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Types of indexes

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  • 1. Prepared and discussed by: Agulto, Ernani A. IV-15 BLIS
  • 2. INDEXESCan be categorized many ways;By arrangement or by searching structure or by specific subject fields or by purpose.Can be a mix of different types of indexes. e.g. alphabetical and author.
  • 3. FORMS of INDEXBy arrangement, (E.g. alphabetical, classified…)By the types of materials index, (E.g. book, periodical, newspaper index…)By physical form. (E.g. card, microform, computerized index)
  • 4. ALPHABETICAL INDEXESIs the most common method.More convenient and follows familiar order.Based on orderly principle of letters of the alphabet.All entries are in one alphabetical order, including subject terms, author names and place names.
  • 5. ALPHABETICAL INDEXESMAJOR DRAWBACKS: problems of synonym and scattering of entries. Scattering- Subjects are not drawn together under generic term E.g. When looking for the information on janitor fish, do we look for janitor fish or fish?
  • 6. AUTHOR INDEXESNot the most common type of indexes, but not a rarity.Are those whose entry points are people, organizations, corporate authors, etc…Users are guided to titles of documents by the way of authors.Authors can also be used as an indirect subject approach.
  • 7. AUTHOR INDEXESAuthors are strong indicators of subject content (Cleveland, 1976) e.g. Freud, Sigmund- Psychology or psychoanalysis.
  • 8. BOOK INDEXESMost people (reading public) think of.Are lists of words, generally alphabetical, at the back of the book, giving the page location of the subject or name associated with each word.Pinpoints the information to the user.ISSUE: not every book (e.g reference book) has a quality index, if not, none at all.
  • 9. CITATION INDEXESConsists of a list of articles, with a sublist under each article of subsequently published papers that cite the articles.Shows who cited the paper.This kind of index implies that a cited paper has an internal subject relationship with the papers that cited it, and use this relationship to cluster related documents– citations reflect document content.
  • 10. CITATION INDEXESPRIMARY ADVANTAGE: leads the user to the latest articles.
  • 11. CLASSIFIED INDEXEShas its contents arranged systematically by classes or subject headings.Have an important role to play (especially in scientific indexing, e.g. biology).But general indexes that are classified mystify the general users, they do not understand how they are constructed.Indexes SHOULD BE user-oriented.
  • 12. COORDINATE INDEXESallow terms to be combined or coordinated.The idea of punching or notching a card and then using a mechanical device, such as long needles, to drop out cards containing the combination of index terms of interest.The basis of modern retrieval systems, world wide web search tools.
  • 13. COORDINATE INDEXESIs really a process; coordinating produces an index. e.g. individual index terms Pecan and Trees are combined, we have a new class of things: Pecan trees.
  • 14. CUMULATIVE INDEXES is a combination or merging of a set of indexes over time.Indexes for established works can often cover many decades.Generally, apply to journals and to large, important works and are published as separate volumes.Are complex and usually done by teams of indexers.
  • 15. FACETED INDEXESFacet, by definition, means one side of something that has many sides.In a faceted indexing system, any subject is not a single unit but has many aspects;A facet index attempts to discover all the individual aspects of a subject and then synthesis them in a way that best describes the subject under discussion.
  • 16. FACETED INDEXESA faceted scheme is a type of synthetic classification,Often called an analytic-synthetic system.PHILOSOPHICAL BASIS: an author looks at a subject in a different way or brings out new ideas or a new discovery.
  • 17. FACETED INDEXESWith a faceted system, we put together the class most closely representing the informational concepts in the new document.