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LAST 2013 - Use games to innovate
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LAST 2013 - Use games to innovate

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Ban the boring one hour requirements gathering and design meetings forever ! …

Ban the boring one hour requirements gathering and design meetings forever !

Agile teams can use InnovationGames to engage with their customers in a fun way and build better products together from the great new insights gained from serious games.

Published in Business , Technology
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  • 1. How can we better …. 1.  Collaborate with customers? 2.  Collect requirements? 3.  Design our solutions? 4.  Prioritise features? 5.  Evolve design? 6.  Build innovation in? 7.  Satisfy our customers?
  • 2. Universe of Innovation
  • 3. Adapteted  from  Greg  Satell  HBR  -­‐    h5p://blogs.hbr.org/cs/2013/02/before_you_innovate_ask_the_ri.html     Bitcoin     NeHlix   Amazon     Google     Apple   Apple       IBM     Labs  
  • 4. Remember, we’re talking Innovation not Invention ! Invention is more about thinking up cool stuff. Innovation is successfully applying inventions in practice to become something valuable. Adapted  from  h5p://iwww.innovaOonexcellence.com  
  • 5. Collaboration is a recursive process where two or more people or groups work together in an intersection of common goals — for example, an intellectual endeavor that is creative in nature—by sharing knowledge, learning and building consensus
  • 6. Kapow ! h5p://www.innovaOongames.com   Let  the  Games   begin  !  
  • 7. Innovation Games® are serious games that solve a wide range of product management and development problems across the development lifecycle. They are played: •  with customers & internal stakeholders •  online or in-person •  within or across organizational units •  in single or multi-game formats  
  • 8. Manage     strategic     roadmaps   Iden1fy     New  Products   Determine  Product   Interac1ons   Train     Sales  Teams   Priori1ze   Features   Improve   Marke1ng     Messages   Priori1ze   Project     PorAolio   Iden1fy  Product   Enhancements   Priori1ze  User  Ideas   Priori1ze   Strategic  Projects  
  • 9. Not  Work   (Leisure)   Pleasure   Work   Play   Not-­‐Play   External  Goals  Internal  Goals   Not-­‐Pleasure   Adapted  from  h5p://it.coe.uga.edu/~lrieber/resources/blanchardmodel.gif  
  • 10. Innovation requires a process, others to collaborate with, and tools…
  • 11. From Idea (or problem)… … to Action (Done)
  • 12. 20  
  • 13. Prune the Product Tree Goal: Understand the evolution of your offering. •  Draw  a  tree  to  represent  growth  of  your   offering   •  Add  current  ideas  from  your  roadmap  as   leaves  and  apples.   •  5  to  8  invited  stakeholders  shape  the  “growth”   of  your  offering.   •  Captures  very  rich  informaOon  about   percepOons  of  the  future,  Oming  of  new   concepts,  balance,  and  relaOonships  among   ideas    
  • 14. Speed Boat Goal: Identify Pain Points and Issues •  Draw  a  speed  boat  or  a  yacht  and  explain  that   it  needs  to  go  as  fast  as  possible,  but  shallow   and  deep  anchors  hold  it  back.   •  IdenOfy  the  problem  and  phrase  it  as  a   quesOon.   •  5  to  8  stakeholders  add  anchors  that  keep  the   boat  back.   •  A^erwards  they  talk  about  the  problems,   issues  and  risks,  and  also  start  exploring  what   it  would  take  to  remove  anchors.    
  • 15. Spider Web •  Individually  or  teams  of  5  to  8  people.   •  Place  something  in  the  center  –  you  or  a   stakeholder  or  customer  of  your  so^ware.   •  IdenOfy  stakeholders  that  are  directly  connected  to   the  center.   •  Draw  stronger  or  thinner  lines  to  show  the  strength   of  the  relaOonship.   •  Connect  them  together  –  move  out  to  the  edge  of   the  web.   •  Provides  insights  about  stakeholders,  users  and   customer  networks.   Goal: Explore Relationships
  • 16. h5p://www.flickr.com/photos/innovgames/8000409711/in/photostream/  
  • 17. Product Box •  Individually  or  teams  of  2-­‐5  people     •  Look  at  a  breakfast  serial  box  or  so^ware  box   •  IdenOfy  the  “product”  to  develop   •  Provide  lots  of  colorful  staOonary   •  Let  creaOvity  reign   •  Teams  or  individuals  present  their  product  boxes   and  talks  about  the  “features”   •  Collect  the  boxes  to  develop  a  backlog  of  great     features.   Goal: Design Product Features
