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Introduction to the American experience of Placemaking” by Angelica Fortuzzi, PhD
 

Introduction to the American experience of Placemaking” by Angelica Fortuzzi, PhD

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“’Placemaking’ is both an overarching idea and a hands-on tool for improving a neighbourhood, city or region. It has the potential to be one of the most transformative ideas of this century”

“’Placemaking’ is both an overarching idea and a hands-on tool for improving a neighbourhood, city or region. It has the potential to be one of the most transformative ideas of this century”

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    Introduction to the American experience of Placemaking” by Angelica Fortuzzi, PhD Introduction to the American experience of Placemaking” by Angelica Fortuzzi, PhD Presentation Transcript

    • S S h l 2013 A t 21/28 J l 2013Summer School 2013 Artena, 21/28 July 2013 introduction to placemaking Angelica Fortuzzi, PhD / Summer School 2013 placemaking by Angelica Fortuzzi
    • What is placemaking? is an approach • multi-faceted • community driven• community-driven • bottom-up to the planning, design and management f bliof public spaces. Angelica Fortuzzi, PhD / Summer School 2013
    • What is placemaking? liti hi h d fi th hqualities which defines the approach what it is: ll b ti it d i i blcollaborative, community-driven, sociable culturally aware context-sensitive multi disciplinary YES!!! :-) multi-disciplinary visionary, inspiring function before form, focused on creating destinations adaptable inclusive ever changing transformativeadaptable, inclusive, ever changing, transformative, flexible what it is not:what it is not: imposed from above reactive, exclusionary, static, privatized, a quick fix project-focused, design-driven, discipline-driven, one- ( p j , g , p , size-fits-all, one-dimensional monolithic development, dependent on regulatory controls, overly accommodating of the car NOT!!! :-( Angelica Fortuzzi, PhD / Summer School 2013 y g A blanket solution benefit analysis, a cost
    • 3 different steps3 different steps discover create a common vision implementation Angelica Fortuzzi, PhD / Summer School 2013
    • 3 steps: discover a) the people/community b) the place c) the life and the living way a) people and the community: > looking at> looking at > listening to > asking questions to the people who work and play Questions: so what’s special in this community? Placemaking takes root when a community expresses needs and desires about places in their lives, even if there is not yet a clearly defined plan of action. Angelica Fortuzzi, PhD / Summer School 2013
    • 3 steps: discover b) discover the place: view a place in its entirety, pay attention to issues on the small scales. Tuning with place with a fresh eye Framing with questions: How many quality places are located nearby? and how are they connected? Are there places that should be more meaningful but aren’t? - look at connection with surroundings / and the community; - look at the degree of public/private spaces, at their boundaries, if any; - look at the dimension of the space and how it affects the relations between people Angelica Fortuzzi, PhD / Summer School 2013 between people.
    • 3 t3 steps: create a common visioncreate a common vision the information gathered is then used to create a common vision for that place. implementation the vision can evolve quickly into an implementation strategy Angelica Fortuzzi, PhD / Summer School 2013
    • Create a network: the power of 10 One great place is not enough, needg p g a number of them to create a truly lively city Power of 10 is a framework forPower of 10 is a framework for communities and stakeholders principle is: starts from smallest scale to accomplish big things The need of a network of good places at different scale:different scale: Place > neighbourhood > city > region is a collection of interesting communities on a regional scale by linking towns and cities, with major public spaces and mixed- use neighborhoods serving as the connections Angelica Fortuzzi, PhD / Summer School 2013 connections.
    • The power of 10!p The core idea is that any great place itself needs to offer at least 10 things to do or 10 reasons to be there… a place to sit, playgrounds to enjoy, art to touch, music to hear, food to eat, history to experience, and, y p , people to meet. A park is good. A park with a fountain, playground and popcorn vendor isplayground, and popcorn vendor is better. A library across the street is even better, more so if they feature storytelling hours for kids and exhibits on local history. If there’s a sidewalk café nearby, a bus stop, a bike trail, and an ice cream parlor, then you have what most people would consider a great place Angelica Fortuzzi, PhD / Summer School 2013 people would consider a great place.
    • The power of 10p Aid the community to unfold their potential let everyone to think about what’slet everyone to think about what s special in their communities questions: • How many quality places are located nearby? • and how are they connected? • Are there places that should be more• Are there places that should be more meaningful but aren’t? This helps to focus the community energies. Angelica Fortuzzi, PhD / Summer School 2013
