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UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings
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UXPA 2013: Effectively Communicating User Research Findings

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Communicating user research findings effectively so that people can understand them, believe them, and know how to act on the recommendations can be challenging. You may feel that you’ve delivered a …

Communicating user research findings effectively so that people can understand them, believe them, and know how to act on the recommendations can be challenging. You may feel that you’ve delivered a successful presentation, but later you find that the recommendations aren’t acted upon. Ideally, our clients are as interested in our user research findings and recommendations as we are and find them valuable, but without the proper understanding, clients can express a variety of negative reactions. This presentation will discuss best practices in communicating user research findings to avoid these problems and to lead to better outcomes.

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  • My record, a 106 page usability testing report.
  • Not quite an Executive summary, is it?Working on this presentation and reviewing a lot of my past deliverables, I found a lot of mistakes, like this, that I made.
  • Any good war stories – unusual things that have happened?
  • This often happens when you have people observing testing. They discuss the findings as they happen, make conclusions, and decide on changes – often while you’re still testing.
  • [Ask the audience and raise my own hand]
  • [Ask the audience and raise my own hand]
  • [Ask the audience and raise my own hand]
  • [Ask the audience and raise my own hand]
  • [Ask the audience and raise my own hand]
  • Of course, if you’re writing and presenting, you need good writing skills and good presentation skills.These are very important, but we could spend hours talking about each of these.
  • Before we talk about creating effective research deliverables, let’s first look at what can go wrong.
  • Ideally the reactions are positive.This was the highest compliment I received from a client after viewing a particularly controversial presentation.
  • Because we deliver bad news and focus on the negative, people can get defensive.
  • Here are some negative reactions I’ve encounteredIt’s a good idea to anticipate and know how to prevent or deal with these reactions
  • Some people are impatient and just want to see the designs.Have you ever found that you’re the person in the room most interested in the research findings?
  • Research, analysis, and creating the deliverable takes a lot of time.Without frequent communication or involvementThey can become impatient and anxious about not seeing any designs yet. What have you been doing all this time?
  • Show examples of the research deliverables
  • They spent all this money to have you tell them what they already knew.“Well then why didn’t you do something about it?”
  • Why this happens:They may have known these things on some level, but didn’t have them fully formed in their minds until they saw your deliverable.It’s rare that research reveals completely new information that no one knew.Although people may have known the information, there’s great value in gathering, organizing, and formally documenting the information.People don’t understand that the purpose of research is not to educate the clients, it’s to educate the designers and project team. The clients may have already known that information, but the designers have to know it.
  • Clarify to clients at the beginning of the project and in deliverables:Maybe you know this information, but we need to know it firsthand.There’s value in gathering, organizing, and publishing it in official documentation that can be used for this project and future projects.Explain the value that you bring to the findings. You don’t just report directly what you hear and observe.
  • You say that managers can’t approve multiple items at a time.Someone pounces – You’re wrong! You can approve multiple items, you just have to…
  • Assume that you’re supposed to be a subject-matter expert or that you’ll become one as part of the research.What participants tell you and show you is not “correct.” So by relying on them, some of your findings may be “incorrect.”Or they pounce on you because your recommendation obviously can’t be done in the current technology.You can’t double check and verify every reported issue.
  • Participants’ incorrect assumptions can reveal important insights. For example, a participant may tell you that there’s no way to perform a certain function in an application. That function may exist, but they just don’t know about it, which indicates a problem in itself. Explain that research findings are iterative, you welcome feedback and clarification, and you can make revisions as neededIf something isn’t technically feasible, let’s work together to find a solution that does work
  • “We can do that ourselves. We’re not potted plants!” was the reaction I received from an executive.
  • We make it look easy – anyone can observe people and ask questionsSure, they could take time to learn about it and eventually do it themselvesMost end up doing the typical BA requirements gathering – asking people what they want
  • Ideally, the quality and depth of your findings will speak for themselvesYou bring your skills - you don’t just observe, ask questions, and report back
  • “What about the other 10,000 users,” some clients ask. I’d like to say, “Okay, do you have hundreds of millions of dollars and a few years to spend doing research with all those people?” What do they propose as an alternative then? Do research with all 10,000 or do nothing?
