Stéphane Rosière (Université de Reims, France) : "Which (de)materialization for international borders?"

1,670 views

Published on

Les frontières internationales contemporaines sont caractérisées par un processus, en apparence contradictoire, de virtualisation ou d’effacement et de matérialisation. La virtualisation résulte de la porosité grandissante des frontières traversées par des flux de plus en plus importants. Les frontières s’effaceraient donc, ou se feraient «discrètes», elles seraient aussi marquées par une logique de délinéarisation et déterritorialisation (développement de frontières “punctiformes”, comme dans les aéroports). Cependant, dans le même temps, les frontières sont marquées par un processus de sur-matérialisation avec la construction de nombreuses “barrières” (Israël, États-Unis, Arabie saoudite, Ceuta et Melilla, etc.) souvent appelées “murs”. Cette présentation tentera de montrer comme ces dynamiques, loin d’être contradictoires, sont plutôt liées dans une logique de hiérarchisation des flux dans laquelle l’homme apparaît plus problématique que les marchandises.

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,670
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1,087
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
3
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Stéphane Rosière (Université de Reims, France) : "Which (de)materialization for international borders?"

  1. 1. ANTIATLAS  DES  FRONTIERES   COLLOQUE  INTERNATIONAL     Aix-­‐en-­‐Provence,  2  October    2013           Which  (de)materializa>on  for   interna>onal  borders?           Pr.  Stéphane  Rosière             Université  de  Reims  Champagne-­‐Ardenne  (France)     Université  Matej  Bel  (Banska  Bystrica,  Slovakia)  ;       Directeur  de  la  revue  en  ligne  L’Espace  poli-que    
  2. 2. IntroducNon   •  Contemporary  internaNonal  borders  undergo  a   paradoxical  process  of  materializaNon/dematerializaNon.   •  -­‐  DematerializaNon    (deleNon,  virtualizaNon)  has  various   spaNal  significances  :  delinearizaNon  and  disseminaNon.   •  -­‐Paradoxically,  a  materialisaNon  process  (symbolized  by   ‘border  barriers’  i.e.  walls  or  fences)  is  also  going  on.   •  Connected  quesNons  :  Are  these  processes   contradictory?  What  is  the  efficient  border  in  terms  of   control?   2  
  3. 3. Common  (western)  representaNons  of   (de)materializaNon   The  immaterial  border  :  the  good  border,   Here  as  imagined  by  Uderzo…   The  material  border  :  the  bad  one     Symbolic  dimension  is  important,  the  word  ‘wall’  is  not  considered  cool…   3  
  4. 4. Content   •  1.  A  materializaNon  disconnected  from  armed   conflicts   •  2.  TechnologizaNon  of  control  and  its  consequences   •  3.  From  «  securitary  conNnuum  »  to  border   disseminaNon   4/23  
  5. 5. 1.  Materializa>on  disconnected  with  armed   conflictuality       •  Most  of  the  up-­‐to-­‐date  ‘materializaNon’  of  internaNonal   borders  is  disconnected  from  armed  conflicts  but  linked   with  flows  (migraNons).  Human  beings  are  the  problem…     •  About  75%  of  contemporary  border  barriers  are  erected   between  countries  having  good  mutual  relaNons  (USA/ Mexico,  EU  and  NEP  countries,  etc.);   •  About  25%  of  border  barriers  are  directly  connected  with   armed  conflicts  (Marocco,  Kashmir,  Israel/PalesNne).   5  
  6. 6. Contemporary  Border  barriers   The  growing  success  of  mulNscalar  ‘teichopoliNcs’,  poliNcs  of  territory   enclosure  (Ballif  &  Rosiere,  2009)  within  ciNes  or  around  states   22  620  km  of  border  barriers   6  
  7. 7. Context  :  a  reducNon  of  ‘classical’  territorial  conflicts   in  spite  of  the  growing  number  of    states   (Rosière,  2011)     A  global  trend  :  the  ‘semlement  of  border’  /  «  règlement  frontalier  »  (Foucher,  2007).   InternaNonal  borders  are  less     7  
  8. 8.   2.  TechnologizaNon  of  borders  and  its   consequences  on  (de)materilizaNon       •  Increase  of  flux  is  one  of  the  most  prominent   characterisNc  of  globalizaNon  and  implies  a  growing   pressure  on  borders  (more  controls).   •  This  situaNon  underlines  the  old  contradicNon  between   circulaNon  and  security  (Gommann  1973).   •  ‘TechnologizaNon'  of  borders  surveillance  appeared  to  be   the  best  soluNon  to  solve  this  contradicNon.   •  The  'technologizaNon'  of  borders  can  be  connected  with   a  more  general  ‘technologizaNon’  of  security    (Ayse   Ceyhan,  2008).   8  
