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Hospital HR Challenges by Dr. Nagendra Swamy Manipal Hospitals
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Hospital HR Challenges by Dr. Nagendra Swamy Manipal Hospitals

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Hospital - HR Challenges

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Hospital HR Challenges by Dr. Nagendra Swamy Manipal Hospitals Hospital HR Challenges by Dr. Nagendra Swamy Manipal Hospitals Presentation Transcript

  •                                HR  CHALLENGES  IN  HEALTHCARE                                                                                  DR  NAGENDRA  SWAMY                                                                                                                                    PRESIDENT                                                                                                                                    MANPAL  HEALTH  ENTERPRISES                                                                                                
  • CHALLENGES & OPPORTUNITIES- HEALTHCARE IN INDIA•  CHALLENGES OPPORTUNITIES•  Affordability of Quality Healthcare. •  Recognition as an Industry: Transition Currently ~3% of population are from “healthcare” as a Social covered by Insurance/Third Party Responsibility to “healthcare” as a Funding business.•  Accessibility to Quality Healthcare, •  Tap Domestic Potential: Increased especially in rural areas Health Insurance Cover, improving•  Brain Drain: Availability of trained Domestic affordability Doctors / Nurses / Paramedics •  Integrated Urban-Rural Presence: Tele-•  Intense Competition: Entry of private players, and MNCs Medicine and integrated networks of care to help tap the large rural•  Govt. Spending(<1% of GDP): Low healthcare spending by the population government and increased load •  Medical Process Out-Sourcing: Clinical towards the payment of Salaries (80%) Research, Tele-Radiology, Medical•  Ailing Government Infrastructure: Transcription etc. healthcare with high maintenance •  Medical Tourism: International costs community recognizing India as a quality care provider
  • Healthcare Snapshot Total Healthcare Market Size US $ 21.3 billion Pharmaceuticals Healthcare Services US $ 4.15 billion US $ 17.15 billion Hospitals Services & Practioners: Medical Eqpnts & Consumables US $ 13.10 billion US $ 1.35 billion Medical Software Medical Insurance US $ 1.45 billion US $ 82.90 million Healthcare Consultancy US $ 41.45 millionu  Traditionally, a social sector with high Govt. roleu  Dominated by Small time players in the Private Sectoru  Growing @ 14-16 % per annum
  • SUMMARY: INDIAN HEALTHCARE MARKET•  Indian healthcare a US $ 35 billion industry, expected to reach US $ 75 billion by 2012 and US $ 150 billion by 2017.•  Will grow at the rate of 10-12% over the next few years.•  WHO Recommends India to add 80,000 hospital beds a year for the next 5-8 years to meet the demands of healthcare sector•  4 MN PEOPLE ARE EMPLOYED, MAKING IT ONE OF THE LARGEST SERVICE SECTORS IN THE ECONOMY GOING UP TO 9 MN IN 2015•  Clinical trials have the potential to become a US$ 1 billion industry by 2010 and the health services outsourcing sector has the potential to grow to US$ 7.4 billion by 2012, from US$ 3.7 billion in 2006.•  Private Equity funds are expected to invest at least US$ 1 billion in the healthcare in the next five years.
  • SUMMARY: INDIAN HEALTHCARE MARKET•  With only 10% of the Indian urban population covered by health insurance, the sector has growth potential of US$ 5.75 billion by 2010•  In fact, 84% of hospital beds are in urban areas, whereas 75% of the population still resides in rural villages.•  Medical tourism will be a US$ 2 billion industry by 2012, growing at 25-30% annually. In 2007, India treated 450,000 foreign patients and ranked 2nd in medical tourism globally.•  The total healthcare market with Pharma will be US$ 53 – 73 billion (6.2 – 8.5 per cent of the GDP) in the next 5 yrs•  The Indian middle class estimated at 300 million has strong Purchase power.Ø  According to Ernst & Young, the Indian medical equipment industry was US$ 2.6 billion in 2006 and is growing at 15 per cent and expected to reach US$ 4.5 billion by 2012. Only 35 per cent is accounted for by the domestic sector, while the rest is imported
  • Value of Healthcare Market 300000 200000 100000 2005 2009 2012*Figures in Rs crore* ProjectedSource: Healthcare services in India:2012, the path ahead. ASSOCHAM-YES Bank, 2009; McKinsey 2007
  • CHANGING – DISEASE PROFILE      Expected to Increase Expected  to  Decrease     •  Lower  Respiratory  Tract   Transition from •  I.H.D Infec3on   Infectious & •  COPD •  Diarrhea  diseases   Nutritional •  CVA •  Perinatal  Condi3ons   Diseases to •  Diabetes •  Measles   Chronic & •  Cancer Lifestyle related •  Road Traffic Accident •  Malaria   diseases •  HIV •  PEM   •  Psychiatric Conditions •  Anemia  Source: www.cia.gov - Fact Book UK /USA 2007
