Has Pharma Marketing Forgotten the Patient?
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Like this? Share it with your network

Share

Has Pharma Marketing Forgotten the Patient?

  • 1,380 views
Uploaded on

Inside this Issue: ...

Inside this Issue:

1. Sun Rise for Indian Pharma by Prof. Vivek Hattangadi
Sun Pharma’s meteoric rise on the global stage and the man who made it happen.

2. Mergers Fail More Often than Marriages by Chandan Kumar
Mergers, like marriages, have a lot of potential for going bad unless both parties make a concerted effort to allay the other’s fears.

3. Dermato-Cosmetology Gets a Face-lift by K. Hariram
Using Empathy, Focus and Imputation to deliver value and to delight your customers.

4. Sound out on Social Media! - Special Feature
Voice your opinion on matters concerning your career and profession on Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn.

5. Has Pharma Marketing Forgotten the Patient? by Salil Kallianpur
Pharma marketeers will only deliver real value when the patient is at the center of every promotional effort and decision.

6. Difference between OTC & Prescription Marketing by Kumud Kandpal
A Knowledge for the Medical Rep Series.

  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
    Be the first to like this
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
1,380
On Slideshare
1,377
From Embeds
3
Number of Embeds
2

Actions

Shares
Downloads
25
Comments
0
Likes
0

Embeds 3

http://podidoo.com 2
http://www.linkedin.com 1

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. MEDICINMANField Force Excellence TM May 2014 | www.medicinman.net pharmamarketing and its significance for Attention Economy! In an era of infor- mation overload, there is pressure on not just the time but the ATTENTION of customers. Nowhere is this more evident than in Indian Phar- ma where hundreds of branded generics vie for the attention of doctors. W hen I began my sales career with Eureka Forbes in the 80s in Mumbai, (in the 80s it was called“Bombay”!) the first lesson that was drilled into us was the AIDA (Attention, Interest, Desire, Action) model of selling. And AIDA began with the salesperson – his Attire, Appearance, Attitude and Abilities – the four aces of successful selling. I have used the AIDA model - with some variations - quite effectively in pharma and devices sales. It helps to have a model, even though, given the challenges of time, it may not always be possible to implement all the steps in every call. Nevertheless a roadmap is needed to avoid getting lost in the hustle and bustle of hectic field work. Most pharma companies, especially MNCs, have a rigorous model of SFE, which they believe will ensure call effectiveness. It just might, but the question is – in what percentage of the daily calls? One would be lucky if 50% of daily calls are effective by SFE standards. This is especially so in the Attention Economy. Herbert A. Simon was perhaps the first person to articulate the concept of attention economics when he wrote: “In an information-rich world, the wealth of information means a dearth of something else: a scarcity of whatever it is that information consumes. What information consumes is rather obvious: it consumes the attention of its recipients. Hence a wealth of information creates a poverty of attention”. Simply put, Attention Economics says that,“in an era of information overload, there is pressure on not just the time but the ATTENTION of customers.”Nowhere is this more evident than in Indian Pharma where hundreds of branded generics vie for the attention of doctors. Still, pharma marketing managers are blindly investing scarce resources by throwing more information at an attention scarce audience. I have said as far back as 2006 in my book HardKnocks for the GreenHorn that the printed visual aid deserves to be a museum relic, instead of an in-clinic communication medium. Pharma marketing managers seem to have attention deficit and fail to respond to the changing world around them. Editorial Since 2011 “ ”
  • 2. Anup Soans | Editorial: Attention Economy and it Significance for Pharma Marketing Richie Etwaru, VP, Clouding & Digital Innovation at Cegedim, says: “Consumers want marketing and advertising to be more personal, engaging and meaningful. Telling them about your product is boring, and no longer a viable mechanism to engage with customers.” Here are some key learnings from Richie Etwaru’s article, “Nine things marketing managers should consider when desiring to engage consumers who no longer want to give their attention to boring and scripted product descriptions”: 1. Messaging — Winning brands have strong narratives that catch the attention of customers. 2. Media — We’re a visual culture. Use powerful images that evoke emotions, attract attention and engage customers. 3. Measured—Strive to quantify your effectiveness. Otherwise, you’re at risk of appearing out of touch with consumers that are increasingly less forgiving. 4. Medium—Be ubiquitous across all devices—achieve omni-channel over multi-channel. By being ever-present, ever-visible, you have an opportunity to generate incredible emotional equity with consumers. 5. Many—Accept that people are more influenced by others (read, KOLs) than brands. It’s a secondary influence marketplace. You now need to capture your audience’s audience. (Se e MedicinMan’s“How to Cultivate KOLs and Grow Your Business ) 6. Minutes— Be consistently visible to capture consumers with microscopic attention spans. 7. Multi-directional—Touch points are everywhere, and in every direction. Listen to and understand the diverse ecosystems where consumers are letting their voices be heard. 8. Meaningful—Intelligence is being democratized. Consumers don’t read ads, they’re reading for brain food. If your message isn’t contextual and focused on proliferating valuable information, it will fall flat. 9. Movement—Join one. No brand is an island. All of today’s market leaders are a part of a movement— whether it’s about celebrating the human spirit or educating someone—it centers on something good that you just happen to be a part of. Even if pharma marketing managers are able to incorporate some of the above points into their marketing efforts, they will not only engage better with customers, more importantly, they will create a better equipped and fully engaged field force. -AS 2 | MedicinMan May 2014 References: 1.“Marketing in the Modern Attention Economy: 9 “M-Words”Modern CMOs Should Consider by Richie Etwaru; http://bit.ly/1gSOoDO Connect with Anup Soans on LinkedIn | Facebook | Twitter Anup Soans is an Author, Facilitator and the Editor of MedicinMan. Write in to him: anupsoans@medicinman.net Meet the Editor Richie Etwaru, VP, Clouding & Digital Innovation at Cegedim, says: “Consumers want marketing and advertising to be more personal, engaging and meaningful. Telling them about your product is boring, and no longer a viable mechanism to engage with customers.”
