The faculty and audience were packed with senior professionals with significant achievement to their credit. The keynote address was delivered by Shakti Chakraborty, president of Lupin, a battle scarred veteran who has risen from the ranks of field force. True to his name, Shakti Chakraborty delivered a powerful but simple message – get your basics right, know where you are before setting ambitious growth targets. Shakti Chakraborty was generous in his praise of Mankind Pharma for getting a single ingredient – that is: commitment from field force right. He also talked of the need for senior man- agement to identify the obstacles faced by Medical Reps and remove those obstacles, this alone was the right way to face the challenges and create opportu- nities for the Medical Rep to perform. EDITORIAL
  2. 2. Shakti Chakraborty emphasised the need to train Medical Reps adequately and also equip the Medical Rep not just with technical information but with the required emotion- al resilience to face the hardships in the marketplace. Most Medical Reps quit because their training only equips them with detailing skills and not with realistic picture of the marketplace. Shakti Chakraborty also emphasised the need for set- ting realistic sales targets. The key point of Shakti Chakraborty’s keynote address was to reduce the man- agement layers that do not serve any useful purpose other than putting pressure on Medical Reps – instead compa- nies should increase the remuneration of Medical Reps and FLMs and raise their social esteem. Shakti Chakraborty clearly highlighted the fact that in the present commoditized market scenario, the only emo- tional connect or bonding with brand was through the Medical Rep and yet very few companies and managers took this into consideration. The job of marketing accord- ing to Shakti Chakraborty was to make the work and life of Medical Reps more interesting and exciting instead of cramming several pages into the Visual Aid making it impractical and boring. Shakti Chakraborty showed facts and figures from Cege- dim, which clearly showed that while all companies were failing to get adequate ROI on in-clinic investments, only Mankind had a 16% higher in-clinic persuasion factor Vs 1% of other top three companies in cardiology. What made the Mankind field force so effective? It was certainly not competence but their character of sincerity and com- mitment to make 15 plus effective calls on a daily basis. He concluded by exhorting pharma leaders to rethink their approach to field force productivity in the light of current market realities and empower the Medical Rep to be more effective in front of the doctor - in the one to three minutes that is available. Clearly, Indian Pharma needs more leaders like Shakti Chakraborty, who have not only risen from the ranks but continue to maintain their touch with the field realties as experienced by Medical Reps. -MM                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        Editorial: Medical Rep is the Key to Pharma Business | Anup Soans
  3. 3. 3 | MedicinMan June 2013 MedicinMan Volume 3 Issue 7 | July 2013 Editor and Publisher Anup Soans CEO Chhaya Sankath COO Arvind Nair Chief Mentor K. Hariram Advisory Board Prof. Vivek Hattangadi; Jolly Mathews Editorial Board Salil Kallianpur; Dr. Shalini Ratan; Shashin Bodawala; Prabhakar Shetty; Vardarajan S; Dr. Mandar Kubal; Dr. Surinder Kumar International Editorial Board Hanno Wolfram; Renie McClay Executive Editor Joshua Soans MedicinMan Academy: Prof. Vivek Hattangaadi, Dean, Professional Skills Development Letters to the Editor: anupsoans@medicinman.net (L) Chhaya Sankath - CEO, MedicinMan; (C) Arvind Nair - COO, MedicinMan speak to a delegate prior to the start of FFE 2013. BEHIND-THE-SCENES WITH TEAM MEDICINMAN AT FFE 2013 (L) Shakti Chakraborty - Group President, Lupin (C) Arvind Nair, COO - MedicinMan and (R) Anup Soans - Editor, MedicinMan. (L) Chhaya Sankath - CEO, MedicinMan felicitating Ameesh Masurekar - Founder CEO, Pharmasofttech AWACS, sponsor FFE 2013.
  4. 4. 4 | MedicinMan June 2013 1. Highlights of FFE 2013........................................5 A brief recap of MedicinMan annual flagship event - FFE 2013, with a photo essay. Prof. Vivek Hattangadi 2. Crystal Gazing into Pharma................................9 A look at the trends likely to shape the Indian pharma industry in the coming years. Amlesh Ranjan 3. Coaches, Not Bosses.........................................13 Managers, both second-line and first-line, have a responsibility to coach their teams and not merely set targets and look the other way. K. Hariram 4. Marketing and the Art of War..........................19 Pharma marketing is like warfare. How to adapt and succeed. Vivek Hattangadi 5. Digital Dose: Best Indian Pharma Blogs.........21 Featuring “Apothecurry” and “Building Pharma Brands” MedicinMan 6. Preference Measurement in Economic Analysis in Healthcare...........................................22 Direct and indirect methods of assigning weights or ascertaining preferences for different states of health. Shafaq Shaikh and Javed Shaikh LEADERSHIP IN ACTION WITH MARSHALL GOLDSMITH Where: Hyatt Regency, Mumbai When: 15th July 2013 Details on Page 25. CONTENTS (Click to navigate)
  5. 5. E                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          å                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               å                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         5 | MedicinMan July 2013 HIGHLIGHTS FFE 20135 x 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50 55 60 y Date: Saturday, 8th June 2013 Theme:FieldForceProductivity Place: Courtyard Marriott, Mumbai FFE 2013 was hosted by MedicinMan at the Courtyard Marriott, Mumbai on June 8, 2013 FFE 2013 began with a Breakfast Brainstorm with CEOs Registrations: over 70 senior pharma professionals attended Prof. Vivek Hattangadi is a Consultant in Pharma Brand Management and Sales Training at The Enablers. He is a visiting faculty at CIPM Calcutta (Vidyasagar University) for their MBA course in Pharmaceutical Management. Prof. Hattangadi is on the MedicinMan Advisory Board. vivekhattangadi@theenablers.org
