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Learning in the Modern Workplace
Learning in the Modern Workplace
Learning in the Modern Workplace
Learning in the Modern Workplace
Learning in the Modern Workplace
Learning in the Modern Workplace
Learning in the Modern Workplace
Learning in the Modern Workplace
Learning in the Modern Workplace
Learning in the Modern Workplace
Learning in the Modern Workplace
Learning in the Modern Workplace
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Learning in the Modern Workplace

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Slides of my talk at the Social Networks in Learning seminar, Doctoral Summer School, Athabasca University, Edmonton, Canada (24/06/10)

Slides of my talk at the Social Networks in Learning seminar, Doctoral Summer School, Athabasca University, Edmonton, Canada (24/06/10)

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  1. learning in the modern workplace Anoush Margaryan Lecturer in Learning Technology Caledonian Academy, Glasgow Caledonian University ,UK This presentation is licensed under Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial-Share Alike 3.0 Unported Licence
  2. “ Today productivity, wealth and the creation of social surpluses take the form of cooperative interactivity through linguistic, communicational, and affective networks . In the expression of its own creative energies, immaterial labour thus seems to provide the potential for a kind of spontaneous and elementary communism” (Hardt & Negri, Empire, 2001, p. 294).
  3. Fordism -> Toyotism -> Wikinomics
  4. “ The labour of information production relies on what we can call abstract cooperation . Such labour dedicates an even more central role to communication of knowledge and information among workers, but those cooperating workers need not be present and can even be relatively unknown to one another, or known only through the productive information exchanged ” (Hardt & Negri, Empire, 2001, p. 296)
  5. “ Anyone today who diagnoses collapse without new openings is blind. And anyone who speaks of new openings without recognising the collapse is naive” (Beck, The Brave New World of Work, 2000, p. 18)
  6. “ Our work may still largely define who we are, but employers no longer will. Our sense of stability and our source of encouragement, learning and growth in our careers will come from our engagement with like-minded peers who we meet and keep in touch with online and not necessarily our long-term employment relationships. Rather the people we meet at work join the personal networks we create as we move from organisation to organisation over the life span of our careers” (Tapscott and Williams, Wikinomics, 2006, p. 266)
  7. “ Now, we own the means of production--it's in our heads. It's what we know and can do. Do we really want to turn that over to the organization to decide? Or do we want to be the people who say `I'm going to take charge of my own learning. I'm going to be curious and pay attention to what's changing and where things are going and I'm going to pro-actively prepare myself for those things, regardless of whether or not the organization tells me I need to learn this.` We shouldn't be waiting to receive permission or be empowered. We should be seizing that power and doing everything with it that we can “ Michelle Martin, The Bamboo Project
  8. Capabilities for ‘being in charge’ of one’s own learning
  9.  
  10. “ Education should above all consist in learning how to learn independently and eventually in unlearning . The former is arguably not even possible in any meaningful and substantive way without the latter, and the latter is stronger and far more demanding that what is usually meant by ‘critical thinking’ “ (Chokr, Unlearning or How not to be governed, 2009, p.6)
  11. “ As a preliminary characterisation, I would say that it consists in being moved by the desire and wilful determination not to be taken in . Ultimately it is about unshackling oneself . It is about emancipating or l iberating oneself from variously entrenched and often unquestioned ways of thinking and doing by radically questioning, criticizing and rejecting the assumptions and premises of much of what one has learned as part of the dominant and established system of knowledge” (ibid)
  12. What capabilities do individuals require to operate in a networked learning context ? How do they develop these capabilities?  What are the consequences of not developing these capabilities?

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