  • 3. *INR 800/- for 1 copy of both the books inclusive of Speed Post charges. Contact anupsoans@gmail.com | +91-93422-32949 for more details. MRP Rs. 599/- “When the only tool you have is a hammer, every problem looks like a nail.” Stop hammering away at your role as a front-line pharma professional and get the right tools for the job! MRP Rs. 799/- Special 1+1 offer A1,398 800/- * HardKnocks for the GreenHorn and SuperVision for the SuperWiser Front-line Manager are best-selling books that have been widely used to develop and motivate front-line pharma professionals. Written by industry veteran Anup Soans, these books will give you the Knowledge, Attitude, Skills and Habits (KA$H) to succeed in you role as a Medical Rep or Front- line Manager.
  • 4. 1. Sun Rise for Indian Pharma................................5 Sun Pharma’s meteoric rise on the global stage and the man who made it happen. Prof. Vivek Hattangadi 2. Mergers Fail More Often than Marriages.......10 Mergers, like marriages, have a lot of potential for going bad unless both parties make a concerted effort to allay the other’s fears. Chandan Kumar 3. Dermato-Cosmetology Gets a Face-lift..........15 A once-neglected specialty is now in great demand thanks to advances in technology and treatments. K. Hariram 4. Sound out on Social Media!.............................18 Voice your opinion on matters concerning your career and profession on Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn. Special Feature 5. Has Pharma Marketing Forgotten the Patient? .................................................................................19 Pharma marketeers will only deliver real value when the patient is at the center of every promotional effort and decision. Salil Kallianpur 6. Difference between OTC & Prescription Marketing...............................................................23 A Knowledge for the Medical Rep Series Kumud Kandpal MedicinMan Volume 4 Issue 5 | May 2014 Editor and Publisher Anup Soans CEO Chhaya Sankath COO Arvind Nair Chief Mentor K. Hariram Advisory Board Prof. Vivek Hattangadi; Jolly Mathews Editorial Board Salil Kallianpur; Dr. Shalini Ratan; Shashin Bodawala; Prabhakar Shetty; Vardarajan S; Dr. Mandar Kubal; Dr. Surinder Kumar International Editorial Board Hanno Wolfram; Renie McClay Executive Editor Joshua Soans MedicinMan Academy: Prof. Vivek Hattangadi, Dean, Professional Skills Development Letters to the Editor: anupsoans@medicinman.net CONTENTS (Click to navigate)
  • 5. 5 | MedicinMan May 2014 A s a Carter Wallace man, I took great pride in promoting the sensational antidepressant, Sensival (Nortriptyline from Carter Wallace). Till 1986 no other company produced this molecule, till one day I spotted somewhere a product called Primox from a company called Sun Pharma. I was intrigued. Who would‘dare’introduce such an exclusive product of Carter Wallace? Very soon, I saw an advertisement from Sun Pharma for the position of Product Manager. I applied, not with the intention of joining the company, but to meet the person who introduced a product to compete with Sensival. I shall never forget that date - 17th May 1987. I had almost an entire day’s discussion with Dilip Shanghvi. He was sharing his dreams and future prospects. He had decided to manufacture drugs that only a handful of multinational companies made. The discussions further revolved around an exclusive drug that Carter Wallace had – Salazopyrin – for ulcerative colitis. I explained to him the disease, the mode of action of action of Salazopyrin and its side- effects. He thought for a while and said“I shall bring out a product to end the exclusivity of Salazopyrin.”I quickly realized he was a man of substance and great vision (we were later to introduce Mesacol). SUNRISEFOR INDIANPHARMAProf. Vivek Hattangadi Sun Pharma’s meteoric rise on the global stage and the man who made it happen. Prof. Vivek Hattangadi is a Consultant in Pharma Brand Management and Sales Training at The Enablers. He is also visiting faculty at CIPM Calcutta (Vidyasagar University) for their MBA course in Pharmaceutical Management. vivekhattangadi@theenablers.org E
  • 6. Way back in October 1989 Dilip Shanghvi asked all the executives to appraise him; and let him know his weaknesses and strengths on the Likert Scale. We were surprised. The Chief of an organization is asking the subordinates to appraise him? Prof. Vivek Hattangadi | Sun Rise for Indian Pharma 6 | MedicinMan May 2014 His objectives were crystal clear: to build brands of global standards. At the end of the day I took a big decision (and a risk too) of leaving a cushy job in a MNC to join Sun Pharma, to set up the Product Management Team. But even in the wildest of my dreams, I never thought I was talking to a person who would become the most successful and talked about pharma entrepreneur in the world. In 1989 Sun Pharma moved to Baroda and that brought us closer. He talked about us being a much bigger company than Torrent Pharma which he had benchmarked. Torrent Pharma had by then moved in to the top 10 and Sun Pharma was not even in the first 200. When he shared his dream with a top pharma executive from a neighboring Baroda giant pharma house, the No. 1 pharma company then, he dubbed Dilip Shanghvi a megalomaniac and mocked his dream. I then realized the hazards of shallow thinking and how such people at the top can demolish organizations. Dilip Shanghvi has the knack of identifying the right people and retaining them – the major reason for the success of Sun Pharma. Way back in October 1989 he asked all the executives to appraise him; and let him know his weaknesses and strengths on the Likert Scale. We were surprised. The Chief of an organization is asking the subordinates to appraise him? We had never heard of this before! Replied Dilip Shanghvi:“I want to use this appraisal to assess my own performance and help me to pave a path for the future of your Sun Pharma. And remember, I want this appraisal every six months.” He went on to add:“Would you also like to be evaluated like this?”It is much later that the concept of 360º appraisal was formally used even in the western world. Not only this appraisal strategy made me respect this man more than ever before, but also his words ‘your Sun Pharma’(my Sun Pharma) kept on resonating in my mind and ears. Today, Sun Pharma has adopted its own method of evaluation of their personnel, not on the basis of numbers or their failures, but on the basis of their quantum of their contribution to the organization. On a casual Saturday evening in the winter of 1988, he called all the senior executives for a meeting. Sun Pharma had recorded a sale of Rs. 1 crore that month and he wanted to celebrate and reward us all. And what a reward he gave! He arranged for a computer to teach us the basics of computers. This was back in 1988. He told us to be computer savvy. He wanted Sun Pharma to be paperless office. Great thinking! “ ”