  6. 6. 6 | MedicinMan July 2013 Highlights of FFE 2013 | Prof. Vivek Hattangadi B uilding an effective field force in pharma today can be a very challenging task. “What are the barriers to Field Force Effectiveness (FFE)?” and “How can these barriers be overcome?” were the questions asked and discussed in a very creative and interesting way at ‘FFE 2013 - Field Force Productivity: Opportunities and Challenges’, organized by Medicin- Man at Hotel Courtyard Marriott, Mumbai on Satur- day, 8th June 2013. Getting access to the doctors is getting tougher, making it difficult for medical representatives to meet demanding expectations. Negative public opinion about medical representatives is a real challenge for the industry. This puts sales force effectiveness on centre stage for pharmaceutical companies. Who could be more competent to dwell on this sub- ject then those who have risen from the position of medical representatives to become CEOs and Manag- ing Directors? Mr. Shakti Chakraborty (Group Pres- ident, Lupin), Dr. Ganesh Nayak (COO & Executive Director, Zydus) and Mr. Hariram Krishnan (ex-Man- aging Director, Galderma) were amongst the galaxy of speakers and panelists at ‘FFE 2013’. Mr. Shakti Chakraborty kick-started the day’s proceedings with a thought-provoking examination of the importance of the human component in the pharma sales and marketing business process! He spoke about the ‘human side’ of strategy. The basic work of strategy implementation - at least the ‘human side’ of strategy implementation - is knowable. The most common reason why a strategy fails is because people at the grass-root level lack clarity about how a strategy can benefit them at the work place and how it can help them achieve the organization’s objectives. A failed implementation can be catastrophic, he added. At the ‘CEO Roundtable’ which followed (panel members: Bhaskar Iyer - Abbott, Dr. Ganesh Nay- ak - Zydus Cadilla, Mr. Shakti Chakraborty - Lupin and Sujay Shetty - PwC), an insightful remark was made: “Today, the field force is neither interested in the carrots nor is it afraid of sticks”. This set the pace for discussions on challenges to making the Indian pharmaceutical industry a great place for people to begin and build a career. The role of Field Force Automation (FFA) was dis- cussed. The consensus was that FFA did not address effectiveness and productivity although it increases efficiency. It is only the competence and commitment of the medical representative which will result in pro- ductivity through effective sales calls, especially as the doctor is often ‘psychologically sick’ from his practice when he meets the medical representative. Keynote Address: Shakti Chakraborty, Group President, Lupin, emphasizing the ‘human side’ of sales and marketing strategy. Welcome Address: Anup Soans, Editor MedicinMan, welcomes the distinguished audience and introduces the agenda. CEO Roundtable (L-R): Shakti Chakraborty, Group President, Lupin, Ganesh Nayak, COO & Executive Director, Zydus Cadilla, Bhaskar Iyer, Head of India Commercial Operations, Abbott, Sujay Shetty, Partner & Lead, Pharma & Life Sciences, PwC.
  7. 7. 7 | MedicinMan July 2013 Highlights of FFE 2013 | Prof. Vivek Hattangadi Business Intelligence Panel (L-R): Ameesh Masurekar, Founder Director - AIOCD Pharmasofttech AWACS, Dr. Viraj Suvarna, Medical Director, Boehringer Ingelheim, Salil Kallianpur, Commercial Head - Classic Brands Center of Excellence, GSK. Employee Engagement Panel (L-R): K. Hariram, Former MD (retd.), Galderma India, Amlesh Ranjan, Associate Director, Sanofi, Deep Bhandari, Director, Marketing and Sales Excellence, UCB, Mohan Sheshadri, GM & Head, Training & Development, Ranbaxy, Anup Soans, Editor MedicinMan. K. Hariram, Former MD (retd.), Galderma India, on ‘Role Clarity for Field Sales Managers to Enhance Field Force Productivity.’ Amlesh Ranjan, Associate Director, Sanofi, on ‘Pharmodelling for Healthcare: KAM & Market Access.’ Effective sales call, therefore, is the foundation of sales productivity. It is very important to get the doctor emotionally involved not only with the brand but also with the medical representative. The take-home message from this Roundtable: ‘Field Force Effectiveness is the key differentiator for performance management. Field Force Effectiveness will ultimately drive profitability’. The ‘CEO Roundtable’ was followed by a panel discussion on ‘Business Intelligence for Field Force Productivity’. Busi- ness Intelligence helps an organization to get quick and precise information to plan strategies and win over com- petition. Without business and competitive intelligence, it would be difficult to identify and develop new opportu- nities. Mr. Ameesh Masurekar (of AWACS) talked about the use of new technologies, processes and applications to analyze internal and external data, disseminate informa- tion and present it appropriately. This session was followed by a passionate panel discus- sion on ‘Employee Engagement: The New Paradigm in Field Force Productivity’. What is employee engagement? Anup Soans defined it as – “Maximum job contribution and maximum job satisfaction”. Employee engagement means profits to the company. Disengaged employees spread negativity. They harm the organization, because they affect productivity, the morale of people around and ultimately the profits. Mr. Hariram cautioned the audience that the pharma in- dustry is getting, and will continue to get, only ordinary people, mainly migrants from Tier II and Tier III towns. In the light of this, increasing employee engagement will contribute to Field Force Effectiveness. Dwelling on the strengths of people and putting their strengths to work will further enhance employee engagement. Next was a session on ‘PharModeling for Healthcare: KAM & Market Access’ where Mr. Amlesh Ranjan talked about the future trends in the Indian pharma industry where public healthcare spending will dominate private or personal spending. Key Account Management will therefore have a new dimension. Marketers will have to articulate compelling value proposition across stakehold- ers all along the product life cycle. Mr. Hariram later made a very interesting presentation on the ‘Role Clarity for Field Sales Managers to Enhance Field Force Productivity’. Role clarity offers focus, he said. He talked about responsibility, relationship, and the areas of contribution (i.e. coaching for performance). The inverted pyramid organization structure was a very interesting concept he discussed. He places the custom- ers at the top, followed by the revenue generation team whereas the person giving directions to the whole orga- nization [MD/CEO] is at the bottom is very pertinent in today’s scenario where people, especially the medical representatives, look for emotional protection. -VH Audience Questions: Sai Kumari, Head - Global Training, Himalaya Drug Company, puts a pointed question across to the CEOs.
