Authenticity and trust    on the Internet    Chris Heathcote    @antimega    anti-mega.comI realised after submitting it t...
orso I’m renaming it
got to be real
if you think I’m going to be talking about things like OpenID, OAuth
well, sorry, I’m not                       x
not talking about   technical trustI’m not talking about technical ideas of trust
identity   trust   authenticitythese words have been co-opted to be technical specifications
trust is rarely binarythat don’t work the same way as their equivalents in the real world
trust grows over timeyou gain trust over time
generally, we are   trustingwe as humans trust others - this is a good thing
& we’re very good at   smelling ratsand we’re good at judging how much we should trust each other
here’s a restaurant review comment, probably by PR - slightly too much detail, people writein a different way when they ha...
on the Internet we   have so little to go onbut we have very little information with which to make a decision
looking for broken   windowsso we look for the things that seem wrong - any little thing
I’m never an Honoured Customer...
basic craftso, there’s trust that comes from the craft of graphic design, web design and copywriting
Dopplrwhen Dopplr launched...
TripIt vs dopplrTripIt also launched, but it just felt... American - so I used Dopplr
Google in 1999 - looks pretty much the same as now
this is how Google started in 1998, reminds me of what Altavista - then the #1 - looked like
ESTAdoes this inspire confidence? It looks like it was designed on paper rather than being of theweb
and this is one way of filing your tax return in the US - it smells wrong, like it’s a downloadedtemplate. Even the securit...
disclaimerA disclaimer: I am not talking on behalf of gov.uk - but I have just started working there
gov.ukIt’s a solid, modern design and at least you’ll get a consistent experience with any interactionwith the Government ...
anti-designthere are many anti-design patterns that reduce trust
Verified by Visa looks undesigned and is at odds with the site you’re using
lockerzI’m not sure, but I think Lockerz wants me to sign up with Facebook
Facebook appsFacebook apps just don’t give enough information to judge - who made it, what will it do,what does it let me do
Yes Menon the flip side, it’s attention to detail and craft that lets people like the Yes Men dupe others- there’s a facebo...
authenticityit’s about being authentic and genuine
authenticity increases   trustwhich creates trust
authenticity can come   from many things...   product   provenance   peopleand there are many ways of proving authenticity
productproducts have an easy authenticity - they exist - but also how they’re made and what they do
BromptonBrompton make bikes. They’re designers and makers.
And they’re all still built in West London. they did look at Chinese manufacture, but it endedup being about the same pric...
we love a good storypeople love stories, and love products and services with a story
Moleskine started production in 1994. It’s not an old brand. But they use a bit of slightlyweaselly copy to associate them...
heritageheritage is a great story to tell
you only have a   heritage if one day you   start making something   newbut I want to be clear: you can only have a herita...
the romance of historymany stories of authenticity are a romantic view - of a product’s history
physical products have   the romance of makingor the romance of making and craft: which many makers don’t realise - becaus...
provenancewhere things come from is a good, authentic story
HiutHiut Denim have a simple premise - their town is making jeans again
which is exactly what Cardigan used to do
Historytag - the provenance of your individual object - they take photos of your jeans asthey’re being made. They also emb...
Nokia always wanted to be American, or Japanese. It just couldn’t understand why it could orshould be proud of a long Finn...
and now, all physical products now have to be completely clear about their provenance, andtheir suppliers’ provenance
http://www.enoughproject.org/conflict-mineralsall the way back to raw materials - tin, tantalum, tungsten both cause war a...
Internet companies shy   away from being from   somewhereor actually, generally try to pretend to be American, or at least...
it doesn’t have to be complicated... an address you can look up in Google Maps
startups proud to be   from Berlin?but it could be so much more
people
personalityWhat many of the original popular web sites had in common was that it was small teams withbuckets of personality
Flickr, Delicious,   Upcoming ... people of   the web on the weband these people were on the web, using their product, usi...
proudthey were proud of what they had made
some of Brompton’s employees
even companies making machines of war
have a human side
facelessmany start-ups and small businesses are faceless
some systems give you little to work on - Ebay added seller ratings were introduced to addelements of trust - taken togeth...
Kickstarter gives you the same design and format for every project... It’s hard to discern whowill be good at making and p...
People have really lost their sense of smell as to whether the people behind a project will beable to keep their promise.
When I first saw pebble is sounded great but I knew how hard it would be to make.