  • Clients who are used to surveys and statistical significance. Don’t understand qualitative researchUnder the misconception that research involves asking people what they want.
  • And why qualitative research necessitates small numbers of participantsIt’s about seeing patternsGive some good analogies and examples“Tripping over a rug”
  • When a participant doesn’t fit in people’s preconceived notions or brings up something they don’t want to believe. The easiest thing is to dismiss them as not a typical user.
  • If you don’t like the bad news, it’s easy to dismiss it by blaming the participants that were recruited.
  • They can’t as easily argue with the participant selection if they were part of the recruiting.Video clips reinforce that a reaction wasn’t isolated to one odd participant
  • For example, I didn’t mention the annoying horizontal scrolling in a reporting application in my contextual inquiry findings. It wasn’t necessary to get into obvious, usability details for field studies.We were focusing on higher level issues.
  • For example, usability testing will provide detailed, interface-specific findings, but field studies will result in higher-level findings such as user characteristics, user needs, tasks, and the problems they face.
  • But complex problems often require additional research or design exploration to solve. There isn’t always an easy solution that you can describe in text in a report or presentation.
  • Even lazier is the reaction, “It’s a communication issue.” People don’t need to be trained, they just need to be told how to do something.
  • It’s best to first make the interface as intuitive and as easy to learn as possible to minimize the need for training.Usability problems only need to be fixed once, while training is a continuous process that can become expensive.
  • Keep your recommendations flexible. Instead of just dismissing the recommendation completely. Try to find a solution that works around the issue.
  • Misunderstandings about the purpose of user research, what it involves, and the results it provides. Clearly explain the user research at the start of the project.Provide informal updates throughout the project. Don’t wait until the deliverable
  • There are many different types of deliverables. Which to choose depends on several factors.
  • Interface-related issues (usability testing, heuristic evaluation, expert review) are best explained in a visual format, like a presentation or annotated designs that can show screens and directly point to problems
  • Field StudiesMore about user behavior, characteristics, goals, needs, etc.Not specific about an interface. Less visual.May need to provide more detailReport, personas, diagrams, etc.
  • You often have to serve a variety of audiences. High-level executives want an overview.Production-level people (designers and developers) need to know the details to design and implement the solutions.You may need to provide more than one deliverable or allow for progressive disclosure.
  • Determines the formalityClients need a more formal deliverable, whereas you can be more informal with an internal team.
  • Less time – more high-level and more informal deliverable. Suitable for quick rounds of iterative design and research.
  • More time – more detailed and more formal deliverable. Suitable when there’s no specific deadline – as in exploratory research, provide a lot of time.
  • After you deliver the research findings, will you remain on as a member of the design team? If so, you can provide the knowledge. People don’t have to rely on the deliverable.
  • Or will you go away, and the deliverable will remain as the holder of the research knowledge? If so, you need a more comprehensive, detailed research deliverable.
  • There are various types of deliverables, from no deliverable at all to a full report. You should choose the deliverable that best allows you to communicate your findings and recommendations in the time available and considers the needs of your audience.
  • If the right people are involved throughout the research, a deliverable may not be necessary.You can do a group analysis and discussion, without creating a deliverable.They learn about the research findings and recommendations first-hand.
  • No one can refer to the research for questions or future projects.What happens when people leave? If the knowledge is only in their heads.Have you ever had to take over a project from another researcher? It’s hard to catch up without documentation. Looking at a bunch of random notes in notebooks and spreadsheets and various places isn’t the same as being able to refer to a deliverable
  • People call this various names – top-line report, summary of findings, etc.You do a quick analysis and produce an informal document with headings and bullet points describing the overall findings and recommendationsTo produce quick findingsGo through your discussion guide and write down your overall conclusions from each task or question. You’ll be surprised how much you remember off the top of your head.