  8. 8. Hosted by www.MedicinMan.net. Organized by Knowledge Media Venturz. FFE & BRAND DRIFT 2014 ADVANCE ANNOUNCEMENT: Encouraged by the overwhelming response for Brand Drift and FFE 2013, we are happy to announce the following: 1. Brand Drift and FFE will be held on consecutive days in 2014. 2. Tentative Dates: First or Second week of February 2014. 3. Pharma Service Providers are invited to partner with us for this event. 2014 Your Message HERE at FFE & Brand Drift 2014 CONTACT arvind@kmv.co.in | +91-987-0201-422
  9. 9. E 9 | MedicinMan July 2013 CRYSTAL GAZING PHARMA. The trends likely to shape the pharma sales and marketing mix in India in the years to come. H ealthcare is first a responsibility and then only an opportunity for pharma. Let us look at the industry from pharma marketing perspective, which has a great role to play in fulfilling the responsibility and optimizing the opportunity. “Lifebuoy se haath dhoye kya?” Lifebuoy put this sentence on all the rotis, which got served at the recent Mahakumbh mela. Keeping in mind the importance of hand hygiene for health, this was a great example of optimizing opportunity while fulfilling responsibility. It is not a surprise that the foremost management guru, Peter Drucker said, “Marketing is not a func- tion, it is the whole business seen from the customer’s point of view”. Pharma, in India, has been progressing through the decades with very aggressive portfolio and sales force expansion but the industry environment has been INTO Amlesh Ranjan is Associate Director at Sanofi. The views expressed here are personal.
  10. 10. “ Crystal Gazing into Pharma | Amlesh Ranjan 10|MedicinManJuly2013 changing in a big way. Newer stakeholders in the healthcare delivery space have been gaining ground. The landscape is stormy with network of influencers – providers, payers, regu- lators – making their impact. But as Vivian Greene said, “Life is not about waiting for the storms to pass… it’s about learning to dance in the rain”. And rightly so because increasing health insurance and public funding of healthcare is fuelling growth. Healthcare infrastructure investment and expansion augurs well for future. Household healthcare spend will keep growing through the years. Medical tourism will increase in coverage – geographically and in therapy areas. Private hospitals will continue their rapid expansion and improved reach and will also keep evolving from current critical care to chronic and primary care. Lifestyle related interventions, niche therapies and disease management will keep on gaining. All this will make our healthcare move from being ‘out of pocket’ to be- coming ‘partly reimbursed’ and finally a ‘majorly reimbursed’ market. With the above in mind, pharma growth agenda will have to address the present and emerging opportunities – áá Opportunities in geography: Driven by growing urbanization, metro and tier-I towns will continue to be significant drivers of growth. áá Opportunities in Economy: Disposable incomes set to rise significantly in rural areas. áá Opportunities in Life Cycle Management: Pro-active approach towards building brand portfolio and aug- menting the same as you progress through the life cycle. áá Opportunities across specialty: Targeting GPs, Physi- cians and Specialists. áá Opportunities in adherence: Medication compliance has great impact on health outcomes. áá Opportunities in Digital Ecosystem: Increasing number of Doctors and Patients are exploring social media for healthcare. Let us have a look at the possible roadmap for a sustainable growth for Pharma - áá Multi-segment approach: different indications; across sectors - clinicians, hospitals, health systems; various specialities; diverse tiers of geography. áá Collaborative marketing: evolving from transactional to relationship-based to finally a collaborative mode of marketing strategy and operation. áá Multi-level approach in marketing: share of voice with prescribers, partnership with providers and participation with payers. Household healthcare spend will keep growing through the years. Medical tourism will increase in coverage – geographically and in therapy areas. Private hospitals will continue their rapid expansion and improved reach and will also keep evolving from current critical care to chronic and primary care. Lifestyle related interventions, niche therapies and disease management will keep gaining. ”
  11. 11. “ Crystal Gazing into Pharma | Amlesh Ranjan 11 | MedicinMan July 2013 Physician-centric approach needs to transform into health- care systems involvement. Co-creation of value, through healthcare network orientation, is the possible answer where dialogue, access, risk-benefit and transparency are the key elements. Co-creation approach can result in the desired outcomes of Choice, Trust, Community and Inno- vation which will benefit all involved and impacted. All-round effectiveness is a critical need of the hour which at organizational level, manifests through Strategy, Cul- ture and Infrastructure and at individual level – Knowl- edge, Attitude and Skills. Commercial Excellence is a key imperative which can be achieved by efficient integration of customer focus and growth strategy. Go-to-market strategy needs to flow seamlessly into sales and marketing. Sales Model Excellence can be attained by creating hybrid model of sales force structure which can address varying customer size and complexity. This will facilitate ‘reach and penetration’ with portfolio and geography match with focused BU and sales model supported by appropriate channel structure. Sales Force Optimization can be aimed at by 6 critical elements - resource optimization, segmentation and target- ing, incentives and rewards, training and capabilities, sales force planning and measurement. Key Account Management team will be very important to