    • 11 Principles 1. The Community Is the Expert The important starting point in developing a concept for any public space isp g p p g p y p p to identify the talents and assets within the community – inviting people into the process - who have an interest or stake in a particular place, such as those who live or work there - is crucial in deciding how to develop or improve a placedevelop or improve a place. In any community there is - historical perspective,p p - valuable insights - how the area functions, - understanding of the critical issuesissues - what is meaningful to people. Angelica Fortuzzi, PhD / Summer School 2013
    • 11 Principles11 Principles 2. You Are Creating a Place, Not Just a DesignDesign Creating a place entails a broader view that goes beyond design; a successful public space possesses four key attributes: accessibilityaccessibility, activities, comfort by physical changes and sociability Goal: create a place with a strong sense of community and a comfortable image, ith tti d ti iti dwith setting and activities and uses Angelica Fortuzzi, PhD / Summer School 2013
    • 11 Principles11 Principles 3. You Can’t Do It Alone A good public space requires moreA good public space requires more resources and expertise than any one individual or organization can offer. 4. They Always Say “It Can’t Be Done” When an idea stretches beyond the reach of an organization and andreach of an organization and and someone says, “It can’t be done,” what that usually means is, “We’ve never done things that way before.” 5. You Can See A Lot Just by Observing When people observe a space theyWhen people observe a space, they learn about how it is actually used, rather than how they think it is used. Angelica Fortuzzi, PhD / Summer School 2013
    • 11 Principles 6. Develop A Vision A vision for a public space should be defined primarily by people who will live, work around, and use the space. 7. Forms Support Function The most successful places grow out ofThe most successful places grow out of understanding what a space needs to offer so that people will use it. By following and incorporating the uses articulated by the community, a designer can not only make the space interesting to look at and be in, but also very functional. 8. Triangulate The concept of triangulation relates to locating elements in such a way that the h f i i i d hchances of activity occurring around them is greatly increased. For example, if a children’s reading room in a new library were located next to a playground in a park with a food kiosk, more activity ld th if th f iliti it d t l Angelica Fortuzzi, PhD / Summer School 2013 would occur than if these facilities were sited separately.
    • 11 Principles 9. Lighter. Quicker. Cheaper. Many great plans become bogged down because they are too big, cost too much, and take too long to happenand take too long to happen. Short-term actions, like planting flowers, can be a way of not only testing ideas, but also giving people the confidence that change isg g p p g occurring and that their ideas matter. 10. Money is Not the Issue All too often the lack of money is used asAll too often, the lack of money is used as an excuse for doing nothing. In fact, too much money often discourages the inventiveness, creativity, and persistencey p required to create a great place. 11. You are never finished About 80% of the success of any public spaceAbout 80% of the success of any public space can be attributed to its management. No matter how good the design of a space is, it will never become a true place unless it is Angelica Fortuzzi, PhD / Summer School 2013 cared for well.
    • place diagram Angelica Fortuzzi, PhD / Summer School 2013
    • Examples of good space according to placemaking approach: Paris (Hazel Borys, www.pps.org) Angelica Fortuzzi, PhD / Summer School 2013
    • Angelica Fortuzzi, PhD / Summer School 2013 Examples of good space according to placemaking approach: Paris (Hazel Borys, www.pps.org)
    • Angelica Fortuzzi, PhD / Summer School 2013 Examples of good space according to placemaking approach: Paris (Hazel Borys, www.pps.org)
    • Angelica Fortuzzi, PhD / Summer School 2013 Examples of good space according to placemaking approach: Paris (Hazel Borys, www.pps.org)
    • Angelica Fortuzzi, PhD / Summer School 2013 Examples of good space according to placemaking approach: Paris (Hazel Borys, www.pps.org)
    • Angelica Fortuzzi, PhD / Summer School 2013 Examples of good space according to placemaking approach: Berlin (Hazel Borys, www.pps.org)
    • Angelica Fortuzzi, PhD / Summer School 2013 Examples of good space according to placemaking approach: Berlin (Hazel Borys, www.pps.org)
    • what’s the purpose ofwhat s the purpose of placemaking in Artena? create spaces with small actions, gradually developedgradually developed, with fractal structure putting the body at the centre goal: healing spaces in healing citieshealing cities Unfold life of the space Angelica Fortuzzi, PhD / Summer School 2013 p
    • REFERENCES • Project for Public Spaces, Placemaking for Communities, www.pps.org • Hazel Borys “Paris: What People Want”• Hazel Borys, Paris: What People Want www.placemakers.com/2013/07/01/paris-what-people-want/ • Hazel Borys, “Berlin’s Cultural Clusters” www.placemakers.com/2013/06/24/berlins-cultural-clusters/ • Jan Gehl, www.gehlarchitects.com • Jane Jacobs, “The Death and Life of Great American Cities”, Vintage, 1992. • William H. Whyte, www.pps.org/reference/wwhyte Angelica Fortuzzi, PhD / Summer School 2013