  9. 9. 2.1.  TechnologizaNon  of  borders  and   technologizaNon  of  security   •  TechnologizaNon  of  security,  «  i.e.  the  making  of   technology  the  centerpiece  of  security  systems  and  its   percepNon  as  an  absolute  security  provider,  started  in  the   US  in  the  80’s  and  has  since  been  expanded  to  the  EU  and   to  almost  all  developed  countries.  »  (Ceyhan,  2008)   •  This  dynamic  bounds  together  civilian  and  military  logics:   •  -­‐  ‘militarizaNon’  of  civil  borders  and  ‘civilianizaNon’  of   military  lines  (see  Shira  Havkin,  2011)     •  -­‐  MilitarizaNon  mostly  means  growing  use  of  military   technologies.   9  
  10. 10.   2.2.  ‘DemateralizaNon’  technologies  :   smart  borders  and  virtual  borders      ‘Smart  borders  ’  :  Automated  Border  Crossing  (ABC)  –  here  in  Sciphol  —  a   way  of  making  border  crossing  process  faster  and  smoother…  for  the  EU’s   ciNzens.    The  use  of  these  technologies  must  be  connected  with  liberal  ideology  (to   employ  less  state  agents  and  offer  big  firms  new  markets).   The  symbolic  dimension  must  not  be  neglect  :  the  machines  are  not  invisible   10   (the  fear  is  a  component  of  the  process).  
  11. 11. ‘Integrated’  border  systems     Every  ‘Integrated’  border  system  includes  various   technologies  interconnected  at  three  different  scales:   •  -­‐Command  control  &  intelligence  at  naNonal  level,   •  -­‐Regional  command  level,     •  -­‐Local  level  (terrain).   Border  Integrated    Management  (BIM)  implies  :     -­‐  coordinated  surveillance     -­‐  connecNon  with  huge  (biometric,  administraNve)   databases  and  direct  access  to  visa-­‐issuing  authoriNes   (disseminaNon,  or  ubiquitous  process)   11  
  12. 12. Integrated  border  systems  :  invisible  networks   Integrated  Security  System  on  Romanian  Serbian  Border.  A  MulNlevel  /  mulNscalar  management     URL  :  hmp://www.miratelecom.ro/en/security/reference-­‐projects/integrated-­‐security-­‐system-­‐on-­‐the-­‐danube-­‐romanian-­‐serbian-­‐border.html   12  
  13. 13. Virtual  fence   •  A  theoreNcally  invisible   border  based  on  video   surveillance,  sensors,   radars,  drones,  etc.   •  Here  a  physical  barrier   assists  telesurveillance   •  Expensive  systems   (More  developped   countries)   •  The  physical  barrier  is   one  element  of  the   ‘virtual’  fence   13  
  14. 14. DematerializaNon  implies   thet  contemporary  border   guards  spend  long  periods  in   front  of  screens.     In  such  contexte,   human  beings     are  dematerialized.   14  
  15. 15. 3.  From  ‘security  con>nuum’     to  border  dissemina>on   •  Didier  Bigo  labelled  the  concept  a  ‘security  conNnuum’  (1996)   linking  together  very  different  acNviNes:  terrorism,  trafficking,  and   illegal  migraNons.   •  Since  the  80’s,  undocumented  immigrants  and  asylum  seekers  are   considered  as  a  threat  in  terms  of  security.   •  The  ‘security  conNnuum’  focuses  on  all  Clandes-ne  Transna-onal   Actors:  «  nonstate  actors  who  operate  across  na-onal  borders  in   viola-on  of  state  laws  and  who  aBempt  to  evade  law  enforcement   efforts.  »  (Andreas  2003)       •  Into  this  frame  border  (line  or  checkpoints)  is  only  an  element  of   control  among  others.   15  
  16. 16. 3.1.Which  gradient  of  (de)materiality?   •  It  is  rather  difficult  to  conceptualized  border   according  to  some  linear  gradient  of   (de)materiality  (+  or  -­‐  ,  or  binary  0/1)   •  At  the  contrary,  materializaNon  and   dematerializaNon  are  owen  complementary  (slide   13  of  the  virtual  fence).   •  The  dematerializaNon  does  not  mean  less   «  barriers  »  on  the  terrain.     •  Various  forms  of  virtual  control  assist  various   forms  of  physical  control  and  materializa>on.   16   16  