harness the healthcare opportunity where the organization needs to aim for achieving ‘relationship progression’, from being ‘standard supplier’ to becoming ‘strategic partner’ for the accounts. Social Media Engagement will be critical for transparency, trust-building and patient empowerment. The multi-chan- nel approach will facilitate two-way and multi-point com- munication to achieve above. And we are clearly into an an era of partnerships which will thrive on ‘co-petition’ and not competition. So joining hands together is not a one time, one issue strategy, it should be a norm, now. Pharma will keep thriving with a ‘healthcare approach’ fuelled by ‘multi-level marketing’ and driven by ‘all-round effectiveness’. -AR All-round effectiveness is a critical need of the hour which at organizational level, manifests through Strategy, Culture & Infrastructure and at individual level – Knowledge, Attitude and Skills. we are clearly into an an era of partnerships which will thrive on ‘co-petition’ and not competition. So joining hands together is not a one time, one issue strategy, it should be a norm, now. ”
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  13. 13. I n the last few weeks I have been in and out of quite a few FFE/SFE forums that focused on FLMs as the key linkers and multipliers of sales people and organizational strategy. In every interac- tion or a presentation there was much emphasis on FLMs being the weakest link and that there was an urgent need for FLMs to be trained and developed. The FLM ‘ought to’ should not become mere rhetoric in every forum. So the question is who will do the training and development of the FLMs? Obviously, it has to be the SLMs (second line man- agers). While training can be given at a class room level, on-the-job learning is what makes a difference. Just like the FLMs are missing the opportunity to coach their MRs, similarly the SLMs are losing/miss- ing the opportunity to coach FLMs. May be the SLMs are also not being coached by their Sales Manager/ Director/VP. So, the coaching culture is missing in the whole hierarchy and for that matter in the whole organiza- tion. The blame cannot be put on FLMs alone. The organizational culture has to change and the coach- ing culture has to be fostered at all levels. E COACHES, NOT BOSSES. K. Hariram is the former MD (retd.) at Galderma India. He is Chief Mentor at MedicinMan and a regular contributor. khariram25@yahoo.com “Just like the FLMs are missing the opportunity to coach their MRs, similarly the SLMs are losing/missing the opportunity to coach FLMs. May be the SLMs are also not being coached by their Sales Manager/Director/VP. So, the coaching culture is missing in the whole hierarchy and for that matter in the whole organization. Second-line Managers (SLMs) need to coach FLMs to be coaches themselves. When managers realize their roles as coaches the organization stands to reap rich dividends. ” E
  14. 14. 14 | MedicinMan July 2013 Coaches, Not Bosses | K. Hariram “ HAVING SAID THIS LET US TAKE A CLOSE LOOK AT FLMS AND THEIR SLMS – the Manager of Managers. These managers of managers (SLM) must select, train, and hold front-line managers accountable. Alas, many SLMs ne- glect this fundamental aspect of their job; they do not coach or teach management skills to their first time managers. Rather, they ignore all warning symptoms and signs and just let their managers “sink or swim.” This poor leadership weakens the line management as many first-time managers develop shocking managerial skills and styles. Further, it is a drain on organizational resource as promising sales people progress into management, only to dilute themselves without adequate guidance, and then leave with their career in dumps or contribute to increasing attri- tion. WHAT SHOULD BE THE REQUIRED SKILLS OF SLMS ? 1. Focus on the right choice of FLMs. Choosing the right people to become managers with all the potential for manage- rial function and not just ‘super sales people’. 2. Train them. More importantly, teaching managerial skills to first time managers. In addition, the SLMs need to support and encourage their FLMs while holding them accountable for their work and also the productivity of their team. 3. Build and manage relationships across the team of FLMs. This includes allocating resources (money, time, attention, people) across the team of FLMs. It is very important to avoid any barriers across the team of FLMs. Simplifying work wherever possible is a good way of adding to the positive team environment. OF COURSE THERE ARE CHALLENGES FOR THE SLM (Managers of Managers) The key challenge for the SLM is to evaluate their FLMs’ per- formance without diluting their authority. They need to know and be aware of, how their managers are really managing. Are their FLMs getting results while managing and leading in the proper way? Or are they so focused on results that they have adopted that they care less for their team members (a “kiss up but kick down”) leadership style? SLMS NEED TO ASK: 1. Are the FLMs available and approachable? Monitor and observe closely. 2. Do they move around with a purpose? Are they in the right place at the right time? This will help the SLM to coach the team members. Caution should be taken to avoid solving all problems directly. Problem-solving should be left to the direct FLM as a part of his responsibility. At best the SLM could use the opportunity to coach his FLM on problem-solv- ing skills. The key challenge for the SLM is to evaluate their FLMs’ performance without diluting their authority. They need to know and be aware of how their managers are really managing. Are their FLMs getting results while managing and leading in the proper way? Or are they so focused on results that they care less for their team members (a “kiss up but kick down”) leadership style?