  • Details can get lost, since they’re not documented anywhere.You may make conclusions based on a quick, high-level analysis and miss things
  • It’s easier to explain and for the audience to understand problems by pointing to them on an image.
  • It doesn’t work for research such as field studies in which the information is more about people and their tasksIt’s more difficult to present than a PowerPoint presentation – you can’t just read through it, but you can summarize
  • Best format to explain complex issuesSomeone who wasn’t in the presentation can read the report and understand the research. Someone joining a project later can get up to speed.Long after much of the information is forgotten, a report lives on and can be referred back to. It can be printed and it tends to stick around, whereas digital documents tend to get forgotten.A high-level PowerPoint or a brief summary of findings usually doesn’t cut it. The hearty thwack that comes from slapping down a thick report on a conference room table is impressive, even if no one reads it. To some people, a hefty and detailed report says, “Here’s some impressive, comprehensive research. We got our money’s worth on this one.”
  • People think of reports as these long, text-based documents, but they can really be a container for anything.
  • People assume they’ll be long and boring (even if they aren’t) and don’t want to read them. A presentation, you’re given the information in a specific period of time. You have to make an extra effort to read a report. And people are busy.You can’t present a report, yet you need to present something. So you end up creating both a report and a presentation, which takes even longer.Clients often want to save money by eliminating reports
  • A presentation can either accompany another deliverable (such as a report), or it can be the only deliverable.
  • It makes sense when you present it, but it doesn’t necessarily make sense to those who weren’t at the presentation.
  • It doesn’t have to try to contain all the details. It can leave the details for the report.Those who want more detail can refer to the report.Those who miss the presentation can read the report.
  • Takes more time and is more expensivePeople often don’t read a report after attending the presentation. So they don’t learn the things that aren’t in the presentation. So be sure to include the most important information in the presentation, and indicate at the end what other information exists in the report.
  • Has to do a lot more explaining to make sense as the only deliverable.
  • More people are likely to attend a presentation than to read a report
  • It’s difficult for presentations to contain enough detail to be understood on its own later and also be an ideal format for presenting.The extra explanatory text that makes a presentation understandable on its own doesn’t necessarily make a presentation a compelling experience when you deliver it to an audience.
  • Leaving out information means things can get lost, findings and recommendations can get misinterpreted
  • Provide an appendix of additional material that you don’t present but leave at the end of the presentation for people to read later.
  • Provide an appendix of additional material that you don’t present but leave at the end of the presentation for people to read later.
  • Create a version that you presentAnd another that you leave behind to read later and for those who didn’t attend the presentation
  • Create a version that’s ideal for presenting Record the presentation with Morae or Camtasia, which records the screen, your narration, and the video/audio clips; so that others can view the presentation later and get all the details as if they were at the initial presentation.
  • Annotated designs allow you to provide more detail
  • Once your audience has the initial understanding, all the extra context and examples get in the way when project teams simply want to view and discuss your recommendationsFindings and Recommendations MatrixProvides an easy way to go through the list of recommendations in a table (Word or Excel)Can just focus on the recommendationCan see the priorityOr review a summary of the findings that led to that recommendation
  • Easier to write than a report
  • These are sometimes better ways to explain and explore the findings besides simply using text or verbal description.
  • They usually don’t stand alone. So a report or presentation is usually also necessary.
  • If necessary – ask show of hands for reports, presentations, both
  • Regardless of the type of deliverable you provide, there are things you can do create effective deliverables
  • Without a template, it’s easy to waste a lot of time futzing around with formatting. You end up re-creating the wheel every time.It’s also good to maintain consistency.
  • It could be a great deliverable, but if it looks boring and cumbersome to read, fewer people will read it.Looking good isn’t enough, but it’s a start to get people to begin reading it or begin paying attention.
  • It could be a great deliverable, but if it looks boring and cumbersome to read, fewer people will read it.Looking good isn’t enough, but it’s a start to get people to begin reading it or begin paying attention.