  • 7. Dilip Shanghvi has the knack of delegating responsibilities. He trusts his people and this trust has benefited Sun. ‘I love to be confronted on any idea I have floated. If the person can prove with superior logic that I am wrong, I shall accept the other person’s logic.” This is how Monotrate was born. Prof. Vivek Hattangadi | Sun Rise for Indian Pharma 7 | MedicinMan May 2014 Dilip Shanghvi also has the knack of delegating responsibilities. He trusts his people and this trust has benefited Sun.‘I love to be confronted on any idea I have floated. If the person can prove with superior logic that I am wrong, I shall accept the other person’s logic.”This is how Monotrate was born. In 1988, he told me that he had a beautiful cardiac product in mind but it wouldn’t sell, as it was almost 12 times the price of competition. He was also dissuaded by his team of medical advisors on this product – isosorbide-5-mononitrate. I was more than confident about its marketability. I discussed this product at great length with him, but he was still not convinced. I then met leading cardiologists of Mumbai and Delhi at that time – doctors like Dr. Ashwin Mehta, Dr. Dev. Pehlajani and Dr. M. Khalilullah and Dr. Naresh Trehan. Their feedback was very encouraging. Dilip Shanghvi finally relented and Monotrate 20 was marketed at Rs. 4.00 per tablet (in 1988) when Sorbitrate was priced at 10 paise a tablet! Monotrate went on to be a grand success and paved the foundation of the first super-specialty (cardiology) Division in 1991. This is what happens when CEOs trust people. Fast and reliable decision-making is extremely vital in today’s competitive business landscape. Dilip Shanghvi is aware of this and he takes quick decisions – in a blink. He has the foresight and vision to anticipate changes from his decisions. 9 out of 10 times his quick decision-making abilities have benefited the organization. CEOs who fear to take decisions have no right to head a company, he once told me. Such companies will be laggards and may even be wiped out. In the 1980’s, his vision used to stretch 10 years ahead. 1999 was the year when Sun Pharma overtook Torrent Pharma and he had predicted this in 1989! In the 21st Century, I can safely assume that he thinks 25 years ahead! The biggest challenge for him now is to integrate Ranbaxy with Sun Pharma. Realizing synergies through this deal will certainly be a big trial for him. Daiichi-Sankyo must be certainly relieved to get rid of the white elephant. But Dilip Shanghvi has an enviable reputation for acquiring distressed firms at a good price, and then turning them around. An example is Taro Pharma of Israel and URL Pharma USA (not be mistaken for a dot.com company). According to Hoovers, a leading business analyst company, the credit rating of URL at the time of acquisition was‘LOW’! And what a turnaround he brought! “ ”
  • 8. Although the Sun Pharma- Ranbaxy deal now makes Sun Pharma the leading Indian pharma company, the deal is not without its challenges. Sun Pharma is very strong in chronic and lifestyle therapies. These therapies provide higher margins; on the other hand, Ranbaxy has a strong presence in acute therapies and over-the- counter drugs. Chairman of Sun Pharma Mr. Israel Makov says the Ranbaxy transaction allows Sun Pharma to build on Ranbaxy’s global footprint and established product portfolio. Prof. Vivek Hattangadi | Sun Rise for Indian Pharma 8 | MedicinMan May 2014 In a press statement in March 2013 Dilip Shanghvi said: “While it took us almost 27 years to record $1 billion in revenues, the next billion was added in just 3 years.”In March 2014, Sun Pharma has added Rs. 35000.00 crores - or 44% - to shareholders’wealth. Sun Pharma is the fastest- growing generic company in the US, which accounts for 80 per cent of consolidated revenues. After its recently announced merger with Ranbaxy, Sun will become the market leader in India by a wide margin and one of the country’s top generic drug companies. Talking about his vision, Dilip Shanghvi knows he is not immortal. He is aware that the future of Sun Pharma is to a very great extent dependent on him. But he has already drawn out the succession plan. Sun Pharma will continue to grow and outshine others. He wants to follow the footsteps of another equally great, Narayana Murthy and has decided to support Sun Pharma from outside as a Mentor, from 2018, when he will be 65. Although the Sun Pharma-Ranbaxy deal now makes Sun Pharma the leading Indian pharma company, the deal is not without its challenges. Sun Pharma is very strong in chronic and lifestyle therapies. These therapies provide higher margins; on the other hand, Ranbaxy has a strong presence in acute therapies and over-the-counter drugs. Chairman of Sun Pharma Mr. Israel Makov says the Ranbaxy transaction allows Sun Pharma to build on Ranbaxy’s global footprint and established product portfolio.“Since the product offerings are complementary, we expect to derive immediate synergies from the enhanced footprint across regions, and opportunities for brand-building and cross-selling. The combined business will also have a strong portfolio of products for chronic and acute (diseases) marketed globally.” A Bank of America - Merrill Lynch analyst says,“While we acknowledge Ranbaxy will likely have its own challenges, Ranbaxy’s gross margins (63-64 per cent) are largely in line with Indian peers. Regulatory overhangs and high fixed costs have depressed Ranbaxy’s profitability, where Sun Pharma can bring its operational strength.” How will Sun Pharma handle the field force? Ranbaxy has a much bigger field force than Sun Pharma, but with lower sales than Sun Pharma. Says Dilip Shanghvi:“Our focus would be to grow field force productivity for the business.” He does not see cultural differences in the working styles “ ”
  • 9. Prof. Vivek Hattangadi | Sun Rise for Indian Pharma 9 | MedicinMan May 2014 of Ranbaxy and Sun as an issue. He adds:“Even though people are culturally different, some basic human traits, which ultimately lead to performance, are common (to all).” Bengal gave birth to the first pharmaceutical company in India. Now, this man from Bengal (born and brought up in Kolkata) is here to take India to new heights in the global pharma industry. The name Sun Pharma today evokes huge respect and admiration across the pharma world. Sun Pharma…Sun, the unlimited source of ultimate and endless energy. -VH “ ” Says Dilip Shanghvi: “Our focus would be to grow field force productivity for the business.” He does not see cultural differences in the working styles of Ranbaxy and Sun as an issue. He adds: “Even though people are culturally different, some basic human traits, which ultimately lead to performance, are common (to all) Abdul Basit Khan Ajay Kumar Dua Amlesh Ranjan Amrutha Bhavthankar Andris A. Zoltners Anthony Lobo Aparna Sharma Arvind Nair Atish Mukherjee B. Ramanathan Chayya Sankath Craig Dixon Devanand Chenuri Venkat Dinesh Chindarkar Dr. Amit Dang Dr. Aniruddha Malpani Dr. Hemant Mittal Dr. Neelesh Bhandari Dr. S. Srinivasan Dr. Shalini Ratan Dr. Surinder Kumar Sharma Dr. Ulhas Ganu Geetha G H H. J. Badrinarayana Hakeem Adebiyi Hanno Wolfram Hitendra Kansal Iyer Gopalkrishna Jasvinder Singh Banga Javed Shaikh Jitendra Singh John Gwillim Jolly Mathews Joshua Mensch K Hariram K. Satya Mahesh Ken Boyce Mahendra Rai Mala Raj Manoj Kumar Mayank Saigal Milan Sinha Mohan Lal Gupta Neelesh Bhandari Neha Ansa Nishkarsh Likhar Noumaan Qureshi Parveen Gandhi Pinaki Ghosh PK Sinha Prabhakar Shetty Vivek Hattangadi Rachana Narayan Rajesh Rangarajan Ralph Boyce Renie McClay Richa Goyel Richard Ilsley RM Saravanan Sagar S. Pawar Salil Kallianpur Salil Kallianpur Sally E. Lorimer Sandhya Pramanik Sanjay Munshi Shafaq Shaikh Shalini Ratan Sharad Virmani Shiv Bhasin Spring Sudhakar Subba Rao Chaganti Sudhakar Madhavan Tony O’Connor V. Srinivasan Varadharajan K. Vijaya Shetty Vishal V. Bhaiyya Vishal Verma Vivek Hattangadi William Fernandez Our Authors MEDICINMAN invites contributions from Pharma professionals on topics related to Field Force Excellence. See: www.medicinman.net/author-guidelines for more information.
