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Mapping of University Presses in India: Pattern of Knowledge Production and Dissemination
 

Mapping of University Presses in India: Pattern of Knowledge Production and Dissemination

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Presented at International Conference on Framing Asian Studies: Geopolitics, Institutions and Networks; 18-20 November 2013; at IIAS, Leiden, Netherlands

Presented at International Conference on Framing Asian Studies: Geopolitics, Institutions and Networks; 18-20 November 2013; at IIAS, Leiden, Netherlands

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    Mapping of University Presses in India: Pattern of Knowledge Production and Dissemination Mapping of University Presses in India: Pattern of Knowledge Production and Dissemination Presentation Transcript

    • Mapping of University Presses in India: Pattern of Knowledge Production and Dissemination Anup Kumar Das CSSP, SSS, JNU, India Presented at Conference on Framing Asian Studies: Geopolitics, Institutions and Networks 18-20 November 2013 at IIAS, Leiden, Netherlands
    • Program
    • Conference Program Framing Asian Studies: Geopolitics, Institutions and Networks 18 20 November 2013 Venue: BplusC (Chapel Hall), Oude Vest 45 (entrance via Hazewindsteeg), Leiden Conference Organizers International Institute for Asian Studies (IIAS), Leiden, the Netherlands Institute of Southeast Asian Studies (ISEAS), Singapore Institute of Southeast Asian Studies www.iias.nl www.iseas.edu.sg
    • Monday 18 November 2013 Contested Idea of Asia 0900 1000 Welcome Address Dr. Phillippe Peycam, Director of the International Institute for Asian Studies, the Netherlands Dr. Ooi Kee Beng, Deputy Director of the Institute of Southeast Asian Studies, Singapore Dr. Albert Tzeng, IIAS ISEAS Postdoctoral Fellow and Conference Convenor Coffee Break 1030 1200, Western Discourses on Asia Chair: Carolien Stolte, Lecturer, Institute for History, Leiden University, the Netherlands From Oriental Studies to Asian Studies: The Metamorphosis of Western Mind in Framing Asia Maitreyee Choudhury, Centre for Himalayan Studies, North Bengal University, India Asian Studies in Portugal Nuno Canas Mendes, Orient Institute, School of Social and Political Sciences – University of Lisbon, Portugal Geopolitical and Social Framings of Australia’s ‘Asia Literacy’ Kirrilee Hughes, Australian National University, Australia Lunch Break 1330 1500, Asian Discourses on Asia Chair: Young Chul Cho, Korea Foundation Visiting Profesor, International Institute for Asian Studies and Leiden University Institute for Area Studies, the Netherlands Colonialism, Cosmopolitanism, and the Indian Discourse on Asia Krishna Sen, Department of English, University of Calcutta, India Knowing Asia: Why is there no ‘Asian Studies’ in India Brij Mohan Tankha, Institute of Chinese Studies, Delhi, India Asia as Method: Case Study of Kuan Hsing Chen (1957 ) Abby Hsian huan Huang, Research Master in Asian Studies, Leiden University, the Netherlands Coffee Break 1530 1730, Contested Geographical Framing Chair: Yih Jye Hwang, Assistant Professor of International Relations, Leiden University College the Hague, the Netherlands Cartographic Illustration and the Ongoing Geopolitical Construction of Asia and South Asia William Louis Richter, Kansas State University, United States Pivotal Projections: Geographical Fulcrums of History and the Framing of Asia in the Writings of Halford Mackinder and Owen Lattimore Hasan Karrar, Lahore University of Management Sciences, Pakistan Area Studies, Asian Studies, and the Pacific Basin Shane Barter, Pacific Basin Research Center / Soka University of America, United States The Sea of Changes Shifting Trajectories Across the Sea of Bengal Jayati Bhattacharya, South Asian Studies Programme, National University of Singapore, Singapore 1800, Conference dinner
    • Tuesday 19 November 2013 Colonial Legacies and Institutions 0900 1200 Colonial Legacies Chair: Ward Keeler, Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology, The University of Texas at Austin, USA / Fellow, International Institute for Asian Studies, the Netherlands Science and Practice: the Colonial Legacy of ‘Improvement’ in Indian Agricultural Knowledge Sanjukta Ghosh, Independent Researcher, United Kingdom Anthropology in India From Colonial Legacy to Post Colonial Identity Sekh Rahim Mondal, University of North Bengal, India Coffee Break Malays as Natives: Conceptualization of Malays in British Malaya Yuji Tsuboi, Oriental Library, Japan Classifying the Chinese in Diaspora: Southeast Asian Chinese in Colonial Eyes Huei Ying Kuo, Dept. of Sociology, Johns Hopkins University, United States Remembering Empire: Apotheosis, Atrocity and National Memories of the Dutch East India Company Eric Jones, Southeast Asian History, Northern Illinois University, United States Lunch Break 1330 1500, Foundations and Institutes Chair: Albert Tzeng, IIAS ISEAS Fellow, International Institute for Asian Studies, the Netherlands Institute of Pacific Relations,1923 57: Asia’s First International NGO Stephen R. MacKinnon, Arizona State University, United States American Philanthropy and Social Science in Early Coldwar Japan Masato Karashima, Kyoto University, Japan Culture as a Tool for Soft Diplomacy: The Curious Case of the ASEAN Cultural Fund and other Japanese initiatives in Southeast Asia David Ocón Fernández, Independent Arts Manager and Consultant / International University of Catalonia (UIC), Spain Coffee Break 1530 1730, Archive and Publishers Chair: Elisa Ganser, Fellow, International Institute for Asian Studies, the Netherlands Notes in the Margins: Music, Magic and Institutional Knowledge Julia Byl, King's College London, United Kingdom From Manuscript Hunts to Collections, Catalogues and Oriental Institutes: Representing Indigenous Knowledge of India at the Turn of the Centuries Cezary Galewicz, Institute of Oriental Studies, Jagiellonian University, Poland Building a Bridge between China and the West in Contemporary China Studies Suisheng Zhao, University of Denver, United States Mapping of University Presses in India: Pattern of Knowledge Production and Dissemination Anup Kumar Das, Centre for Studies in Science Policy, Jawaharlal Nehru University, India