  • 18. Hot Tub •  Teams  of  5  to  8  people.   •  Observers  and  parOcipants.   •  IdenOfy  weird  and  outrageous  features  as  part  of   your  so^ware  i.e.  “USB  knife  sharpener”.   •  Present  the  ideas  to  the  parOcipants.   •  Let  them  discuss  the  feature.   •  Observe  their  reacOons  and  where  the  discussion  is   leading.   Goal: Outrageously Innovative
  • 19. Buy a Feature •  A  list  of  12-­‐20  items  (features  or  projects)  are   described  in  terms  of  benefits  and  cost   •  5  to  8  invited  stakeholders  given     limited  “budget”,  must  reach     consensus  on  projects  to  “buy”   •  Captures  very  rich  informaOon  about  customer   moOvaOons,  trade-­‐offs,  objecOons,  actual  collecOve   needs   In-­‐person   •  Provides  rich  opportunity  for  “new”  ideas   Online   •  Captures  data  for  sophisOcated  analysis  of   preferences   Goal: Prioritize Features
  • 20. Start your day Remember the future •  Teams  of  5  to  8  people.   •  Use  a  future  point  with    Ome,  weeks,  months  scale.   •  Present  a  real  life  scenario  experience  somewhere   in  the  future  i.e.  using  your  soluOon  on  a  daily,   weekly,  monthly  basis.   •  ParOcipants  idenOfy  experiences  that  unfolds  on   the  Omeline.   •  Items  can  be  linked  together  to  show  relaOonships.   •  MulOple  tracks  can  be  added  by  mulOple  teams  and   connected  together.   Goal: Develop use case roadmaps
  • 21. My Worst Nightmare •  Pens  and  paper   •  IdenOfy  an  exisOng  or  future  soluOon  or  parOcular   feature   •  Ask  people  to  draw  their  worst  nightmares.   •  People  present  their  drawings  to  the  group     •  Observe  and  discuss  any  posiOve  and  negaOve   a5ributes  from  a  worst  nightmare  event.   •  Discuss  what  sweet  dreams  look  like  a^erwards.   •  Lets  people  vent  some  of  their  frustraOon.     Goal: Identify what can go wrong
  • 22. Lets  Play  !  
  • 23. Speedboat:  What  is  holding  us  back  from  becoming  an  Agile   organisaOon  with  high  performance  that  delight  their  customers  ?       “Iden5fy  shallow  and  deep  anchors,  Iceberg  that  may  sink  the  ship   if  we  don’t  steer  around  them,  and  the  favorable  winds  that  we   need  to  push  us  forward”  
  • 24. •  Stakeholders  want  an  exact  outcome  for  fixed  cost   •  Distributed  Teams   •  The  importance  placed  on  old  culture   •  Entrenched  management  style   •  Lack  of  skills  and  experience   •  No  senior  leadership  buy-­‐in   •  No  commitment  to  agile  change   •  Management  micro  managing  delivery  teams   •  People  don’t  want  to  change   •  Mistaken  belief  that  we  are  already  an  Agile  organisa5on   •  Fear  of  failure  masked  by  too  much  up-­‐front  thinking  and  design   •  Closed  Minds   •  Unwilling  execu5ves  resistant  to  change   •  Tradi5onal  thinking  mindset   •  Teams  not  on  same  mindset   •  Lack  of  collabora5on   •  Conflict  with  other  teams  that  work  waterfall  non-­‐agile   •  Cannot  Influence  or  invoke  collabora5on  in  a  matrix  structure   •  Lead  tech  doesn’t  believe  in  it   •  Cosy  deal  with  big  consul5ng  organisa5on   •  We  have  always  done  it  this  way  
  • 25. •  Major  Agile  Team  or  Project  Failure   •  Arrogance  that  “of  course  we’re  doing  Agile  right”   •  Lack  of  Senior  Management  Involvement   •  Agile  Team  Building  Ac5vi5es   •  Collabora5on   •  Unclear  Scope   •  “One  Size  fits  All“  Approach   •  People  losing  their  power   •  Digression  to  Old  Behaviours   •  Lack  of  educa5on  of  Agile  prac5ces   •  Conflic5ng  priori5es  across  business  units   •  Distributed  Team  not  co-­‐located   •  Size  of  customer  engagement   •  Lack  of  customer  buy-­‐in  to  Agile   •  Too  busy  to  “re-­‐think”/improve  prac5ces   •  Management  processes  entrenched  and  resistant  to  change   •  Varied  levels  of  understanding  Agile  “managing  percep5ons”   •  Blame  culture   •  Scale  of  Projects  
  • 26. •  Empowering  development  teams   •  Whole  of  business  engagement   •  Higher  collabora5on  in  and  between  teams   •  Con5nuous  improvement  and  feedback   •  Enthusias5c  management   •  Include  everyone  needed  early  on  in  itera5on  
  • 27. anton.rossouw@tabar.com.au