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Build a Private Practice 2013

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Presented at the American Counseling Association Conference by Thriveworks. Over 100 slides on building a private practice.

Presented at the American Counseling Association Conference by Thriveworks. Over 100 slides on building a private practice.

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  • Prelude to Private Practice Pointers from Anthony Centore As counselors, when we venture into private practice for the first time, we make the difficult transition from technician, to entrepreneur. The immensity of this transition cannot be overstated. As technicians, we are responsible for our craft—professional counseling. As entrepreneurs, we oversee a much broader spectrum of responsibilities. The change is the equivalent to a pizza dough thrower deciding to open a restaurant. During this transition, many counselors make a fatal error: they assume that running a practice is mostly about doing counseling. It’s not. To many in our industry, that statement is blasphemy. Our care-focused culture tells us that to turn our attention to “business” is to undermine client care. In that vein, many of us are taught that if we provide really good clinical care, the business will grow around us as our just reward. It won’t. I have seen good clinicians fail because of poor practice management. Scheduling errors, billing errors, cash-flow problems, unreturned voicemails, unkempt offices, unfulfilled records requests, poor customer service, unsuccessful advertising spends—all of these contribute to a practice’s demise. While good counseling alone won’t make a practice successful, a well-run practice is best positioned to offer great clinical care, customer service and support, and a consistent quality experience that exceeds client expectations. This is easier said than done. As practice owner, you may be a “one man” clinical staff, as well as CEO, CFO, CMO, CTO, COO, and receptionist! How do you manage all these roles with excellence? This is what my columns will be about. In this presentation, we will address a variety of roles one must fill to start or grow a practice.
  • One great thing about being a counselor is there are so many places to perform the trade. One can work for schools, insurance companies, employee assistance programs, group practices/agencies, nonprofits, residential care, government-funded programs and clinics, and many others. Although the employment landscape is diverse, many counselors begin their careers with the dream of someday having their very own private practice. To be their own boss! To steer their own ship! This article is for those counselors.
  • One great thing about being a counselor is there are so many places to perform the trade. One can work for schools, insurance companies, employee assistance programs, group practices/agencies, nonprofits, residential care, government-funded programs and clinics, and many others. Although the employment landscape is diverse, many counselors begin their careers with the dream of someday having their very own private practice. To be their own boss! To steer their own ship! This article is for those counselors.
  • One great thing about being a counselor is there are so many places to perform the trade. One can work for schools, insurance companies, employee assistance programs, group practices/agencies, nonprofits, residential care, government-funded programs and clinics, and many others. Although the employment landscape is diverse, many counselors begin their careers with the dream of someday having their very own private practice. To be their own boss! To steer their own ship! This article is for those counselors.
  • Dispelling Rumors about Insurance, Not Advocating for It.
  • Dispelling Rumors about Insurance, Not Advocating for It.
  • Wall tattoos. Original art.
  • No dark corners!
  • Sound proof the walls. better sound machines. spa music. NPR
  • magazines, community book, IPAD!
  • Something notable. community book. ipad. over-signage. toys. puzzles.
  • Transcript