    • Wednesday 20 November 2013 Inter Regional Gazes 0900 1200, On Southeast/ South Asia Chair: Siobhan Campbell, Fellow, International Institute for Asian Studies, the Netherlands From Geertz to Ricklefs: The Changing Discourse on the Javanese Religion and its Wider Contexts Riwamto Tirtosudarmo, Research Center for Society and Culture, Indonesian Institute of Sciences, Indonesia The ‘Politics’ of Scholarship and Journalism on Cambodia Gea D.M. Wijers, Cambodia Research Group, VU University Amsterdam, the Netherlands Coffee break Institutes of Southeast Asia in China Jean Berlie, Centre for Greater China Studies, Hong Kong Institute of Education, Hong Kong Southeast Asian Studies in Russia: The Agents against Structural Limits Ekaterina Koldunova, Moscow State Institute of International Affairs, MGIMO University, Russia Approaching Asia from Outside the Establishment: Bodies and frameworks of India studies in Soviet Lithuania Valdas Jaskunas, Centre of Oriental Studies, Vilnius University, Lithuania Lunch Break 1300 1500, On China Chair: Frank Pieke, Leiden University Institute for Area Studies, the Netherlands The Rise of China and the Framing of “Asian Studies” in Latin America & Caribbean Gonzalo S Paz, Georgetown University, United States Study of China's Foreign Policy in Post Soviet Russia Vladimir Portyakov, Institute of Far Eastern Studies, Russian Academy of Sciences, Russia The status of China studies in the Arab World Mohammad Selim, Department of Political Science, Kuwait University, Kuwait Interplay between Local Embededness, Geopolitics and Knowledge: Genealogies of Knowledge Production of Chinese Studies in its Neighbourhood Claire Seungeun Lee, Asia Research Institute and the Department of Sociology, National University of Singapore, Singapore Coffee Break
    • 1530 1700, On Taiwan and Japan Chair: Shelley Ching yu Hsieh, Visiting Professor, Taiwanese Chair of Chinese Studies, International Institute for Asian Studies, the Netherlands Studying “Taiwan Studies:” The Evolution and the Transformations of a Multi Disciplinary Sub field, 1600 CE to 2011CE Murray A. Rubinstein, Weatherhead East Asian Institute, Columbia University / Baruch College of the City University of New York / City College of New York, United States Taiwan Studies in the United States and Europe Hardina Ohlendorf, Centre of Taiwan Studies, SOAS, University of London, United Kingdom Japanese Studies in Comparative Perspective: How are Area/Regional Studies Constructed? Eyal Ben Ari, Kinneret College on the Sea of Galilee, Israel 1700 1730, Closing Remarks
    • to allocate new funds for a project envisaged as holding out a promise for “many … uncontemplated practical uses.” The project, unprecedented and never repeated again, added substantially to a new frame for the Asian Studies in general and Indology in particular. It continued and aimed at confirming the then conceptualized role of Sanskrit philology as a major and dominating scholarly paradigm centered on written material artifacts in the shape of manuscripts conceived as representing the vast and mostly neglected treasure of the knowledge of the past. The finds and reports of the scholars involved in the project helped in developing new libraries, supplied ideas for descriptive catalogues and research Institutes thus framing a part of Asian studies in a way that must have seemed at the moment to be holding good forever. The paradigm and its historiographical presumptions proved soon to be seriously challenged. Suisheng Zhao, University of Denver, United States Building a Bridge between China and the West in Contemporary China Studies: This paper presents how the Journal of Contemporary China (JCC) as a leading journal of China studies founded in early 1990s has tried to incorporate yet two new developments in the field of China studies. One is the integration of the traditional sinology into the contemporary social sciences research. For about a half century, most scholars of China studies were influenced heavily by the so called sinology tradition that was started in Europe during the 19th century. This tradition takes China as an isolated and unique case and emphasizes its unique historical and culture while ignored the social science methodology and comparative approaches in the study of China. This situation has been changed along the development of behavior revolution in the Western academic world as more and more scholars of China have been trained in vigorous social sciences departments. They have therefore been able to apply contemporary social sciences approach toward the study of contemporary China. The second new development is the gradual integration of Chinese scholarship into mainstream international scholarship of contemporary China studies. Until very recently, very few scholars in Greater China were able to make serious contributions to the Western scholarly studies of contemporary China due not only to differences in academic training, but also—perhaps more importantly—due to ideological constraints. This situation has been changed in recent years. Western