  15. 15. “ 15 | MedicinMan July 2013 3. Are you reviewing the daily activities of your FLMs? On what do your FLMs spend time on? Are they focused on their own work or on the work of their team? Do they allo- cate sufficient time for their administrative tasks (reports, efforts area, KOL meetings, etc) and managerial tasks such as following-up, coaching, supporting, and training? EARLY WARNING SIGNS OF ROLE MALFUNCTION- ING. If SLMs are monitoring regularly, they can catch the early warning signals that indicate that either they or their FLMs are going off the track. For FLMs: 1. Working alone often (in pharma lingo - ‘individual work’). Very often doing individual work or continuing to do the tasks that they most enjoyed in their earlier role. 2. Managing things directly. They do everything on their own including detailing in every call, taking orders etc. For SLMs: 3. Inability to delegate. They may have difficulty delegat- ing and letting the FLMs solve their own problems. FLMs must be able to give their views and solve their own team’s problems. No development takes place if the SLM is solving every problem or making every decision. 4. Absence of any timely feedback. SLMs give little or no feedback to their FLMs. There is little focus on performance management (reviews and periodic assessments). 5. No effort by the SLMs to build a strong and diverse team of FLMs. Keeping a set of weak FLMs or building a group of managers that are all clones in personality, exper- tise and leadership style. The team should be diverse with various strengths and expertise. 6. ‘Us’ vs. ‘them’ mentality. Pitching against each other or people in the rest of the organization. (Even ‘Us’ vs ‘Market- ing/distribution’ etc). 7. Lots of ego. Like in any other leadership role one has to have an attitude and value shift. It is no longer about the SLM or FLM as an individual performer (“I”); it is about the long-term success of the team of managers and the team that the manager of managers (SLM) builds (“we”). Every organization requires strong front-line managers and leaders. The job of developing these managers becomes the direct responsibility of their direct managers, the SLM, who are “managers of managers.” It is not what happens in the 3 days of FLM’s joint work- ing that is important. It is what happens the rest of 27 days based on what the FLM has coached or trained during the 3 days of joint work that becomes important. -KH FLMs must be able to give their views and solve their own team’s problems. No development takes place if the SLM is solving every problem or making every decision. Coaches, Not Bosses | K. Hariram
  16. 16. EMPOWER YOUR FIELD FORCE KA$H=CASH REPEAT Rx Pharma-specific Training: Medical Representatives Field Sales Managers Senior Managers Learning and Development Programs from the Leaders in Pharma Field Force Excellence Signature Programs for Medical Representatives Constructed on the fundamental premise that a Medical Representative’s success depends on his Knowledge, Attitudes, Skills and Habits (KA$H). Representatives seek success in their personal and professional lives but look for it in the wrong places leaving them frustrated. Companies and bottom-lines suffer when the front-line is not ful- ly engaged. KA$H=CASH is a high-engagement module for customer-facing employees. Repeat Rx is an advanced module for customer-facing Representatives based on the book by Anup Soans. Repeat Rx focuses on building lasting relationships with Doctors by creating value through a process of Calling Connecting Consulting Collaborating with the Doctor. At each stage of this Four Stage process the Represen- tative acquires measurable skills and competencies that enable him to add value in the Doctor’s chamber. Repeat Rx comes with detailed evaluation tools. In Any Profession, More KA$H = More Cash KNOWLEDGE  ATTITUDES  SKILLS  HABITS MEDICINMAN
  17. 17. SuperVision for the SuperWiser Front-line Manager. WHY SHOULD ANY- ONE FOLLOW YOU? THE HALF-TIME COACH anupsoans@gmail.com | +91-934-2232-949 | www.medicinman.net Signature Programs for Front-line Managers Signature Programs for Second-line and Senior Managers Based on the best-selling book by Anup Soans, this program is for new and experienced Front-line Managers who would like to get breakthrough performance from their teams. SuperVision for the SuperWiser Front-line Manager focus- es on topics such as Team Building, Emotional Intelligence, Situational Leadership, Coaching and more. VALUE ADD: Psychometric Assessment* The Half-Time Coach is based on the concept of half-time in football. If half-time is so crucial in a game that last only 90 minutes, how much more important in a career that last a life time. The Half-Time Coach is a learning-by-reflection program with a focus on Coaching Skills for senior managers. Mod- ules also cover Self Awareness, Emotional Intelligence, Em- ployee Engagement and Sales Change Management. VALUE ADD: Psychometric Assessment* A walk-the-talk program for cross-functional senior managers to understand the process of employee engagement, creating trust and building relation- ships to build and sustain high-performance teams. VALUE ADD: Psychometric Assessment* *Psychometrics assessments give in-depth insights into one’s personality preferences and its impact on interpersonal relationships and teamwork.