    • 1. Thriving in Private Practice 2013 Starting and Growing a Counseling Business
    • 2. IntroductionTransition: Technician to EntrepreneurRunning a Practice is Not MostlyAbout Doing Counseling
    • 3. Is it wise for the average counselor tostart a private practice?
    • 4. Should I Start/Build a Private Practice?
    • 5. Reasons NOT to Start a Practice I need/want money now! I want to keep work separate from my life I hate business I want to focus on being a counselor I don’t want to start from scratch
    • 6. High Paid Agency Employee Spread the word Speak publicly Make the news Publish online and off Build a reputation Offer specialized services Help out Independently Credentialed
    • 7. The Bootstrapper’s Guide Make a Commitment Pay the Price Focus Constant Forward Motion
    • 8. The Bootstrapper’s Guide Reject Excuses Build Risk Tolerance Avoid Non-essential Partners Track your Progress
    • 9. Activity One
    • 10. Risk and Counseling Business Being an Employee is Risky Too Failure: Necessary but not Sufficient Betting the Ranch / Taking a Flyer Risk Versus Reward
    • 11. Activity Two
    • 12. Show me the Money! QuickTime™ and a H.264 decompressor are needed to see this picture.
    • 13. Show me the Money!
    • 14. According to salary.com, an LPC inCambridge, MA makes on average $39,778 ayear.
    • 15. Show me the Money! Insurance: $70 per 45 min. (90801, 90806, 90847) 35 x 48 x 70 = $117,600 That’s 26.25 hours a week of therapy
    • 16. Show me the Money!- $490 a month (5%) for marketing = $5880yearly$117,600 - $5880 = $111,720.00
    • 17. Show me the Money!BIlling is 6% (is $7,056.00)$111,720.00 - 7,056.00 = $104,664
    • 18. Show me the Money! Office: $500 a mo = $6000 yr Office Supplies = $3000 yr Professional Dues, insurance, education = $500 yr Other Misc. = $500 yr Total = $10,000 yr
    • 19. Show me the Money!Final With Medical Billing = $94,664.00Final without Medical Billing = $101,720.00Both are a FAR CRY from $39,778!
    • 20. Show me the Money! Let’s discuss some variables!
    • 21. Rumors about AcceptingHealth Insurance “I’ve heard I should stay away from health insurance” “I’ve heard that insurance companies don’t pay well” “I’ve heard insurance companies are impossible to deal with”
    • 22. Rumors about AcceptingHealth Insurance “I don’t want to be a slave to/employee of the insurance companies” “I don’t want to do all the additional documentation” “I don’t want to be told what clients I have to see”
    • 23. Insurance Panels Gives you Leverage HMOs More Popular Universality of HealthCare Mental Health Parity Panels Will Close
    • 24. As my 8-year-olddaughter Scoutie says:“You Have GOT to beKidding Me!?!”
    • 25. Medical Billing:The Dark Side of CounselingPracticeThe Dark Side of CounselingPractice
    • 26. 17 Reasons Your InsuranceClaims are Being Denied
    • 27. 1) You waited toolong to file the claim.
    • 28. 2) The insurance company lost theclaim, and then the claim expired.
    • 29. 3) You lackedauthorization.
    • 30. 4) The client didn’tacquire a physician referral.
    • 31. 5) You provided 2services in 1 day.
    • 32. 6) You ran out ofauthorized sessions.
    • 33. 7) The authorization timed out.
    • 34. 8) The client changed his/her insurance plan.
    • 35. 9) The client losthis/her insurance coverage.
    • 36. 10) The client waslate to pay his/her Cobra.
    • 37. 11) You sent the claim to the wrongmanaging company.
    • 38. 12) The provider isn’t paneled with theinsurance company!
    • 39. 13) Services wererendered at the wrong location.
    • 40. 14) The client’s OON benefits differ from their in-network benefits.
    • 41. 15) The service was already rendered.
    • 42. 16) The client has anout-of-state insurance plan.
    • 43. 17) The client has an unmet deductible!
    • 44. Medical Billing Takes Effort
    • 45. Activity Three
    • 46. Should I Specialize?
    • 47. OR...
    • 48. Finding The RightIdentity for YourPractice
    • 49. Should I Specialize? Populations Served Problems Treated Treatment Methods Used Business Identity
    • 50. Should I Specialize? - TIPS Don’t Specialize in Group Therapy Avoid Creating a Whole Health Program Consider Demand Stay Consistent Be the Best in the World Can work in a Small Town, Too.
    • 51. Your Therapy Office The Bar is Both QuickTime™ and a H.264 decompressor High and Low!are needed to see this picture.
    • 52. QuickTime™ and a H.264 decompressorare needed to see this picture.
    • 53. QuickTime™ and a H.264 decompressorare needed to see this picture.
    • 54. Your Therapy Office Paint the Pig
    • 55. Your Therapy Office Wall Art
    • 56. Your Therapy Office Good Lighting
    • 57. Your Therapy Office Music / Better Sound Barriers
    • 58. Your Therapy Office A Nice Place to Sit
    • 59. Your Therapy Office Something to Read
    • 60. Your Therapy Office Cell Phone Charger WIFI
    • 61. Your Therapy Office Refreshments
    • 62. Your Therapy Office Surprise and Delight
    • 63. First Impression...(it’s actually NOT your office)
    • 64. First Impressions... For many companies, its the person at the counter. For Counselors, it’s their voicemail :(
    • 65. Making a Good Impression ByVoicemail Trim the Fat(yes, voicemail) Smile Provide Value Hang up Um, Write it out Update Daily Emergency Instructions?
    • 66. First Impressions... Return Calls Veto Voicemail
    • 67. Building a Full Caseload: 40 Quick Tips
    • 68. Ethically Improving ClientRetention
    • 69. Ethically Improving ClientRetention Familiarize clients for a suitable course of treatment
    • 70. “I let new clients decide how often they come in,and I try not to influence their decision.”
    • 71. “I think clients know how often they need to seeme.”
    • 72. “It’s unethical to tell clients how often I think theyshould see me for therapy.”
    • 73. Ethically Improving ClientRetention Familiarize clients for a suitable course of treatment-- Again!
    • 74. “During the first appointment, I try to convincethe clients not to come back.”
    • 75. “The problem is that clients are ambivalentabout whether or not they want to be incounseling.”
    • 76. “If clients don’t continue treatment, they mustnot be ready to change.”
    • 77. Ethically Improving ClientRetention Familiarize clients for a suitable course of treatment--Again! And Again!
    • 78. “Many clients can be finished with counseling a5 or 6 sessions.”
    • 79. “The clients I saw today only needed 1 session.”
    • 80. Ethically Improving ClientRetention Don’t adopt a strict “disorder-model” approach to care.
    • 81. “We had little to talk about in therapy this week,which tells me that we must be finished withcounseling.”
    • 82. “When it seems we’re not making progress after asession or two, I suggest clients take a breakfrom counseling.”
    • 83. Ethically Improving ClientRetention Break the “See You Next Week” Mold
    • 84. “None of my clients want to see me more thanonce a week.”
    • 85. “I’m not a psychoanalyst. I can’t see clients morethan once a week.”
    • 86. Ethically Improving ClientRetention Don’t terminate too early.
    • 87. “Really?” I said. “Did he buy a ring?”
    • 88. “Um. No.”
    • 89. “He proposed?”
    • 90. “Haha, no. I didn’t think of that. Maybe we’re notdone after all.”
    • 91. Ethically Improving ClientRetention Follow up with Clients who have lost touch.
    • 92. “I’m worried that a phone call would be anuisance to my clients.”
    • 93. “My clients will be ‘creeped out’ if I call them.”
    • 94. “My client is an adult and should call me ifhe/she wants to continue seeing me.”
    • 95. Wrap Up
    • 96. Thriveworks.com/Private-Practice 1-855-4-THRIVE