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Nowruz ppp

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nowroz is a one biggest and most important day for all muslims

nowroz is a one biggest and most important day for all muslims


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  • The thirteenth day celebrations, Seezdah Bedar, stem from the belief of the ancient Persians that the twelve constellations in the Zodiac controlled the months of the year, and each ruled the earth for a thousand years. At the end of which, the sky and the earth collapsed in chaos.
    Hence, Noe-Rooz lasts twelve days and the thirteenth day represents the time of chaos when families put order aside and avoid the bad luck associated with the number thirteen by going outdoors and having picnics and parties.
    On the thirteenth day, families leave their homes and go for a picnic in the countryside. The sabzeh grown for the Haft Sîn (which has symbolically collected all sickness and bad luck) is thrown into running water to exorcise any demons from the household, and the goldfish are also set free.
    Some Nowruz celebrants believe that whatever a person does on Nowruz will affect the rest of the year. So, if a person is warm and kind to their relatives, friends and neighbours on Nowruz, then the new year will be a good one. On the other hand, if there are fights and disagreements, the year will be a bad one
    One tradition associated with the 13th day is Dorugh-e Sizdah, (meaning “the lie of the thirteenth”) where people tell a fib to one another, making them believe it, similar to April Fools Day.
    It is also customary for young single women to tie the leaves of the sabzeh, prior to discarding it, symbolizing their wish to be married before the next year's Seezdah Bedar. When tying the leaves, they whisper.
  • The thirteenth day celebrations, Seezdah Bedar, stem from the belief of the ancient Persians that the twelve constellations in the Zodiac controlled the months of the year, and each ruled the earth for a thousand years. At the end of which, the sky and the earth collapsed in chaos.
    Hence, Noe-Rooz lasts twelve days and the thirteenth day represents the time of chaos when families put order aside and avoid the bad luck associated with the number thirteen by going outdoors and having picnics and parties.
    On the thirteenth day, families leave their homes and go for a picnic in the countryside. The sabzeh grown for the Haft Sîn (which has symbolically collected all sickness and bad luck) is thrown into running water to exorcise any demons from the household, and the goldfish are also set free.
    Some Nowruz celebrants believe that whatever a person does on Nowruz will affect the rest of the year. So, if a person is warm and kind to their relatives, friends and neighbours on Nowruz, then the new year will be a good one. On the other hand, if there are fights and disagreements, the year will be a bad one
    One tradition associated with the 13th day is Dorugh-e Sizdah, (meaning “the lie of the thirteenth”) where people tell a fib to one another, making them believe it, similar to April Fools Day.
    It is also customary for young single women to tie the leaves of the sabzeh, prior to discarding it, symbolizing their wish to be married before the next year's Seezdah Bedar. When tying the leaves, they whisper.
  • Transcript

    • 1. www.portsmouth.gov.uk1
    • 2. www.portsmouth.gov.uk Nowruz Persian New Year now (Old Persian nava) means "new“ ruz means "day" EMA Portsmouth 2012
    • 3. www.portsmouth.gov.uk Some of the countries that celebrate Nowruz
    • 4. www.portsmouth.gov.uk4 When is Nowruz? Nowruz is celebrated on the first day of the Spring. It usually occurs on March 21st (but sometimes the day before or after(. The moment the Sun crosses the equator, when night and day are equal, Iranian families gather together to observe the Nowruz rituals. However, the Kurdish people always celebrate the new year on the 21st March every year.
    • 5. www.portsmouth.gov.uk5 Nowruz has been celebrated for at least 3,000 years. It is deeply rooted in the rituals and traditions of the Zoroastrian religion.
    • 6. www.portsmouth.gov.uk Chahārshanbe-Sūri (in Persian: ‌‫سوری‬‌‫ه‬‫چهارشنب‬ ) meaning Wednesday Feast also called the Festival of Fire • Bonfires are lit in public places, hoping for enlightenment and happiness throughout the coming year. • People leap over the flames, shouting: ‘Sorkhi-ye to az man; Zardi-ye man az to’ (Give me your beautiful red colour; and take back my sickly pallor)
    • 7. www.portsmouth.gov.uk • Another tradition of this day is to make special ajeel, (mixed nuts and berries). • People wear disguises and go door to door knocking on doors as similar to Trick-or-treating. 7
    • 8. www.portsmouth.gov.uk8 In the run up to Nowruz Houses are spring cleaned and filled with flowers (in particular hyacinths tulips and daffodils( This symbolises the rebirth of nature It is also customary to buy at least one new outfit for the New Year celebrations
    • 9. www.portsmouth.gov.uk9 On the first day of Nowruz Families gather around a table to wait for the exact moment of the arrival of the spring when they exchange gifts. On the table will be the Haft Sîn which consists of seven specific items beginning with the letter ‘S’ : • Sumaq – sumac berries – for the colour of sunrise • Seer – garlic – for medicine • Sonbol – apples – for beauty and health • Serkeh – vinegar – for age and patience. • Samanoo – a sweet wheat germ pudding – for affluence • Senjed – the dried fruit of the lotus tree – for love • Sabzeh – grown wheat, barley or lentil sprouts in a dish – for rebirth
    • 10. www.portsmouth.gov.uk Other things that may be on the table include • coins (for wealth), • candles (enlightenment and happiness), • a mirror (cleanness and honesty), • decorated eggs (fertility), • a goldfish in a bowl (said to represent unexpected favours to be received in the coming year), • rosewater (believed to have magical cleansing powers), • and a holy book and/or a poetry book. 10
    • 11. www.portsmouth.gov.uk11 • Nowruz lasts for twelve days and the thirteenth day represents the time of chaos when families put order aside and avoid the bad luck associated with the number thirteen. • On the thirteenth day, families leave their homes and go for a picnic in the country side. The thirteenth day of the New Year festival is called Sizdah Bedar (meaning ‘thirteen outdoors’).
    • 12. www.portsmouth.gov.uk The thirteenth day of the New Year festival is called Sizdah Bedar (meaning ‘thirteen outdoors’). • Some people believe that if a person is warm and kind to their relatives, friends and neighbours on Nowruz, then the new year will be a good one. On the other hand, if there are fights and disagreements, the year will be a bad one • One tradition associated with the 13th day is Dorugh-e Sizdah, (meaning “the lie of the thirteenth”) where people tell a fib to one another, similar to April Fools Day. 12
    • 13. www.portsmouth.gov.uk13 Sabzeh Sizdah Bedar often falls on or very close to April Fool's Day. It is also customary for young single women to tie the leaves of the sabzeh, prior to discarding it, symbolizing their wish to be married before the next year's Sizdah Bedar
    • 14. www.portsmouth.gov.uk14 Traditional New Year Food Traditional Iranian pastries such as baghlava, toot, naan- nokhodchi are always available to visitors. New Year dishes include: Sabzi Polo Mahi Baghlava Sabzi Polo Mahi
    • 15. www.portsmouth.gov.uk More Food Dolme Barg Kookoo sabzi 15 Kookoo sabzi
    • 16. www.portsmouth.gov.uk Some New Year greetings Sale no mobarak is Happy New Year in Farsi Nevruz kutlu olsun is Happy New Year in Turkish Newroz piroz be is Welcome life in Kurdish 16
    • 17. www.portsmouth.gov.uk 17