  • It’s easy to overlook and think that everyone understands the methods.Even if you’ve already explained it:People forgetSome never understood it in the first placeSome weren’t involved earlier in the project. Some will read it later and need to understand
  • Our goal is to improve the UX, we’re often negative – finding problemsWe take the positive aspects for grantedCan be depressing and defeating for the audienceBalance the negative with some positiveExplain why you focus more on the negative
  • Use visuals to help the audience understand the findings – screenshots, diagrams, illustrations, charts, etc.They also break up the text, making the deliverable appear more interesting and less intimidating to read
  • Use visuals to help the audience understand the findings – screenshots, diagrams, illustrations, charts, etc.They also break up the text, making the deliverable appear more interesting and less intimidating to read
  • Use visuals to help the audience understand the findings – screenshots, diagrams, illustrations, charts, etc.They also break up the text, making the deliverable appear more interesting and less intimidating to read
  • Use visuals to help the audience understand the findings – screenshots, diagrams, illustrations, charts, etc.They also break up the text, making the deliverable appear more interesting and less intimidating to read
  • The environment, documents, tools, signage, and other physical aspects you encountered
  • Participants say things that we could never say.And they often have far more impact than we would have saying something general like, “The participants don’t like using the application.”
  • It’s easy to get carried away when you have many really great quotes.If you have too many quotes, it’s overwhelming. People won’t read them and they lose their impact.
  • You have more room in reports to include multiple, longer quotes.
  • People stop and read the quotes.Do you read the quotes to them, or do you pause and let them read them? Either way is awkward.If you have many quotes, create two versions of the presentation. One to present with only a few quotes, and one with more quotes as a read-only version.
  • If you have many quotes, create two versions of the presentation. One to present with only a few quotes, and one with more quotes as a read-only version.
  • When you can, it’s usually much more effective to show participants saying and doing things themselves.Especially for controversial findings. Difficult to argue with.
  • Difficult to describe complex design changes with text alone. Leaves room for misinterpretation.Can do this by making simple changes to a screenshot
  • Show examples from other interfaces that do what you’re recommending.
  • Show examples from other interfaces that do what you’re recommending.
  • Prioritize the recommendations – as shown in a findings and recommendations matrixOtherwise, people can be overwhelmed with the number of changes to makeWhen I was new to the field, I thought that clients should fix everything – why wouldn’t they fix it?Clients have a limited amount of time, money, and resources. Point out where they should focus first?
  • And give them a plan to implement the recommendationsWithout a plan, it’s easy for items to get shelved and eventually forgotten
  • Guide them on any additional research or design steps they need to take next.
  • It’s always good to get a second opinion.Get feedback from someone on your project team to ensure that your deliverable is understandable.Get a content review from a writer or editor. Not just proofreading, but ensuring that you have a well-balanced, persuasive piece of work.
  • Get feedback from someone on your project team to ensure that your deliverable is understandable.Get a content review from a writer or editor. Not just proofreading, but ensuring that you have a well-balanced, persuasive piece of work.
  • Decision makers – those with the power to make sure things get doneThe doers – those who will actually implement the recommendationsThose who don’t attend, probably won’t read the deliverable later.
  • This presentation is about effectively communicating user research findings. So we assume that means deliverables, but there are other ways to communicate user research findings.
  • “Deliverable” implies that the researcher:Conducts the research alone, while the client/project team waitsDelivers the findings and recommendationsGoes away, leaving the client/project team to implement the recommendations.
  • Few people will reread them after you’re gone.It’s easy to forget about or misinterpret recommendations.