...so to see they’d got a prototype, and that they’ve done it before, that’s when I pledged mymoney.
companies companyingI feel there’s no better advertisement than seeing that a company is doing its job
even at a base level, numbers.This says millions of people have not been fired for using Basecamp.
37signalsand personal stories of users
even companies like General Electric can show their long history of making and doing on atumblr
net-a-porterbut you can go further - this shows live shopping on net-a-porter.
bookdepositoryand the same for books on thebookdepository
Things showing liveness give you confidence that you’re doing the right thing
33 other people cannot be wrong.
Even constant Twitter updates on how things are going
countries countryingI love that this phenomenon has grown to promote countries, too.
IcelandIceland’s not had much luck recently. And therefore not much money to promote itself.
They’ve got a blog...
and are on Twitter...
and Facebook...
and tumblr....
and vimeo....
but they’re doing some even more interesting things. This flickr group encourages locals andtourists to upload pictures fro...
...that turns into a tumblr.
There’s every single word in Icelandic...
Icelandic bands that are not Sigur Ros...
a shop for good Icelandic music...
Single serving Internet jokes du jour...
The whole campaign is just a small group of people given the freedom to create and make apersonality that tells you more a...
SwedenSweden started doing something similar, but even cleverer.
They give the @sweden Twitter account to a different Swede every week.
They get to talk about whatever they want.
A mix of attitudes, politics, daily life...
Here’s Sweden talking to New Zealand on twitter.
And they’ve had all kinds of people - Internet entrepreneurs, lesbian truckdrivers... [sincethis, there’s been some contro...
Twitter can be adifferent way to talkwith customerspeople
FGW TwitterThis started as just one customer support representative. People started having conversationswith her.
People aren’t really expecting answers to rhetorical frustration.
first directFirst Direct have a great brand, but these responses are still slightly depersonalised.
AvivaHere’s an insurance company. Look, there’s Dave & Marv, they’re who you’re talking to.
It’s a lot harder to bean arsehole when youcan picture the personyou’re talking to
Don’t depersonalise as   it growsResponse times to large customer support twitter feeds is slowing to days - the same asem...
could this be takenfurther?
“Well, are you proud ofwhat’s going on insideyour company? Are youproud enough to pull upthe shades and letpeople see insi...
gov.uk github?Again a disclaimer that I’m not talking on behalf of gov.uk... but most of our code is availableon github fo...
But I want to talk about an even bigger project - Ford nearly got it right in 2000, maybe just abit too early. Ford wanted...
happy employeesAnd the only way you can open up like that is to have truly happy, engaged employees.
that won’t be sacked   for making mistakes- that won’t be told of for talking to customers
“Every company has a  social media strategy  whether they know it  or not.”   Douglas Rushkoff   http://cheath.co/rushkoff...
radical, personal   authenticityThis is a radical, personal authenticity: the same authenticity and openness that start-up...
Thank you.   @antimega   anti-mega.comThanks.
Authenticity & trust on the Internet
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Authenticity & trust on the Internet

  1. 1. Authenticity and trust on the Internet Chris Heathcote @antimega anti-mega.comI realised after submitting it that this sounds like the most boring talk ever from this title
  2. 2. orso I’m renaming it
  3. 3. got to be real
  4. 4. if you think I’m going to be talking about things like OpenID, OAuth
  5. 5. well, sorry, I’m not x
  6. 6. not talking about technical trustI’m not talking about technical ideas of trust
  7. 7. identity trust authenticitythese words have been co-opted to be technical specifications
  8. 8. trust is rarely binarythat don’t work the same way as their equivalents in the real world
  9. 9. trust grows over timeyou gain trust over time
  10. 10. generally, we are trustingwe as humans trust others - this is a good thing
  11. 11. & we’re very good at smelling ratsand we’re good at judging how much we should trust each other
  12. 12. here’s a restaurant review comment, probably by PR - slightly too much detail, people writein a different way when they have an agenda
  13. 13. on the Internet we have so little to go onbut we have very little information with which to make a decision
  14. 14. looking for broken windowsso we look for the things that seem wrong - any little thing
  15. 15. I’m never an Honoured Customer...
  16. 16. basic craftso, there’s trust that comes from the craft of graphic design, web design and copywriting
  17. 17. Dopplrwhen Dopplr launched...
