Transitions: Paper is literally a path…a path through the evolution of your thought. Like any
trip, we need markers to let...
analysis, to summarize, to sum up
Qualifiers also describe the limits of a claim.
Arguers must qualify their claims by:
1)...
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Transitions and Qualifiers: A Heuristic Approach

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Purposefully use transitions with this heuristic that offers a comprehensive list of transitions and the relationships they illustrate.

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Transitions and Qualifiers: A Heuristic Approach

  1. 1. Transitions: Paper is literally a path…a path through the evolution of your thought. Like any trip, we need markers to let us know where we have been and where we are going. Stop signs, street lights, even advertising markers for attractions. Transitions should be used purposefully, so you will need to consider which ones will most precisely articulate the relationship between your ideas. 1. Spatio-Temporal: These demonstrate connections based on time, consequence, and proximity. ● Sequence: First, Next, Third, Finally, ● Sequence: After, Before, Immediately, Later, Meanwhile, Occasionally, Soon (All paragraphs point toward a central thing from which they emerge) ● Consequence: Consequently, Since, Thus, Therefore, By consequence, As a result (something is interdependent on what came before or what comes after) ● Proximity: Above, adjacent, adjoining, beyond, far, here, near, there (These are likely to function as prepositions too) 2. Evaluative: These indicate that your paragraph is demonstrating or proving something is true, in terms of its scope and scale. ● Attribution: Citing an authority, Introducing evidence: X states, Y points out, X opines, Y notes, X argues ● Purpose: in order that, in order to, intending to, so that ● Illustration: For example, For instance, Specifically, to Demonstrate ● Emphasis: by all means, certainly, indeed, in fact, no doubt, of course, surely ● Comparison/Contrast: In contrast, However, Nevertheless, Similarly, Likewise, Since, but, conversely, despite, on the other hand, comparably, in the same way, likewise, similarly ● Counter-Argument: granted that, naturally, of course, to be sure ● Reinforce or intensify a point: Moreover, Furthermore, Additionally, In addition, again, also, and, as well, besides ● Clarification: i.e., in other words, that is to say, to put it another way ● Summarize: In sum, In conclusion, As a result, briefly, in the final
  2. 2. analysis, to summarize, to sum up Qualifiers also describe the limits of a claim. Arguers must qualify their claims by: 1) explaining under which circumstances the claim is true 2) estimating the probability that a claim is true Circumstantial Qualifiers absolutely probably possibly most of the time seldom regularly never usually generally least Probability Qualifiers occasionally always sometimes as a rule typically hardly ever potentially tentatively often frequently

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