  • Involving the project team and clients in the research gives them:More empathyA deeper understandingBetterappreciation of the findingsA stronger sense of responsibility to solve the problems
  • PlanningParticipants to recruitQuestions to ask, things to observe, ask the team what they want to knowHave them review and provide feedback on the discussion guide
  • PlanningParticipants to recruitQuestions to ask, things to observe, ask the team what they want to knowHave them review and provide feedback on the discussion guide
  • PlanningParticipants to recruitQuestions to ask, things to observe, ask the team what they want to knowHave them review and provide feedback on the discussion guide
  • Even something short and high-level
  • Transcript

    • 1. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings UXPA 2013 - UX Fundamentals track Presented by Jim Ross Principal of Research & Strategy Electronic Ink @anotheruxguy © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. 10 July 2013 Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 1
    • 2. Why this topic? Why talk about communicating user research findings? © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 2
    • 3. Why this topic? Anyone can write a report, right? © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 3
    • 4. Why this topic? Anyone can create a PowerPoint presentation, right? © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 4
    • 5. Why this topic? Have you ever given a presentation when it seems like everything goes right… © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 5
    • 6. Why this topic? But few of your recommendations are implemented. © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 6
    • 7. Why this topic? Or no one reads your long report. © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 7
    • 8. Why this topic? Or your presentation puts the audience to sleep. © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 8
    • 9. Why this topic? You’re wrong! We already knew that! We could have done that ourselves! Source: Flickr – CT State Library Or you don’t get the reaction you expect. © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 9
    • 10. Why this topic? Source: Flickr – Blue Oxen Associates 2009 Or they make changes instead of waiting for your deliverable. © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 10
    • 11. Why this topic? Or you hand off the deliverable and leave the project, and everyone interprets the research any way they wish. © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 11
    • 12. Why this topic? Communicating user research findings effectively can be challenging. © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 12
    • 13. Why this topic? Communicating user research findings effectively can be challenging. • Raise your hand if you’ve ever… © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 13
    • 14. Why this topic? Communicating user research findings effectively can be challenging. • Raise your hand if you’ve ever… - Written a long, boring report © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 14
    • 15. Why this topic? Communicating user research findings effectively can be challenging. • Raise your hand if you’ve ever… - Written a long, boring report Given a long, boring presentation © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 15
    • 16. Why this topic? To communicate user research findings effectively , you have to: • Explain • Educate • Entertain • Persuade • Guide © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 16
    • 17. Why this topic? What we’ll talk about • Handling audience reactions to deliverables • How to choose the best deliverable format • Advantages and disadvantages of different types of research deliverables • Tips for creating effective research deliverables • Communicating research beyond deliverables © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 17
    • 18. Why this topic? What we won’t talk about • Writing skills • Presentation skills © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 18
    • 19. Why this topic? Who am I to talk about this? • 13 years of experience as a UX researcher and designer • Created many deliverables • Made many mistakes • Learned many lessons © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 19
    • 20. Audience reactions to deliverables. © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 20
    • 21. Audience reactions to deliverables Positive reactions • “This is great, but if I presented this to our executives, it would be like setting off a bomb in the room.” – Client © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 21
    • 22. Audience reactions to deliverables Unfortunately, we don’t always get ideal reactions. © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 22
    • 23. Audience reactions to deliverables Negative reactions • • • • • • • • • • Yeah yeah fine, now where are the designs? We already knew that! We could have done that ourselves. You’re wrong! Why didn’t you mention this problem? These recommendations aren’t specific enough. But you only talked with 12 people. Where did you get these participants? That’s a training issue. We can’t fix that. © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 23
    • 24. Audience reactions to deliverables Yeah yeah fine, now where are the designs? © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 24
    • 25. Audience reactions to deliverables Yeah yeah fine, now where are the designs? Why you get this reaction • The time between the kickoff and the research deliverables is long. • Uninvolved client/team members become impatient and anxious. © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 25
    • 26. Audience reactions to deliverables Yeah yeah fine, now where are the designs? How to prevent this reaction • Set expectations about the research activities at the kickoff meeting. • Keep the client/project team involved. • Provide frequent updates. © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 26
    • 27. Audience reactions to deliverables We already knew that! © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 27