  18. 18. TripIt vs dopplrTripIt also launched, but it just felt... American - so I used Dopplr
  19. 19. Google in 1999 - looks pretty much the same as now
  20. 20. this is how Google started in 1998, reminds me of what Altavista - then the #1 - looked like
  21. 21. ESTAdoes this inspire confidence? It looks like it was designed on paper rather than being of theweb
  22. 22. and this is one way of filing your tax return in the US - it smells wrong, like it’s a downloadedtemplate. Even the security certificate is attributed to the generic-sounding Free File Alliance.
  23. 23. disclaimerA disclaimer: I am not talking on behalf of gov.uk - but I have just started working there
  24. 24. gov.ukIt’s a solid, modern design and at least you’ll get a consistent experience with any interactionwith the Government online - trust gets built through re-use
  25. 25. anti-designthere are many anti-design patterns that reduce trust
  26. 26. Verified by Visa looks undesigned and is at odds with the site you’re using
  27. 27. lockerzI’m not sure, but I think Lockerz wants me to sign up with Facebook
  28. 28. Facebook appsFacebook apps just don’t give enough information to judge - who made it, what will it do,what does it let me do
  29. 29. Yes Menon the flip side, it’s attention to detail and craft that lets people like the Yes Men dupe others- there’s a facebook widget, Twitter, written in corporatese...
  30. 30. authenticityit’s about being authentic and genuine
  31. 31. authenticity increases trustwhich creates trust
  32. 32. authenticity can come from many things... product provenance peopleand there are many ways of proving authenticity
  33. 33. productproducts have an easy authenticity - they exist - but also how they’re made and what they do
  34. 34. BromptonBrompton make bikes. They’re designers and makers.
  35. 35. And they’re all still built in West London. they did look at Chinese manufacture, but it endedup being about the same price, and they’d lose all of their sales in China & Asia if they didn’thave this story and authenticity.
  36. 36. we love a good storypeople love stories, and love products and services with a story
  37. 37. Moleskine started production in 1994. It’s not an old brand. But they use a bit of slightlyweaselly copy to associate themselves with being 200 years old (fwiw, moleskine was thegeneric term used by artists to describe similar notebooks).
  38. 38. heritageheritage is a great story to tell
  39. 39. you only have a heritage if one day you start making something newbut I want to be clear: you can only have a heritage if one day you make something new
  40. 40. the romance of historymany stories of authenticity are a romantic view - of a product’s history
  41. 41. physical products have the romance of makingor the romance of making and craft: which many makers don’t realise - because it’s their dayjob and there’s little romance in the actual grind of making things day after day
  42. 42. provenancewhere things come from is a good, authentic story
  43. 43. HiutHiut Denim have a simple premise - their town is making jeans again
  44. 44. which is exactly what Cardigan used to do
  45. 45. Historytag - the provenance of your individual object - they take photos of your jeans asthey’re being made. They also embed the story directly in the product.
  46. 46. Nokia always wanted to be American, or Japanese. It just couldn’t understand why it could orshould be proud of a long Finnish history.
  47. 47. and now, all physical products now have to be completely clear about their provenance, andtheir suppliers’ provenance
  48. 48. http://www.enoughproject.org/conflict-mineralsall the way back to raw materials - tin, tantalum, tungsten both cause war and enslavechildren in the Congo - blood electronics. We don’t own conflict-free electronics.
  49. 49. Internet companies shy away from being from somewhereor actually, generally try to pretend to be American, or at least from somewhere in the mid-Atlantic
  50. 50. it doesn’t have to be complicated... an address you can look up in Google Maps
  51. 51. startups proud to be from Berlin?but it could be so much more
  52. 52. people
  53. 53. personalityWhat many of the original popular web sites had in common was that it was small teams withbuckets of personality
  54. 54. Flickr, Delicious, Upcoming ... people of the web on the weband these people were on the web, using their product, using other services
  55. 55. proudthey were proud of what they had made
  56. 56. some of Brompton’s employees
  57. 57. even companies making machines of war
  58. 58. have a human side
  59. 59. facelessmany start-ups and small businesses are faceless
  60. 60. some systems give you little to work on - Ebay added seller ratings were introduced to addelements of trust - taken together with the amount of feedback and what people have written
  61. 61. Kickstarter gives you the same design and format for every project... It’s hard to discern whowill be good at making and producing. It’s pretty easy to find someone to make you aconvincing video, harder to make products.
  62. 62. People have really lost their sense of smell as to whether the people behind a project will beable to keep their promise.