  • 10. 10 | MedicinMan May 2014 April was the month of M&A for pharma as Sun Pharma acquired Diachi-owned Ranbaxy! But often these M&A`s fail to produce real benefit for the employees, and much value gets destroyed. The chief reasons for failure is people and cultural differences. And here is no reason to believe that the condition has improved till date as true mergers are just a dream and in almost all M&A`s one side has pole posi- tion and is able to set the agenda. It has been evident that imposing a dominant uni-culture always flops, as it does not reflect how employees work when they merge. M&A`s appeal for alliance, but non cooperative or fear- based behaviour is natural as employees comprehend that they might be directly in race with their counterparts. Merg- ers have a strong negative personal impact on sales force as positions were often decided by favouritism rather than talent & calibre. A Sales Rep often looks for a job change after M&A as the stress at work becomes incredible. To mitigate risks during mergers and acquisitions there are couple of key factors that practised together may maximize Sales force integration. 1. Communicate about Vision Sales people often tend to fill the silence with gossips and assumptions and this does not leads to a optimistic, & commercially energetic environment. To overcome these problems a good internal communication is important in or- der to lessen the risk to the business by retaining efficiency and sales employee motivation. The communication helps tp encourage employees during this time of ambiguity, by providing information on the vision and objective behind the mergers and acquisitions. Chandan Kumar E MERGERS FAILMORE OFTENTHAN MARRIAGESMergers, like marriages, have a lot of potential for going bad unless both parties make a concerted effort to allay the others’ fears. Chandan Kumar is working in healthcare publishing as an Acquisitions Editor. His area of Interest is Healthcare Marketing & Value Innovation. ckumar21@in.com http://www.linkedin.com/in/pharmtech @pharmacrat
  • 11. 11 | MedicinMan May 2014 2. Express the Benefits to the Sales Team Low morale and enthusiasm due to insecurity are com- mon and this can be curtailed by answering the common questions of sales force. Questions in employees’minds are “What’s in it for me?”,“Will I get good products to promote?”, “Better entry to physicians?”and“Will I have access to worthy sales tools?”The organisation must resolve these queries and reach an agreement with the sales force. Organisations need to substantiate the advantages of the merger to the sales force, explaining the reason of the deal and its impacts on their roles and their compensation structures. 3. Convey How to accomplish goals Explain to the sales force what success looks like in current, short term & long term scenarios; the more you convey these visions, the easier for sales people to build confidence. The sales force wants know of how their activities will interpret into the organization achieving its goals. Give Sales Force clear understanding ofwhat is required from them, product offerings, process, and other mechanisms. It would be advised to have a little reduction of sales targets in early stages, mak- ing them feel that they are achieving tangible goals quickly. This boosts the morale of the sales team. This is also a vital time to capitalize in training to address any competency gaps. 4. Cultural Integration To ease difficulties during mergers and acquisitions, cultural integration should start well before the finalisation. The ac- quiring company should be clear about their plans on cultural front. Handling cultural issues wrongly can destroy much of the value of M&A that was thought to create. There are three possibilities which can be worked: • Allow the two cultures to remain separate. • Force the one culture over other. • Composite culture: This can be attained by performing a gap analysis of each merging culture. Here the key is to shape up the interaction and communication networks between the working teams & individuals by conducting informal events. There is a need to remember the best practices, strategies and systems of the two cultures. Merging systems and strategies is the best ways to signal the sales employees that a merger is a win-win for all. Involve Sales people in the discussions as you choose what to keep and what to eliminate. No other administrative project is as difficult as M&A integra- tion and has high risk of miscalculations. The past is full of example where mergers have failed due to cultural differenc- es. Not even every second M&A`s succeeds in creating its syn- ergies and creating additional value. Following a disciplined, process oriented methodology and applying proper practices to sales integration is vital to M&A`s success. -CK E “ ” Low morale and enthusiasm due to insecurity are common and this can be curtailed by answering the common questions of sales force. Chandan Kumar | Mergers Fail More Often than Marriages
  • 12. EMPOWER YOUR FIELD FORCE KA$H=CASH REPEAT Rx Pharma-specific Training:  Medical Representatives  Field Sales Managers  Senior Managers Learning and Development Programs from the Leaders in Pharma Field Force Excellence Signature Programs for Medical Representatives Constructed on the fundamental premise that a Medical Representative’s success depends on his Knowledge, Attitudes, Skills and Habits (KA$H). Representatives seek success in their personal and professional lives but look for it in the wrong places leaving them frustrated. Companies and bottom-lines suffer when the front-line is not ful- ly engaged. KA$H=CASH is a high-engagement module for customer-facing employees. Repeat Rx is an advanced module for customer-facing Representatives based on the book by Anup Soans. Repeat Rx focuses on building lasting relationships with Doctors by creating value through a process of Calling > Connecting > Consulting > Collaborating with the Doctor. At each stage of this Four Stage process the Represen- tative acquires measurable skills and competencies that enable him to add value in the Doctor’s chamber. Repeat Rx comes with detailed evaluation tools. In Any Profession, More KA$H = More Cash KNOWLEDGE  ATTITUDES  SKILLS  HABITS MEDICINMAN
  • 13. SuperVision for the SuperWiser Front-line Manager. WHY SHOULD ANY- ONE FOLLOW YOU? THE HALF-TIME COACH anupsoans@gmail.com | +91-934-2232-949 | www.medicinman.net Signature Programs for Front-line Managers Signature Programs for Second-line and Senior Managers Based on the best-selling book by Anup Soans, this program is for new and experienced Front-line Managers who would like to get breakthrough performance from their teams. SuperVision for the SuperWiser Front-line Manager focus- es on topics such as Team Building, Emotional Intelligence, Situational Leadership, Coaching and more. VALUE ADD: Psychometric Assessment* The Half-Time Coach is based on the concept of half-time in football. If half-time is so crucial in a game that last only 90 minutes, how much more important in a career that last a life time. The Half-Time Coach is a learning-by-reflection program with a focus on Coaching Skills for senior managers. Mod- ules also cover Self Awareness, Emotional Intelligence, Em- ployee Engagement and Sales Change Management. VALUE ADD: Psychometric Assessment* A walk-the-talk program for cross-functional senior managers to understand the process of employee engagement, creating trust and building relation- ships to build and sustain high-performance teams. VALUE ADD: Psychometric Assessment* *Psychometrics assessments give in-depth insights into one’s personality preferences and its impact on interpersonal relationships and teamwork.