    • 28. Audience reactions to deliverables We already knew that! Why you get this reaction • They usually do know much of the information. • Research findings often sound like obvious, common sense. • They misunderstand the purpose of research. © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 28
    • 29. Audience reactions to deliverables We already knew that! How to prevent this reaction • Clarify to clients: - You may already know a lot of this information, but it’s important for the design team to understand it. - There’s value in gathering, validating, and publishing this information. - You bring value through your analysis and expert, outside perspective. © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 29
    • 30. Audience reactions to deliverables You’re wrong! © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 30
    • 31. Audience reactions to deliverables You’re wrong! Why you get this reaction • You report the participants’ “incorrect” beliefs. • They think you’re supposed to be a subject-matter expert. • You’ve revealed your technology ignorance. © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 31
    • 32. Audience reactions to deliverables You’re wrong! How to prevent this reaction • Clarify the need for everyone to combine their expertise: - You’re a user experience expert. - Clients are business and subject matter experts. - Users are experts in their own needs. © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 32
    • 33. Audience reactions to deliverables You’re wrong! How to prevent this reaction • Explain that - “Incorrect” information is valuable. - Research findings are iterative, and you welcome clarifications. © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 33
    • 34. Audience reactions to deliverables We could have done that ourselves! © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 34
    • 35. Audience reactions to deliverables We could have done that ourselves! Why you get this reaction • Findings often seem like common sense. • We make it seem easy – anyone can watch people and ask questions. © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 35
    • 36. Audience reactions to deliverables We could have done that ourselves! How to handle this reaction • Turn it around on them: “Then why haven’t you?” • Remind them why they haven’t done it themselves: - Lack of time - Lack of knowledge and skills - Lack of outside perspective © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 36
    • 37. Audience reactions to deliverables But you only talked with 12 people. © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 37
    • 38. Audience reactions to deliverables But you only talked with 12 people. Why you get this reaction • They’re more familiar with quantitative research. • They don’t understand qualitative research. © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 38
    • 39. Audience reactions to deliverables But you only talked with 12 people. How to prevent this reaction • Explain at the beginning of the project: - The difference between qualitative and quantitative research - The value of observing behavior © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 39
    • 40. Audience reactions to deliverables Where did you get these participants? © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 40
    • 41. Audience reactions to deliverables Where did you get these participants? Why you get this reaction • We deliver bad news. • It’s easier to blame the participants than to believe the bad news. © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 41
    • 42. Audience reactions to deliverables Where did you get these participants? How to prevent this reaction • Involve the client and project team in recruiting by having them: - Provide input on the types of people to recruit - Approve the screener - Approve the list of recruited participants • Use video clips of multiple participants with the same reaction. © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 42
    • 43. Audience reactions to deliverables Why didn’t you mention this problem? © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 43
    • 44. Audience reactions to deliverables Why didn’t you mention this problem? Why you get this reaction • You didn’t specifically mention someone’s pet-peeve. • They don’t understand the types of findings different research methods provide. © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 44
    • 45. Audience reactions to deliverables Why didn’t you mention this problem? How to prevent this reaction • At the beginning of the project, explain the types of findings your research will provide. - For example, usability testing versus field studies © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 45
    • 46. Audience reactions to deliverables These recommendations aren’t specific enough. © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 46
    • 47. Audience reactions to deliverables These recommendations aren’t specific enough. Why you get this reaction • Some expect a specific, actionable recommendation for each problem. • But that’s not always possible or appropriate in a research deliverable. © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 47
    • 48. Audience reactions to deliverables These recommendations aren’t specific enough. How to prevent this reaction • Explain up front that - Some recommendations will be specific and actionable. - Others will be general and may require more research or design exploration. - It’s important not to prematurely box in the design direction. © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 48
    • 49. Audience reactions to deliverables That’s a training issue. © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 49
    • 50. Audience reactions to deliverables That’s a training issue. Why you get this reaction • It seems like an easy way to get out of fixing problems. • It seems easier to change people than to change technology. © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 50