  • CHANGING – DISEASE PROFILEUSD 237 Billion in National Income for India Loss due to CNCD in2015Globally over 36 million will die of this epidemic- 80% death is lowerand middle income groups- amounting to 44% of premature deathworld wide.This is double the number of deaths dues to infectious diseases.- WHO report- FOCUS ON PREVENTIVE TO CURATIVE:•  Life style modification•  Early Diagnosis•  Ancillary & Auxiliary Therapies•  Prophylaxis•  Utilization of Genetic & Biotechnology
  • MARKET REALITY•  India has only 0.7 beds per 1000 people in contrast to the average of 3.3 beds per 1000 in other countries.•  The demand completely eclipses capacity. India needs 80,000 beds each year for the next 8- 10 years at Rs 50,000 cr per year.•  Double the number of doctors from 0.7 million to 1.5 million•  Triple the number of nurses from 0.8 to 2.5 million.•  Four times the number of paramedics from 2.5 to 10 million.•  60% of the 15,393 hospitals and 80% of all qualified doctors are in private sector
  • MANPOWER GAP
  • HEALTHCARE TODAY Industrial Age Medicine toInformation Age Medicine
  • UNIQUE CHALLENGES OFHEALTHCARE ( HOSPITALS)
  • Healthcare Today Reach Cures Ego Compassion Emotions & FeelingsFamily & Friends Patient Friendliness Labor intensive Cost Super Specialty Technological Advancements Hope Continuum of Care Complex Quality Health Tourism Anxiety Expense Commercialization Healing Managed Care Telemedicine
  • HEALTH CARE TODAY(Spectrum of Skill Sets Involved in Service Delivery) Attendants Counselors Receptionist Super Specialist Security Staff Technicians OT Staff Primary Physician Housekeeping OPD Secretaries Dietician Anesthetist Lift Operators Pt. Care Coordinators Admissions Radiologist Canteen Admin Manager Nursing Physiotherapist Room Boys Pharmacist PRO Cashier Jr. Doctors LOW MEDIUM Sr. Management • Socio-Economic Status • Socio-Economic Status • Education Levels • Education Levels HIGH • Intellectual Capability • Intellectual Capability • Socio-Economic Status • Education Levels • Intellectual Capability Healthcare Organization Complex interaction PATIENT / RELATIVES LOW MEDIUM HIGH • Socio-Economic Status • Socio-Economic Status • Socio-Economic Status • Education Levels • Education Levels • Education Levels • Intellectual Capability • Intellectual Capability • Intellectual Capability
  • CHANGING TRENDS Transformation of Patients’ Status, Hospitals’ Attitude and Doctors’ ProfessionPatients Customers Guests Blood RelativesHospitals Hospitality Homely CareProfessionGeneralist Specialist Super specialists Sub Specialist
  • CHANGING EGO LEVELS Ego Levels vs. Criticality of OrgansEgo Levels of Health Professionals Anatomy handled
  • CHANGING TRENDS-BEHAVIORAL•  Doctors –  More Communicative, Humility –  Doctor–Patient Relationship –  Hospital-Doctor Relationships –  Encouraging Second Opinion –  Integrated approach- Respect all systems –  Patient Safety / Medical Errors•  Patients –  Patient Education and Charter of Right –  More Demanding•  Nursing, Paramedical & Administrative Staff –  Equipped with Tech Tools –  Care Beyond Nursing
  • PREPARING THE 21ST CENTURY GLOBAL HEALTHCARE WORKFORCE To meet the growing global demands of caring for the increasing numbers of patients with chronic conditions, we need to develop a new approach to training. A different set of competenciesThe five basic competenciesPatient centred carePartneringQuality improvementInformation and communication technologyPublic health perspective
  • QUALITY AND QUANTITY OF HUMAN RESOURCE TO ENHANCE•  The Govt Policy must encourage PG Courses so that Hospitals meeting certain minimum criteria can offer these courses with relaxation in terms of restrictions. ( Fellowship / DNB)•  Qualitative Educational Institutions to be commenced.•  Continued medical education (CMEs) for medical, nursing and para-medical professionals,•  Mandatory credentialing of Medical Professionals while recruiting.•  The current compulsory rural stint for medical professionals.•  Huge Health cities/ medi-cities will induce employment and even provide human resources through education facilities.•  To have 2nd line – Health Assistants to assist Nursing in non clinical work and Physician assistant programmes•  To give importance to Healthcare management programmes and make them popular career option.•  Staff for accreditation programmes- NABH / NABL/ JCI / ISO etc
  • FEW DAUNTING CHALLENGES•  ACUTE SHORTAGE OF QUALIFIED AND TRAINED STAFF•  GETTING REPLACEMENT IN TIME – SERVICE GETS EFFECTED•  UP COMING NEW FACILITIES TAKING AWAY TRAINED STAFF WHICH RESULTS IN REPLACEMENT BY UNTRAINED STAFF- GAPS IN SERVICE.•  MOST OF THE CONSULTANTS ARE ON CONTRACT, NON- EMPLOYEE STATUS WHICH MAKES IT DIFFICULT TO MANAGE THEM.•  ABSENCE OF BENCH MARKING FOR STAFF : BED RATIO•  QUALITY / PATEINET SAFETY / MEDICAL ERRORS – PROACTIVE REPORTING.•  INCREASED MEDICO-LEGAL RISK, COMPLIANCE TO STATUTORY OBLIGATIONS.•  IR ISSUES AND LABOR UNION ACTIVITIES.•  VICARIOUS RESPONSIBILITY OF CONTRACT EMPLOYEES.
  • THE REAL CHALLENGE IS ……..
  • MHB – Awards and Accolades NABH  
  • Recognition & Awards 2010   2009   2008   2007   2006  2004   2005  Ranked 1st in Bangalore for the 7th consecutive year by ‘The Week’ among ‘India’s Best Hospitals’
  • Sources:McKinsey report – Technopark- E&Y – KPMG- WHO-Cygnus -ASSOCHAM-YES Bank- MOH- CRIS-INFAC-IRDA-HOSMAC-NIPER- Netscribe-FIICITHANK YOU VERY MUCH FOR YOUR PATIENCE - Dr Nagendra Swamy