  • 14. anupsoans@gmail.com | +91-934-2232-949 | www.medicinman.net Methodology Webinars and E-Learning All programs are fully customizable. A pre-program questionnaire is used to capture the needs and expectations of the participants. Company’s may request a demonstration of a particular module at no expense (except conveyance to venue). Programs incorporate the principles of adult learning and are highly participative, audio-vi- sual and activity-based. Important truths are conveyed through games, stories and videos. Companies are advised to give participants the books on which the programs are based for continued learning and development. The same may be procured from the author at a discount. Company’s may choose to deliver a program as a webi- nar - giving the advantage of scale and lowering costs. Audiences are kept engaged using visually stimulating slides and powerful delivery. Emphasis is placed on taking charge of one’s success, even in the absence of oversight. Most recently 1,000 reps of a leading MNC were trained over four webinars with excellent feedback. Customized issues of MedicinMan, with inputs from the company can be given to the Field Force for their continuous learning and development. MedicinMan currently reaches 60,000 pharma professionals. Interactive Classroom Training Management Games Audio/Visual Learning-by-reflectionSimulation Case Studies iSharpenMMy Success is My Responsibiliti
  • 15. I n the 70s when I was working as a Medical Rep in Vijayawa- da, Andhra Pradesh I vividly recollect that dermatology was hardly looked at as an important segment. The boards of those practising dermatology highlighted“Sexually Transmit- ted Diseases”and mostly, the qualification was MBBS DD or DVD. The clinics were invariably dull looking with some post- ers of diseases like eczema, fungal infections and psoriasis. The beginning of 21st century saw a change come in and this change has become more pronounced, today. The specialty where postgraduate seats were once upon a time taken by those who did not get subjects that they really wanted, is now in demand! So, it is more than just a play on words to say that dermatol- ogists represent the changing face of the medical profession. The advances dermatologists have embraced in their clinical practice and professional milieu place them at medicine’s cutting edge. Unlike the 70s and 80s, today is a good time to be a dermatologist. Medical and surgical dermatology are well-established, while cosmetic dermatology is growing in exponential leaps and bounds. K. Hariram 15 | MedicinMan May 2014 A once-neglected specialty is now in great demand thanks to advances in technology and treatments. E DERMATO-COSMETOLOGY GETSAFACE-LIFT K. Hariram is the former MD (retd.) at Galderma India. He is Chief Mentor at MedicinMan and a regular contributor. khariram25@yahoo.com
  • 16. 16 | MedicinMan May 2014 Certainly the technology has changed the face of the profession. Many dermatologist clinics are equipped with up-to-date Skin Lasers & Dermato-Surgery has become a super specialty segment. With Derma- to-surgery, laser therapy and cosmetology becoming sub-specialties of dermatology the branch is looking more vibrant than ever before1 . Come Navrathri or the marriage season and you can see people rushing into the Derms’clinic to get a facelift or remove acne scars or smoothen furrows on the forehead. There’s no denying that the line between dermatology - the medical specialty devoted to skin disorders and diseases - and cosmetology - the prac- tice of improving a person’s appearance - is becoming increasingly blurred. Indeed, the term“cosmeceutical”- a product marketed as a cosmetic that purportedly has biologically active ingredients that affect the user - has sprung up to de- fine a broad gray area where the practice of medicine and the pursuit of vanity meet. There are many reasons for this including the aging of the baby boom generation; increasingly effective alternatives to plastic surgery, such as Allergan’s Botox; and the financial disincentives of managed care. Add them all up, and cosmeceuticals comes to a booming business that has implications far beyond the promise of diminished crow’s feet and less-visible laugh lines. Almost all Dermatologists who come out of their MD (Derm) qualification show a general preference to move into cosmetology practice because it improves patient’s self-esteem and fetches compliments. Be- sides, if dermatologists were not to treat these patients, they could have succumbed to the lure of the pseu- do-cosmetologists (or self-claimed beauticians) who practice without proper qualification. The shift to cosmetology is not a case of dermatolo- gists going out of focus, but a clear shift towards the newer demands of society and to scientifically under- stand and choose efficient anti-aging creams, newer cosmeceuticals and master the skills of laser surgery. This changing trend clearly reflects in the shifting der- matology pharmaceutical. A close look at the market audit (Dataset: PharmaTrac MAT FEB 2014 – AWACS) data clearly reveals that D class representing the Der- ma segment is growing twice as that of IPM (as of MAT Feb 14). K. Hariram | Dermato-Cosmetology Gets a Face-lift “ ” Certainly the technology has changed the face of the profession. Many dermatologist clinics are equipped with up- to-date Skin Lasers & Dermato-Surgery has become a super specialty segment. With Dermato-surgery, laser therapy and cosmetology becoming sub-specialties of dermatology the branch is looking more vibrant than ever before. References: 1.“Dermatologists Shifting Focus?”by Dr.Vibha A. Nigale, Dr. RajanT. D., Dr. Ashwin R. Kosambia)