    • 51. Audience reactions to deliverables That’s a training issue. How to handle this reaction • Explain that - Usability minimizes the need for training. - Usability problems only need to be fixed once, while training is ongoing. - Training doesn’t solve inefficiency of use. - Training doesn’t help infrequent users. - It’s easier to change technology than to change people. © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 51
    • 52. Audience reactions to deliverables We can’t fix that. © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 52
    • 53. Audience reactions to deliverables We can’t fix that. Why you get this reaction • The same issues that caused the problem remain in the way of fixing it. - Technical issues - Regulatory and legal issues - Conflict with business goals - Organizational turf - Executive whims © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 53
    • 54. Audience reactions to deliverables We can’t fix that. How to prevent this reaction • Consult your own technical resources. • Present to the decision makers. • Keep your recommendations flexible. © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 54
    • 55. Audience reactions to deliverables Your experience • What kinds of negative reactions have you received? • How did you handle those? © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 55
    • 56. Audience reactions to deliverables The overall lessons • Negative reactions arise from misunderstandings. • Set the right expectations from the beginning. • Communicate throughout the project. © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 56
    • 57. Choosing a deliverable format. © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 57
    • 58. Choosing a deliverable format Considerations • What type of research was it? • Who is the audience? • Will you remain on the project or go away? • How soon do they need the findings? © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 58
    • 59. Choosing a deliverable format What type of research was it? • Interface-related (usability testing, expert review, etc.)? © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 59
    • 60. Choosing a deliverable format What type of research was it? • Or field studies? © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 60
    • 61. Choosing a deliverable format Who is the audience? • High-level executives or designers/developers? © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 61
    • 62. Choosing a deliverable format Who is the audience? • A client or an internal project team? © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 62
    • 63. Choosing a deliverable format How soon do they need the findings? • As soon as possible? © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 63
    • 64. Choosing a deliverable format How soon do they need the findings? • Or no rush? © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 64
    • 65. Choosing a deliverable format Will you remain on the project? • The deliverable can be more high-level. © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 65
    • 66. Choosing a deliverable format Or will you deliver the findings and go away? • The deliverable has to be detailed and clear enough to stand in for you. © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 66
    • 67. Types of research deliverables. Advantages and disadvantages © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 67
    • 68. Types of research deliverables • No deliverable at all • Quick findings • Annotated designs • Reports • Presentations • Findings and Recommendations Matrix • Other types of deliverables: personas, scenarios, workflow diagrams, etc. © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 68
    • 69. Types of research deliverables No deliverable at all © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 69
    • 70. Types of research deliverables No deliverable at all Advantages • Saves time and money • Encourages team participation in the research through: - Observation - Collaborative analysis and discussion © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 70
    • 71. Types of research deliverables No deliverable at all Disadvantages • No documentation for future use • Knowledge only exists in people’s heads • Nothing tangible to show for the research © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 71
    • 72. Types of research deliverables Quick findings © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 72
    • 73. Types of research deliverables Quick findings Advantages • Saves time and money • Can discuss findings soon after research • Ideal for quick iteration • Some documentation exists for future reference © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 73
    • 74. Types of research deliverables Quick findings Disadvantages • No detailed analysis • Findings remain high-level • Details can get lost © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 74
    • 75. Types of research deliverables Annotated designs © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 75
    • 76. Types of research deliverables Annotated designs Advantages • Combines the best aspects of reports and presentations - Visual - Explains problems more clearly by pointing to them - Appears more approachable and less dense than a report © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 76
    • 77. Types of research deliverables Annotated designs Advantages • Combines the best aspects of reports and presentations - Text - Provides more explanation than a presentation - Stands on its own as a deliverable and makes sense later © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 77
    • 78. Types of research deliverables Annotated designs Disadvantages • Only suitable for interface-related findings • Difficult to present © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 78
    • 79. Types of research deliverables Reports © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 79
    • 80. Types of research deliverables Reports Advantages • Provide the most detail • Stand alone • Serve as an archive • Allow your presentation to be more high-level • Appear substantial © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 80