  63. 63. When I first saw pebble is sounded great but I knew how hard it would be to make.
  64. 64. ...so to see they’d got a prototype, and that they’ve done it before, that’s when I pledged mymoney.
  65. 65. companies companyingI feel there’s no better advertisement than seeing that a company is doing its job
  66. 66. even at a base level, numbers.This says millions of people have not been fired for using Basecamp.
  67. 67. 37signalsand personal stories of users
  68. 68. even companies like General Electric can show their long history of making and doing on atumblr
  69. 69. net-a-porterbut you can go further - this shows live shopping on net-a-porter.
  70. 70. bookdepositoryand the same for books on thebookdepository
  71. 71. Things showing liveness give you confidence that you’re doing the right thing
  72. 72. 33 other people cannot be wrong.
  73. 73. Even constant Twitter updates on how things are going
  74. 74. countries countryingI love that this phenomenon has grown to promote countries, too.
  75. 75. IcelandIceland’s not had much luck recently. And therefore not much money to promote itself.
  76. 76. They’ve got a blog...
  77. 77. and are on Twitter...
  78. 78. and Facebook...
  79. 79. and tumblr....
  80. 80. and vimeo....
  81. 81. but they’re doing some even more interesting things. This flickr group encourages locals andtourists to upload pictures from all around Iceland...
  82. 82. ...that turns into a tumblr.
  83. 83. There’s every single word in Icelandic...
  84. 84. Icelandic bands that are not Sigur Ros...
  85. 85. a shop for good Icelandic music...
  86. 86. Single serving Internet jokes du jour...
  87. 87. The whole campaign is just a small group of people given the freedom to create and make apersonality that tells you more about the country than glossy brochureware.
  88. 88. SwedenSweden started doing something similar, but even cleverer.
  89. 89. They give the @sweden Twitter account to a different Swede every week.
  90. 90. They get to talk about whatever they want.
  91. 91. A mix of attitudes, politics, daily life...
  92. 92. Here’s Sweden talking to New Zealand on twitter.
  93. 93. And they’ve had all kinds of people - Internet entrepreneurs, lesbian truckdrivers... [sincethis, there’s been some controversy as the chosen curators has spoken their opinions - butinstead of shutting them down, it’s been a case of the Internet engaging in conversation (andcriticism)]
  94. 94. Twitter can be adifferent way to talkwith customerspeople
  95. 95. FGW TwitterThis started as just one customer support representative. People started having conversationswith her.
  96. 96. People aren’t really expecting answers to rhetorical frustration.
  97. 97. first directFirst Direct have a great brand, but these responses are still slightly depersonalised.
  98. 98. AvivaHere’s an insurance company. Look, there’s Dave & Marv, they’re who you’re talking to.
  99. 99. It’s a lot harder to bean arsehole when youcan picture the personyou’re talking to
  100. 100. Don’t depersonalise as it growsResponse times to large customer support twitter feeds is slowing to days - the same asemail or web support. People like that Twitter support feels different to standard supportchannels.
  101. 101. could this be takenfurther?
  102. 102. “Well, are you proud ofwhat’s going on insideyour company? Are youproud enough to pull upthe shades and letpeople see inside?”Douglas Rushkoffhttp://cheath.co/rushkoffquote
  103. 103. gov.uk github?Again a disclaimer that I’m not talking on behalf of gov.uk... but most of our code is availableon github for people to see and even help develop.
  104. 104. But I want to talk about an even bigger project - Ford nearly got it right in 2000, maybe just abit too early. Ford wanted to give all employees a computer & internet connection - so theycould listen to real customers and even support them. If you have a brake problem, you wantto talk to the person who design the brakes, not a CS agent.
  105. 105. happy employeesAnd the only way you can open up like that is to have truly happy, engaged employees.
  106. 106. that won’t be sacked for making mistakes- that won’t be told of for talking to customers
  107. 107. “Every company has a social media strategy whether they know it or not.” Douglas Rushkoff http://cheath.co/rushkoffquote“You can have your dedicated social media person chasing down consumer complaints, butyour real social media strategy is how are the people who work at your company and thepeople who buy from your company and people who supply to your company, how are theytalking about you?”
  108. 108. radical, personal authenticityThis is a radical, personal authenticity: the same authenticity and openness that start-ups canhave, scaled massively to the largest of companies. Hard to do but offers a genuineadvantage over your competition.
  109. 109. Thank you. @antimega anti-mega.comThanks.
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