  17. 17. For  long,  boundary  stones  materialized  an  approved,   and  pacified  demarcaNon  line.     Polish  /  Belarus  border,  photo  S.  Rosière,  2010.   17  
  18. 18. 3.2.  Asymetrical  borders     and  asymetrical  materiality   Asymetry  is  a  usefull  tool  to     conceptualize  borders     (Foucher  2007,  Ritaine  2009)  
  19. 19. Asymetrical  (de)materializaNon:   the  case  of  Nexus  program   19  
  20. 20. Nexus  on  the  US/Quebec  boundary   Portable  RFID     readers   By  waving  a  photo  ID  that  includes  an  Radio  Frequency  IdenNficaNon  tag  at  border   inspecNon,  the  informaNon  stored  on  the  card  is  analyzed  by  CBPinspectors  who  verify   that  the  card  holder  is  an  approved  frequent  traveler.       20  
  21. 21. Conclusions   •  We  are  not  living  a  dematerilizaNon  process  of   borders  but  a  simultaneous  process  of   materializa>on  and  dematerializa>on.   •  The  efficiency  of  border  systems  must  be   discussed  (in  a  Nme  of  funds  shorNng).  What  is   the  real  aim  of  virtual  border  or  walls?  To   produce  a  new  ‘Lumpenproletariat’?  (Nicola  Mai)   •  Beyond  the  objecNves,  the  symbolic  dimension  of   borders  remains  essenNal.  A  wall  is  first  of  all  a   symbol.  We  can  stress  that  a  exagerated   dematerializaNon  could  be  counter-­‐producNve.   21  
  22. 22. What  is  visible  can  produce  fear   22  
  23. 23. •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  AMILHAT-­‐SZARY,  A.-­‐L.,  GIRAULT,  F.,  (2011),  "FronNères  mobiles  :  présentaNon  du  colloque  BRIT  XI",  [En  ligne]   hmp://www.unige.ch/ses/geo/britXI/index/BRIT_ProgramFinal__.pdf   ANDREAS,  P.,  (2003),  “Redrawing  the  line.  Borders  and  Security  in  the  Twenty-­‐first  Century”.  Interna-onal  Security   (28)  2,  78-­‐111.   ANDREAS,  P.,  (2001),  Border  games.  Policing  the  US-­‐Mexico  Divide.  Ithaca,  London:  Cornell  UniversiNes  Press   BIGO,  D.,  (1996),  Polices  en  réseaux,  l’expérience  européenne.  Paris:  Presses  de  Sciences  Po.   CEYHAN,  A.,  (2008),  TechnologizaNon  of  Security:  Management  of  Uncertainty  and  Risk  in  the  Age  of  Biometrics.   Surveillance  and  Society  (5)  2,  102-­‐123   DAVID,  Ch.-­‐P.,  VALLET,  E.,  2012,  «  Du  retour  des  murs  frontaliers  en  relaNons  internaNonales  »,  Etudes   interna-onales,  «  Le  retour  des  murs  en  relaNons  internaNonales  »,  vol.  XLIII,  n°1,  5-­‐27.   DOLLFUS,  O.,  (2007),  La  mondialisa-on.  Paris,  Presses  de  Sciences-­‐Po.   FOUCHER,  M.,  (2007),  L’obsession  des  fron-ères.  Paris:  Perrin.   GOTTMANN,  J.,  (1973),  The  Significance  of  Territory.  Charlomesville:  University  Press  of  Virginia.   HAVKIN,  Sh.,  (2011),  La  privaNsaNon  des  checkpoints:  quand  l'occupaNon  militaire  rencontre  le  néolibéralisme.  In   S.  Lame-­‐Abdallah  &  C.  Parizot,  Arles,  Actes  Sud,  51-­‐72   MUELLER,  J.,  (1989),  Retreat  from  Doomsday:  the  Obsolescence  of  Major  War.  New  York:  Basic  Books.   POPESCU  G.,  (2011),  Bordering  and  Ordering  the  Twenty-­‐first  Century:  Understanding  Borders,  Rowman  &   Limlefield.   RAZAC,  O.,  (2000),  Histoire  poli-que  du  barbelé.  Paris:  La  Fabrique.   RITAINE,  É.  (2009),  «  La  barrière  et  le  checkpoint  :  mise  en  poliNque  de  l’asymétrie  ».  Cultures  &  Conflits,  n°  73,   15-­‐33  [En  ligne]  hmp://conflits.revues.org/index17500.html   ROSIERE  S.,  (2012),  «  Vers  des  guerres  migratoires  structurelles  ?  »  Bulle-n  de  l’Associa-on  de  géographes   Français,  Dossier  :  Risques  et  conflits,  vol.  89,  n°1,  54-­‐73.   ROSIÈRE,  S.,  (2010),  «  La  fragmentaNon  de  l’espace  étaNque  mondial.  »  L'Espace  Poli-que  [En  ligne],  11  |  2010-­‐2,   mis  en  ligne  le  16  novembre  2010,  Consulté  le  28  novembre  2012.  URL  :  hmp://espacepoliNque.revues.org/ index1608.html   SAADA  Julien,  (2010),  "L’économie  du  Mur  :  un  marché  en  pleine  expansion".  Le  Banquet.  Centre  d’étude  et  de   réflexion  pour  l’acNon  poliNque  (CERAP),  n°  27,  59-­‐86   SPARKE,  M.  B.  (2006).  "A  neoliberal  nexus:  Economy,  security  and  the  biopoliNcs  of  ciNzenship  on  the  border".   Poli-cal  Geography  (25)  2,  151-­‐180.     23  

×