studies of China have been greatly enriched in the last decade by the contribution of more and more of the Chinese scholars who are in an equal position to conduct sophisticated dialogues with their Western counterparts. This new development is a result of more and more Western trained Chinese scholars returning to their homeland and an increasing number of indigenous Chinese scholars receiving rigorous academic training. More importantly, Chinese scholars have explored the contemporary era with fewer constraints than in the past. As a result, a greater number of Chinese scholars have been able to publish their research in Western journals. It is indeed impressive that these works by Chinese scholars have provided not only valuable empirical data (raw materials) but also in depth analysis (paradigms). These are challenges that may help lay a foundation for establishing a new standard for scholarship in the twenty first century that will demonstrate competence in integrating the analytic literature of Chinese and Western discourses. Anup Kumar Das, Centre for Studies in Science Policy, Jawaharlal Nehru University, India Mapping of University Presses in India: Pattern of Knowledge Production and Dissemination Academic presses in India have long standing in production of knowledge and knowledge dissemination to worldwide learned communities. Century old universities in India, which were started during colonial period, had established their own university presses to publish research monographs and other publications, for engaging with an extended scholarly community, and outreaching to general audience of educated citizens. Some of these university presses in India are
    • now becoming extinct as university authorities find them non functional or dead entity with no possibility of resource mobilization. However, few universities and academic institutions are still maintaining their university presses. The advanced studies institutions in India, such as Asiatic Society of Calcutta, Indian Institute of Advanced Study of Shimla, have very rich experience of academic publishing. They have created a space for mutual learning through their prestigious fellowship programmes and postdoctoral research studies. Their interdisciplinary, trans disciplinary and multi disciplinary approaches have been appreciated by worldwide learned communities. Fusion and handholding of academic disciplines have created an environment of mutual learning, benefiting researchers understanding others’ disciplines. On the other hand, Visva Bharati Publishing – a university press in West Bengal, have been publishing Noble laureate Rabindranath Tagore’s literary works in Bengali and few other languages. They also have strong focus on Tagore studies, Tagore’s philosophy, comparative literature, arts and humanities. In recent time, we also see the death of university presses in India. Many university presses were shut down that implicate low interest of academic communities in sustaining this model of knowledge production. Some university presses only publish text books for their undergraduate or postgraduate students. A declining trend in publishing new monographs is recorded. Low technology penetration, particularly ICT, has made them virtually non visible in the cyberspace. This constructs a disconnect with worldwide academic communities. On the other hand, some sustaining academic presses have embraced ICT tools for outreaching wider academic communities through cyberspace with their new academic titles. They also collaborate with established commercial publishers exploring co publishing option. New collaborations have helped in regaining confidence of best academic minds in publishing their books through these age old not for profit academic presses. This paper will narrate present status of university presses in India, and how they are integrated with their prestigious fellowship programmes as knowledge dissemination channel. This paper will analyze global visibility and availability of produced knowledge through institutional and external web catalogues, e commerce sites, book reviews, citations and different language editions. Riwamto Tirtosudarmo, Research Center for Society and Culture, Indonesian Institute of Sciences, Indonesia From Geertz to Ricklefs: The changing discourse on the Javanese religion and its wider contexts Java and the Javanese have been studied extensively by Western scholars. The burgeoning literatures on Java and the Javanese only prove how attractive this place and its people to Western scholars. One aspect of the Javanese that continue enchanted is their religion and religiosity. The Javanese embraced all religion that brought to Java and we noticed the changing dominating religion in Java. This paper investigates the study of Javanese religion by the Western scholars since the 1950as to the early 2010s. The seven long decades of endurance deserves an explanation why the Javanese religion continues to attract the Western scholars? This paper is basically a survey of literatures and will began its analysis on “The Religion of Java” (1960) by the American anthropologist, Clifford Geertz, and ended on “Islamization and Its Opponents in Java” (2013) by Australian historian, Merle Ricklefs. In between those two books a close reading will be conducted to books by several scholars that focusing their study on the Javanese religion. The wider contexts of global politics from “Cold War” in the 1950s to “War on Terror” in the recent years will become the framework in the analysis of the book. The paper will shed some lights on the way in which the western scholarship have perceived and constructed the discourse on the Javanese religion.