  • 17. This growing and evolving trend is reflected in the categories: 14% 17 | MedicinMan May 2014 ” So the unasked question is – “Will the same old sales model work or will the same old approach to selling and marketing work including those representing the emerging divisions/ companies in this segment?” E “ Emollients & Protectives Hair care Demelenising Agents Sunscreeens 26% 28% 19% The beginning of 21st century witnessed the launch of companies (Galderma) dedicated totally to dermatology and Dermato-cosmetology. The sequel to this was many established companies like GSK, Glenmark, Ranbaxy (now with SUN), J&J, Zydus cadila jumping the band wagon with launch of exclusive divisions dedicated to Derma portfolio. Further, many of these companies have now en- tered into Dermato-cosmetology/Aesthetic dermatology with separate Sales and marketing personnel. Invariably, we are going to witness high priced products, high end procedures, and high technology equipment and more importantly, the clinics of the Dermatologists are going to be swanky, modern aesthetics and up-to- date. So the unasked question is –“Will the same old sales model work or will the same old approach to selling and marketing work including those representing the emerging divisions/ companies in this segment?” Obviously, NOT if one has to find acceptance with the dermatologist/s. Right from the attire, dressing, behaviour, knowledge and skills there has to be a sea change. Embracing technology, social media marketing, patient awareness, knowledge dissemination, training academies etc. a complete overall has to be done. May be a good time to re-visit yesteryears’practices. Overall, this new emerging trend of the FUTURE is open- ing up yet another OPPORTUNITY in Specialty Pharma selling. Are the companies and their Sales and Marketing struc- ture ready to embrace this change? -KH K. Hariram | Dermato-Cosmetology Gets a Face-lift Editors Note: Special thanks to Hari Natarajan, Vice President, AIOCD PharmaSoftech AWACS for the data in this article.
  • 18. 18 | MedicinMan May 2014 D r. Ganesh S. Pai is the former President of the Indian Association of Dermatologists. He has many publications to his credit and was a visiting profes- sor to the St. Johns’Institute of Dermatology, St. Thomas’ hospital, London in 1995. He has presented guest lectures on various lasers in Oman, Venice, Turkey, Bahrain, Abu Dhabi, Beijing, Florence, London and Melbourne between 1999 & 2006. Dr. Ganesh S. Pai is the Life Member of Indian Association of Dermatologists, Venereologists & Leprologists and Indi- an Medical Association. E DR. GANESH S. PAI, MD., D.V.D., FAAD., is the Medical Director, Skin and Cosmetology Centre and is a consultant in Dermatology and Cosmetic Care for the past 30 years in Mangalore, Karnataka MEDICINMANKOLSERIES Therapy Focus Area: Dermato-Cosmetology Derma-Care founded by Dr. Ganesh Pai is one of India’s largest laser centre in Mangalore, South India. The clinic boasts of 4000 sq feet of exclusive space of housing eight different lasers with multiple functions from skin rejuvenation to surgical application for scars, tattoos, freckles, wrinkles, moles, acne and hair removal. It also offers advanced phototherapy care for chronic distressing skin conditions such as psoriasis, vitiligo and atopic dermatitis. Derma-Care caters to the growing cosmetically conscious population which is primarily from Karnataka, Kerala, Mumbai and the Gulf countries. -MM Visit http://www.derma-care.in/ KOLManagementWorkshop A MedicinMan Initiative OBJECTIVE: This workshop will be hands on approach to understanding the challenges and identifying solutions to help you develop an effective KOL management strategy. TARGET AUDIENCE - Field Force people responsible for KOL management - Marketing team people involved in KOL management - Medical Affairs people engaged in KOL management - Members of existing KOL management team - MSLs responsible for KOL Management - Company shortlisted candidates for KOL management TOPICS (included, but not limited to:) 1. Moving from a Sales Mindset to KOL Relationship Management Mindset 2. Understanding Factors that Lead to KOL Satisfaction 3. Effective Communication – The Key Skill for KOL Relationship Management 4. Understanding and Executing Effective KOL Relationship Management program 5. Interaction and Q & A with a leading KOL WORKSHOP LEADER: Anup Soans Anup Soans has worked as a Medical Rep, Oncology Product Specialist and Front-line Manager in Pharma. Later he moved to IJCP, a pioneer in CME, medico marketing, healthcare communication, where he rose to become the Executive Director. At IJCP, he was responsible for identifying, developing and sustaining a mutually rewarding relationship with over 300 KOLs in all major specialties for 12 years. Many of the leading and emerging KOLs identified and nurtured by Anup Soans went on win prestigious awards like the Padmashri and Dr. B.C. Roy awards among others. OUTCOME: 1. Clear understanding of issues in KOL Management 2. Fine tuning existing KOL management programs 3. Developing a KOL management strategy and plan 4. Executing the KOL strategy WORKSHOP DURATION: 1 Day WORKSHOP MATERIAL: Delegate notes - synopsis of the workshop COORDINATOR: Knowledge Media Venturz
  • 19. Social Media E SoundoutonSocialMedia!Hundreds of Pharma professionals have joined the conversations on Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, Slideshare and Blogs on matters that impact their career and profession. Below is sampling of some of an interesting discussions took place over the past month. Join the conversation by following or linking up with our Editor on LinkedIn, Facebook and Twitter. Join the conversation. facebook.com/anupsoans
  • 20. 20 | MedicinMan May 2014 I am willing to go out on a limb here and proclaim that I believe pharmaceutical marketing is an oxymoron. The American Marketing Association defines marketing as “the activity, set of institutions, and processes for creating, communicating, delivering, and exchanging offerings that have value for customers, clients, partners, and society at large”. I believe that the operative word here is“value”. There is enough research out there to prove that cus- tomers prefer those products that they perceive to have ‘created value’for them. I must add that the value that we refer to here, very often, is intangible. It is formed and lies in the minds of customers. It is the benefit associated with the brand that appeals to the customer and is a compel- ling reason for that brand to be preferred over any other. Coca Cola, for example, projects happiness as the value it creates while Nike focuses on action. This is different from the brand value which is a financial estimate. Step back for a moment and ponder about what value you would associate with Lipitor or Humira or Avastin? Just so we are clear,“reduces LDL by x%”or“causes lesser muscle pain”or“extends life by x weeks”is not value. Those are merely product features. If you’re reading this, you probably work in the pharma- ceutical industry. If you cannot associate ONE value with these brands, do you think a lay man would? Salil Kallianpur E HAS PHARMA MARKETING FORGOTTEN THEPATIENT?Pharma marketeers will only deliver real value when the patient is at the center of every promotional effort and decision. Salil Kallianpur is Commercial Head - Classic Brands Center of Excellence, GSK. He is a well-known pharma blogger and social media enthusiast. salilkallianpur.wordpress.com