  18. 18. anupsoans@gmail.com | +91-934-2232-949 | www.medicinman.net Methodology Webinars and E-Learning All programs are fully customizable. A pre-program questionnaire is used to capture the needs and expectations of the participants. Company’s may request a demonstration of a particular module at no expense (except conveyance to venue). Programs incorporate the principles of adult learning and are highly participative, audio-vi- sual and activity-based. Important truths are conveyed through games, stories and videos. Companies are advised to give participants the books on which the programs are based for continued learning and development. The same may be procured from the author at a discount. Company’s may choose to deliver a program as a webi- nar - giving the advantage of scale and lowering costs. Audiences are kept engaged using visually stimulating slides and powerful delivery. Emphasis is placed on taking charge of one’s success, even in the absence of oversight. Most recently 1,000 reps of a leading MNC were trained over four webinars with excellent feedback. Customized issues of MedicinMan, with inputs from the company can be given to the Field Force for their continuous learning and development. MedicinMan currently reaches 60,000 pharma professionals. Interactive Classroom Training Management Games Audio/Visual Learning-by-reflectionSimulation Case Studies iSharpenMMy Success is My Responsibiliti
  19. 19. I wanted to join the armed forces and even cleared the NDA written exams in 1966! But parental resistance, particularly from my mother, shattered my dreams and I landed up be- coming a medical representative! To my astonishment, I realized thatthereisalotofsimilaritybetweenmarketingwarfare(fought by foot soldiers called medical representatives) and military war- fare. It is intriguing that many day-today expressions in modern marketing come from the military lexicon, showing common- alities between actual military warfare and marketing warfare. Sun Tzu was an ancient Chinese military general, strategist, phi- losopher and perhaps one of the forefathers of contemporary strategic thinking. His book ‘Art of War’.1 is tracked by pharma marketers even today. They have applied many principles from this book while building marketing and sales strategies. Readers would be fascinated to know that some common terms in Indian pharma marketing have evolved from the military phraseology coined by Sun Tzu! 法 To start with,‘STRATEGY’comes from the Greek word– stratē- gia meaning ‘the art of a general’. Strategy means a high level plan to achieve one or more goals under conditions of uncer- tainty. Strategy is the science of combining and employing the means of war in planning and directing large military move- ments and operations. It is a plan, method, or series of maneu- vers or stratagems for obtaining the specific goal or result. MARKETINGAND THEARTOFWAR. E 19 | MedicinMan July 2013 孫子兵孫子兵法 孫子兵法 孫子 兵法 孫子兵法 孫子兵法 孫子 兵法 孫子兵法 孫子兵法 孫子 兵法 孫子兵法 孫子兵法 孫子 兵法 孫子兵法 孫子子兵法 孫 子兵法 孫子兵 法 孫子兵法 孫 子兵法 孫子兵 法 孫子子兵法 孫子兵法 孫子 兵 孫子兵法 孫 子法 孫子兵法 孫子孫子子子兵 法 孫子兵法 孫 子兵法 孫子兵 法 孫子 孫子兵 法 孫子 孫子兵 法 孫子兵法 孫 子 孫子兵法 孫 子 孫子兵法 孫 子 孫子兵法 孫 子兵法 孫 孫子 兵法 孫子 孫子 Prof. Vivek Hattangadi
  20. 20. 孫子兵 孫子兵 法 孫 子兵法 孫子兵 法 孫 子兵法 孫子兵 法 孫 子兵法 孫子兵 法 孫 子兵法 孫子兵 法 孫 子兵法 孫子兵 法 孫 子兵法 孫子兵 法 孫 子子兵 法 孫 子兵法 孫子兵 法 孫 子兵法 孫子兵 20 | MedicinMan July 2013 Marketing and the Art of War | Prof. Vivek Hattangadi 法 Tactics: Modus operandi to achieve an end, or a goal. “Strategy without tactics is the slowest route to victory. Tactics without strategy is the noise before defeat.”1 法 What do we call the people in the field (medical representatives and field managers) who fight competition in the market place – field force? In military parlance, it is the armed forces. 法 First mover advantage: It is the competitive advantage which a brand or the company gets, which pioneers the product. Says Sun Tzu: “Generally, he who occupies the field of battle first and awaits an ene- my is at ease; he who comes later to the scene and rushes into the fight is weary.”1 法 Grabbing the market share: Analogous to the territory which is be- ing fought over by two armies in a conflict:‘Can we grab a piece of the enemy land to get a strategic advantage’? (The market pie and how much share one wants from this pie and the strategic advantage of having a larger market share) 法 RCPA – Knowing your enemies (getting to know competitors strate- gies and tactics – James Bond style!): If you know the enemy and know yourself you need not fear the results of a hundred battles.1 Having said this, marketers apply the principles of military strategy to business situations against competing firms. This is similar to the two sides in a military conflict. Coming back, what is strategy and what are tactics? Many use these terms interchangeably, BUT THESE TERMS ARE NOT INTERCHANGE- ABLE. Tactics are the actual means used to gain an objective. Strategy is a game plan getting towards a goal.2 One of the most brilliant thoughts of Sun Tzu:“The supreme art of war is to subdue the enemy without fighting.”1 . How to execute this, has been beautifully explained in the book‘Blue Ocean Strategy’authored by W. Chan Kim and Renee Mauborgne.3 Having discussed about strategy and tactics let us now turn to the more important aspect,‘Strategy Execution’. Says the great Indo-American management thinker, Ram Charan: “Ex- ecution is the key as this is where the rubber hits the road and is the toughest part of the innovation cycle from ideation to strategizing to executing and then measuring the impact and sustaining the same”.4 We shall dwell more on Strategy Execution in the August 2013 Issue of MedicinMan! -VH References: 1. SunTzu.“The Art ofWar”. Pigeon Books India: New Delhi; 2009 2. Kotler Philip.“Marketing Management”. Prentice Hall of India New Delhi; 2001 3.W. Chan Kim Renee Mauborgne“Blue Ocean Strategy: How to Create Uncontested Market Space and Make the Competition Irrelevant”. Harvard Business School Press: Boston; 2009 4. Bossidy Larry Ram Charan.“Execution:The Discipline of GettingThing Done”. Crown Business: New York; 2002 STRATEGY TACTICS Strategy is the thinking process required to plan a course of action. Tactics are the specific actions taken in implementing a strategy. Strategy defines the desired goals and why one should go about achieving them. Actions include what is to be done and how it is to be done. E.g. the strategy is to become the market leader in the azithromycin market Making your brand the lowest price brand can become a tactic for gaining leadership E.g. Increase the market share of your brand through various brand building activities For this, various tactics can be used; like endorsing your brand through a celebrity like Sachin Tendulkar. Strategy is long term Tactics are short term