  • 21. Salil Kallianpur | Has Pharma Marketing Forgotten the Patient 21 | MedicinMan May 2014 Does that explain why Lipitor - after accruing revenues of $130 billion over 14 years and getting a lion’s share of Pfizer’s $11 billion annual marketing spend – lost 90% of its market share in the US and 70% worldwide within six months of losing its exclusivity? Also, let’s argue that in the pharma sector, value is created more easily for the corporate brand and not for individual products. Did you know that the credibility of the pharma- ceutical industry is so low that people think it should be more regulated than it currently is? So much for market- ing power and value creation. Pfizer did everything possible to create the biggest brand in the history of the industry. And they were very success- ful while it lasted. Yet, its customers dumped the brand immediately after generic copies were allowed entry. This is not the case with Lipitor alone, but with any“innovative” pharmaceutical brand. It didn’t take very long for custom- er loyalty to shift from emotional (this is the best product for my patients) to transactional (this is (not) the most affordable product for my patient). There is compelling evidence to suggest that consum- ers increasingly expect an enhanced brand experience, one that takes loyalty beyond the transaction, to deliver on emotional experiences. Relevant and timely‘value creation’is only the beginning of an emotional brand connection. That’s because there’s recognition on the part of the customer that crafting that relevant value requires detailed customer knowledge – not something gleaned from sales reports or one-day trips of product managers, pharmaceutical’s equivalent of email spam. In other words, the challenge for marketers is answering the following questions: • How well do we know our customers? • Do we know what value; customer experience and en- gagement techniques will drive customer lifetime value and incremental behavior? • What strategy and loyalty tactics make the most sense and, how long will it take our brand to reach next-level loyalty engagement? • Finally, do we have the metrics in place to measure these outcomes? However, in the face of pressure by increasingly sophis- ticated and price-sensitive customers and increased intensity in competition, executives seeking competitive advantage, are asking these questions: • How can we sustain growth in the face of patent losses, pricing pressures, increasing competition, and low- er-cost generics? “ ” Pfizer did everything possible to create the biggest brand in the history of the industry. And they were very successful while it lasted. Yet, its customers dumped the brand immediately after generic copies were allowed entry... It didn’t take very long for customer loyalty to shift from emotional (this is the best product for my patients) to transactional (this is (not) the most affordable product for my patient).
  • 22. Salil Kallianpur | Has Pharma Marketing Forgotten the Patient 22 | MedicinMan May 2014 • How should we transform our commercial organiza- tions in light of quickly evolving conditions? • How can we reduce our cost base without sacrificing critical capabilities? In my opinion, none of these questions feature the cus- tomer. Much to the contrary of company mission state- ments, pharmaceutical marketing has never had custom- ers’interests at its heart. The modality has traditionally been a one-way“push”of product-centric messages with barely any mechanism to capture meaningful suggestions or feedback from customer groups. I cannot think of a single medicine that was made because customers consis- tently asked for it. In some cases, the Indian pharmaceutical industry is an exception to the global rule. It broke away from tradition by creating fixed-dose combinations of products and probably a few variants like blister packs (as opposed to HDPE bottles). Nonetheless, Indian“innovation”focused more on making the existing better than on making the better to exist. Not that this didn’t make a difference. Cre- ating cheaper generics by reverse engineering molecules did of course; help to create access to millions of global citizens. The highly competitive and cluttered market draws out the occasional marketing practice in India that attempts to focus on creating value for customers albeit not in the best possible way. But let’s get back to the point. It is clear the industry as a whole is very inwardly focused and really does not understand its customers very well. We understand the prescribing habits of physician customers and the disease states that they work in, but neither of these are enough to qualify as deep customer understanding. I have been told by friends in the consulting field that most compa- nies cannot easily answer‘who is your customer’? Are they physicians, or payers, regulators, patients or wholesalers?’ Which begs the question: If a trillion-dollar industry has survived for so long without bothering too much about what its customers want, is it really so bad? Maybe not! The industry – reactive as it is – did what it took to make the best of the external environment. As the R&D engine chugged and produced blockbuster after next, there was really no reason to worry about products that lost exclu- sivity in a regulatory environment which supported mo- nopolistic practices. As a significantly different business environment challenges the prosperity of the industry, will this change? While the pharmaceutical industry definitely lags behind other sectors in driving lifetime customer value, that trend is changing. “Much to the contrary of company mission statements, pharmaceutical marketing has never had customers’ interests at its heart. The modality has traditionally been a one-way “push” of product-centric messages with barely any mechanism to capture meaningful suggestions or feedback from customer groups. I cannot think of a single medicine that was made because customers consistently asked for it. ”
  • 23. Salil Kallianpur | Has Pharma Marketing Forgotten the Patient 23 | MedicinMan May 2014 Lifetime customer value extends marketing’s role past initial brand recognition and customer acquisition to one that drives ongoing customer dialogue, conversion and retention. Recent appointments of a Chief Design Officer (CDO) at Johnson & Johnson and a Chief Patient Officer (CPO) at Sanofi indicate that Big Pharma seems willing to take its customers more seriously than ever before. Big Pharma must indeed ensure that these senior appoint- ments work to bring the patients voice into the organi- zation at a level where it can make a difference. The CPO must be a leadership point to inspire and prioritize patient interactions. The CPO must start with a blank canvass to identify customers’needs through the lens of the compa- ny’s products, and see where services can be built around the products to enhance peoples’lives — their ability to access the products, information and tools that can boost self-care. This expands the company’s influence“beyond the pill.”Sanofi even hired a top FMCG executive as its CEO in India, signaling a willingness to break away from all things traditionally pharma. Pharmaceutical marketing has traditionally attracted peo- ple with a strong scientific background, with focus on the product and the science. Even today, competitive differ- entiation in pharmaceuticals has relied on using scientific data relating to product efficacy, safety and tolerability to address obvious unmet medical needs. Now as the industry understands the importance of engaging with customers, marketers rely must begin to ask questions that really matter to patients:“What is it like to suffer from this problem? How does it affect your ability to communi- cate, your relationships with friends and loved ones, your hobbies, working life and aspirations?”The adoption of technology and multi-channel communication tools may have been in response to dropping physician access and cost-containment measures, but the technique