  21. 21. Best Bl ogsinH elathca re-India . For Natives and Immigrants. NAME: Apothecurry [apothecurry.wordpress.com] AUTHOR: Gauri Kamath NAME: Building Pharma Brands [buildingpharmabrands.com] AUTHOR: Subba Rao Chaganti ABOUT: Authored and edited by veteran healthcare journalist Gauri Kamath, Apothecurry is easily one of the best blogs on current issues pertaining to Indian pharma. Up-to-date and crisp, Apothecurry gives you the news behind the news. NOTABLE RECENT POSTS: 1.“Ponzi schemes in Indian pharma sales a real problem”: http://goo.gl/vby8W 2.“The Y K Hamied Interview”in Three parts: http://goo.gl/1OPHU ABOUT: A delightful mix of simple wisdom and important lessons from history marks this blog. The author boasts of over 45 years’experience in pharmaceutical marketing. NOTABLE RECENT POSTS: 1.“Medical Advertising: Pletal’s Attention-Grabbing Campaign!”: http://goo.gl/qYZbD 2.“1000 Marbles“: http://goo.gl/0rOOA DIGITAL DOSE E
  22. 22.         PREFERENCE MEASUREMENT IN ECONOMIC ANALYSIS IN HEALTHCARE. W hat are Preference-based health status mea- sures? Preference-based health status measures are instruments that define an individual’s health state for use in economic analysis in healthcare. In these measures, each possible health state is associated with an estimate of the value (preference or utility weight) that a surveyed sample of the general population (com- munity sample) has attributed to these health states. These preference-based measures are used for estima- tion of quality adjusted life years (QALYs).1,2 Defining the preferences for the health states experienced during a clinical trial. In a cost-effectiveness analysis done alongside a clinical trial, researchers elicit subject preferences for the health states they experience, using direct or indirect methods of elicitation. With direct methods, subjects in the trial directly score their preferences for the health states they experience. With indirect methods, subjects define the health states they experience by their responses to surveys about various aspects of their health. These responses are aggregated into a single score and are linked through the proprietary scoring algorithms of the selected system to preference weights established by surveys of non-patient community samples. Using the same or similar surveys, population weights for indirect methods have been established through this survey methodology and the proprietary scoring algorithms. In both cases, direct and indirect, these preference weights are used to calculate QALYs. Javed Shaikh is a Consultant (HEOR, Pricing, Reimbursement and Market Access) at Capita India, Mumbai. cpnjaved@gmail.com Shafaq Shaikh is an Associate (HEOR, Pricing, Reimbursement and Market Access) at Capita India, Mumbai. shafaq07@gmail.com ) 22 | MedicinMan July 2013 Direct and indirect methods of assigning weights or ascertaining preferences for different states of health. E
  23. 23. “ 23 | MedicinMan July 2013 Preference Measurement in Economic Analysis in Healthcare | Shafaq Shaikh Javed Shaikh COMMON APPROACHES TO ESTIMATING PREFERENCE WEIGHTS FOR ECONOMIC ANALYSIS ALONGSIDE CLINICAL TRIALS. I. Direct Methods In direct methods, individuals are asked to rate the desirability of various health states. Individuals rank their preferences, making trade-offs between health states and alternatives. Individuals make judgments based on their own relative values for the vari- ous domains or characteristics of the health state experienced or described. For example, an individual who values being “medica- tion-free” over mobility, will rank a health state differently from an individual who values mobility over freedom from medica- tion. The standard gamble and the time trade-off methods are the direct methods used to estimate preference or utility weights for economic evaluation. Direct methods might be used with subjects in a clinical trial, or to establish preference weights for indirect multi-attribute classification systems. 1. Standard Gamble (SG) The SG asks participants to consider a choice between a gamble and continuation of life in the current health state. The gamble offered is the probability of perfect health (p) or certain death (1- p). The probabilities for the two options in the gamble are altered until the participant is indifferent between the gamble with the risk of immediate death, and continuation of life in his or her current health state.3 The assumption is that in order to transi- tion into perfect health, people living in poorer health will accept a higher risk of death than individuals living in good health. Different procedures are used to determine this indifference point. The simplest procedure asks participants to state how much risk of death would make the two options equally attrac- tive. This can be done in an interview or on paper.4 Another set of procedures involves repeatedly presenting two options to patients, adjusting the risk (probability) of death between options until the participant is indifferent between the alternatives. This can be done using computer-based utility assessment software. The risk of immediate death can be adjusted using various meth- ods to present alternative scenarios. 2. Time Trade-off (TTO) The participants using the TTO are asked to decide how much time in perfect health they would be willing to give up in order to escape their current health.5 The idea is that in order to escape their current health condition, people living in poor health will accept a shorter life span in perfect health compared to people living in good health. The TTO is administered using the same techniques described above for the SG where alternative years forfeited are offered. There are paper-and-pencil versions of both the SG and TTO available, but computer-based programs have greater consistency and reliability. In direct methods for es- timating the weight of a health state, individuals are asked to rate the de- sirability of various health states. Individuals rank their preferences, making trade-offs between health states and alternatives. In- dividuals make judgments based on their own rela- tive values for the various domains or characteristics of the health state experi- enced or described. ” 