can surely find meaningful deployment to harness valuable custom- er insights that may create path-breaking products and services. It probably all boils down to the kind of environment we operate in. If we are allowed monopoly, we don’t need to build brand equity. But, what if we aren’t allowed that? How can we take anything for granted in a world as uncer- tain and chaotic as the one we operate in? Pharma, like all other sectors, will have to take its brand building seriously. One fervently hopes that senior leaders such as the Chief Patient Officer lead the creation of significant value to cus- tomers and facilitate the transition of pharma marketing from an oxymoron to a tautology. -SK “ ” It probably all boils down to the kind of environment we operate in. If we are allowed monopoly, we don’t need to build brand equity. But, what if we aren’t allowed that? Pharma, like all other sectors, will have to take its brand building seriously. One fervently hopes that senior leaders such as the Chief Patient Officer lead the creation of significant value to customers and facilitate the transition of pharma marketing from an oxymoron to a tautology.
  • 24. Knowledge for the Medical Rep Series Prescription drugs are medicinal substances which are prescribed by a doctor and bought at a pharmacy and regulated by an authority like FDA. Over the Counter (OTC) drugs are medications which can be purchased without any prescription from the doctor. All medicinal products that are not included in the list of‘prescription-only drugs’are considered as OTC in India. DIFFERENCEBETWEENOTC&PRESCRIPTIONMARKETING E Prescription Marketing OTC Marketing Target audience Doctors of various specialties Consumers Decision maker Doctors who prescribes the medication , however patients who are prescribed medicines can also be a decision maker at the point of purchase based on factors like cost of medication and pharmacist recommendation Consumers are the decision makers Market research Research is done with an objective to understand doctor’s prescription behaviour, molecule usage and attitude for a category of molecules /therapy area Research is done to gain consumer insights which when creatively communicated leads to an inspirational OTC advertising Communication Communication talks about molecules advantages, its benefits and superiority to previous class of molecules/ enhancement in drug delivery system/ convenience over other brands. Communication talks about consumers, product benefits Objective of the marketing communication Objective of the marketing is to influence and penetrate the mind the Doctors/KOLs for brand building Objective of the marketing is to penetrate the mind of consumers and associate the brand with their specific needs Communication aims at creating a favourable image in front of the doctors which helps in prescription generation and revenue generation for the organisation Aims to build a memorable and convincing advertisement for the brand so that the brand can be recalled at the point of purchase Channels of communication Sales team -Medical representatives are mostly employed by the pharmaceutical firms.With advancement of technology the promotion is expanding through virtual detailing and webinars Channels of communications with target audience are wide - Broadcast Media (TV, Radio), Print media, (Magazines, Newspapers) Outdoor media, Indoor promotions, Internet promotion etc Other channels include advertisements in Medical journals, books, showcasing products in conferences etc Message delivery and dilution Message is communicated through medical reps which can lead to message distortions and key messages getting diluted many times Message is conveyed directly to consumers through various channels (TV, Radio,Web etc) with no chances of getting key message diluted Advertising expenses 65-70% expenses are towards field force cost A& P expenses are very high in the initial 2-3 years of launch. 65-70% expenses are in advertising /10-15% field cost ROI It can take short time since doctors are aware about the basic molecules and any brand who is active in promotion, creating favourable activities have a higher chance of getting returns on the investment (Think only branded generics) ROI usually takes a long time since building brand awareness and creating a desire for the product takes a long time. Product launches There are numerous product launches in a year in prescription marketing with a new division emerging every year in many pharmaceutical companies. For ex; 1700 new product were launches in 2012 in Indian Pharma Market. Very few brands are launched in the market which can break the clutter and penetrate the mind of consumers. Price Regulations Prices are governed by NPPA. No such regulations exists however pricing is brand specific which is governed by competitive scenario. Unless the brand has significant USP, the prices remain in the competitive bandwidth Legal recognition Legally all prescription drugs fall under Schedules H and X No specific legal recognition in India. Kumud Kandpal is a Management Associate- International Marketing at Bioplus Life Sciences
  • 25. A new book by Renie McClay published by ASTD Press is apt for the global executive with a local vision. “The Art of Modern SalesManagement”has12chapters,each writtenbyaleaderinthefieldfromaround theworld. Renie McClay, MA, CPLP, has been a dynamic performance improvement professional for 20 years. She has been successful in sales, management, and learning and performance roles at several Fortune 500 companies (Kraft, Pactiv, and Novartis). Founder of Inspired Learning LLC, she continues to bring her passion and practical approach to all project work. Inspired Learning LLC does design and delivery of energetic programs and projects around the world. Buy on Amazon. Download a free chapter of the book here. The Art of Modern Sales Management is a must read for any global sales leader. It's practical, relevant, and grounded in the experience of seasoned sales professionals who make a significant difference in the organizations that they serve. This book includes many useful tips and actionable ideas that any sales leader can use. --Kimo Kippen, Chief Learning Officer, Hilton Worldwide Renie has done a great job of selecting thought leaders that speak to the challenges of selling in our new, connected world. I absolutely love the framework of the book and found myself skipping from one chapter to another based on what I thought was most relevant to the problems I am most interested in solving today. This book is a must for anyone that understands that front-sales management is tomorrow’s competitive advantage. --Pat Martin, VP of Sales, Estes Express Renie is on top of her game again and brings the A Team to the world of Modern Sales Management. With the explosion of social media and the immediacy of shared experience for buyers and sellers, The Art of Modern Sales Management is a practical guide to navigating these changing realities, and the action plans offered provide tools to ensure the best opportunity for success. If you have a leadership role within the sales organization, you need this book as a guide and resource. --Gary Summy, Director of Business Development Global Accounts Operations, Xerox Corporation