  24. 24. 24 | MedicinMan July 2013 Preference Measurement in Economic Analysis in Healthcare | Shafaq Shaikh Javed Shaikh 3. Visual Analog Scale (VAS) While the VAS has often been used for direct measurement, concerns about its validity in economic analysis have been raised. Drummond and Brazier do not recommend using the VAS alone in economic evaluation because the method does not give the respon- dent a choice between two alternatives, and therefore, does not reflect the strength of preference necessary for economic analysis.6,7 There is also concern that rating scales are particularly subject to a variety of measurement biases. These include end-of-scale bias, where respondents avoid the extremes (0 or 100), and context bias, where respondents distribute responses over the scale or aggregate choices in certain areas of the scale, regardless of the differences in health states. II. Multi-attribute or Indirect Methods Indirect methods use multi-attribute health status classification systems to define preference weights for the various health states experienced by subjects in a trial. Using surveys of a sample of the population and direct methods (SG, TTO or VAS transformed to SG), developers of these systems have estimated preference or utility weights for each defined health state in their system. These surveys elicited the sample’s preferences for various individual attributes of health. These attributes might include pain, mobility and self-care Preference scores for individual attributes of health have been trans- formed into a preference weight for each health state or combina- tion of attributes in the system. These preference weights have been integrated into the scoring algorithms in the classification system. In a cost-effectiveness analysis using an indirect method conducted alongside a clinical trial, subjects are surveyed with these multi-at- tribute systems. These surveys define the subject’s overall health sta- tus along several domains or attributes of health. Each combination of findings defines a health state. These health states are then associ- ated with the preference weights described above. In the cost-effec- tiveness analysis, the preference weights associated with each health state experienced by the subjects are used to calculate QALYs. Preference-based multi-attribute classification systems all mea- sure generic health status, but they vary by many factors including attributes, number of attribute levels, the description of the levels, the severity of the most severe level defined for each attribute, the number of health states defined, the communities from which the preference weights were estimated, and the theoretical approach to modeling preference data into the scoring formula of the classifica- tion system.7 As a result, multi-attribute classification systems are not equally suited for all diseases or disorders. SUMMARY Estimating preferences for states of health has been an active area of research in recent years. Unlike psychophysical approaches, which discriminate levels of health status, preference-based approaches incorporate values for health outcomes and can be used in cost-ef- fectiveness analyses to aid resource allocation decisions. - SS JS REFERENCES: 1. Torrance, G. W. Utility approach to measuring health-related quality of life. J Chronic Dis 1987; 40(6): 593-603. 2. Gold, M. R., Stevenson, D. and Fryback, D. G. HALYS and QALYS and DALYS, Oh My: similarities and differences in summary measures of population Health. Annu Rev Public Health 2002; 23: 115-34. 3. Gold, M. R., Siegel, J. E., Russell, L. B., et al. (1996). Cost-Effectiveness in Health and Medicine. New York, Oxford University Press. 4. Ross, P. L., Littenberg, B., Fearn, P., et al. Paper standard gamble: a paper-based measure of standard gamble utility for current health. Int J Technol Assess Health Care 2003; 19(1): 135-47. 5. Brazier, J., Deverill, M. and Green, C. A review of the use of health status measures in economic evaluation. J Health Serv Res Policy 1999; 4(3): 174-84. 6. Brazier, J. (2005). Current state of the art in preference-based measures of health and avenues for further research. The University of Sheffield School of Health and Related Research, Health Economics and Decision Science Discussion Paper Series. Sheffield, University of Sheffield: 1-21. 7. Drummond, M. F., Sculpher, M. J., Torrance, G. W., et al. (2005). Methods for the Economic Evaluation of Health Care Programmes. Oxford, Oxford University Press.   )
  25. 25. Where: Hyatt Regency, Mumbai When: 15th July 2013 Website: http://www.kcapital-us.com/leadership/ Special management program “Leadership in Action” with Dr. Marshall Goldsmith on 15th July @ Hyatt Regency, Mumbai, very intensive course that is all about you and the impact your leadership and management style has on your team and your organization as a whole. Through an intensive mix of lecture, small group work, role-play and one-on-one time with Dr. Marshall, participants will develop an action plan that will be immediately actionable upon their return to the workplace. BENEFITS OUTCOMES: The Elite Leadership Program with Marshall has been designed for a select gathering of high-level leaders. It will provide a unique environment in which to tackle the most critical challenges facing senior business leaders today. • Be inspired to lead by example and learn new ways to improve the morale of your team • Implement feedforward, a process that enables positive productive action to get more done. • Learn how to make adjustments to the habits you want to change to become an extraordinary leader. • Develop strategies that create a positive perception of long-term change. Enroll today to meet tomorrow’s challenges! If you have any questions at all about the program: Contact Nikita Mob: +91-98928-38970. Email: nikita@kcapital-us.com “LEADERSHIP IN ACTION”

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