    • 81. Types of research deliverables Reports Advantages • Most flexible format – a container for anything: - Text - Images - Annotated screens - Quotes - Personas - Diagrams - Visualizations - Links to video or audio clips © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 81
    • 82. Types of research deliverables Reports Disadvantages • Can be too long • Take longer to create • People often don’t read them • Also have to create a presentation © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 82
    • 83. Types of research deliverables Presentations (two types) • Presentation in addition to a report • Presentation as the only deliverable © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 83
    • 84. Types of research deliverables Presentation in addition to a report © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 84
    • 85. Types of research deliverables Presentation in addition to a report Advantages • Can keep it high-level • Don’t have to cover everything • Can optimize for presenting – less text, more visual © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 85
    • 86. Types of research deliverables Presentation in addition to a report Disadvantages • Need to create two deliverables • Those who attend the presentation may not read the report © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 86
    • 87. Types of research deliverables Presentation as the only deliverable © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 87
    • 88. Types of research deliverables Presentation as the only deliverable Advantages • Takes less time • Costs less • More people attend a presentation than read a report © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 88
    • 89. Types of research deliverables Presentation as the only deliverable Disadvantages • Has to cram in everything or leave out details • Has to be detailed enough to stand alone • Is not the best format to convey detail © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 89
    • 90. Types of research deliverables Presentation as the only deliverable You either end up with: • A text-heavy presentation • Or you have to leave out information © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 90
    • 91. Types of research deliverables Presentation as the only deliverable So how do you solve this dilemma? • Don’t create a presentation as the only deliverable © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 91
    • 92. Types of research deliverables Presentation as the only deliverable So how do you solve this dilemma? • Put the detail in an appendix © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 92
    • 93. Types of research deliverables Presentation as the only deliverable So how do you solve this dilemma? • Create a presentation version AND a detailed, standalone version © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 93
    • 94. Types of research deliverables Presentation as the only deliverable So how do you solve this dilemma? • Record your presentation (screen and audio) so others can view it later © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 94
    • 95. Types of research deliverables Presentation as the only deliverable So how do you solve this dilemma? • Provide annotated designs instead of a presentation © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 95
    • 96. Types of research deliverables Presentation as the only deliverable So how do you solve this dilemma? • Create a high-level presentation and a findings and recommendations matrix to contain the details… © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 96
    • 97. Types of research deliverables Findings and recommendations matrix © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 97
    • 98. Types of research deliverables Findings and recommendations matrix Advantages • Provides an easy way to see the recommendations • Contains the detail, allowing the presentation to remain high-level • Can take the place of a report © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 98
    • 99. Types of research deliverables Findings and recommendations matrix Disadvantages • Another deliverable to create, which takes additional time © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 99
    • 100. Types of research deliverables Other types of research deliverables • Personas • Scenarios • Workflow diagrams • Task analysis diagrams • Customer journey maps • And more… © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 100
    • 101. Types of research deliverables Other types of research deliverables Advantages • Often communicate better than words alone • Easier, quicker, and more interesting to read than a report • People refer back to them more often than re-reading a report © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 101
    • 102. Types of research deliverables Other types of research deliverables Disadvantages • Additional deliverables to create, which takes additional time • Don’t stand alone – additional deliverables are necessary © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 102
    • 103. Types of research deliverables Your experience • Which types of deliverables have you found most or least useful? • Other types of deliverables? © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 103
    • 104. Creating effective research deliverables. © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 104
    • 105. Creating effective research deliverables For an effective research deliverable • Use a good template. • Make it look good. • Explain the methods. • Note the positive aspects. • Visualize findings: using photos, quotes, audio and video clips. • Visualize recommendations. • Prioritize the findings and recommendations. • Guide the audience on the next steps. • Get it reviewed. • Ensure that the right people attend. © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 105
    • 106. Creating effective research deliverables Use a good template. © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 106
    • 107. What a research deliverable needs to do Make it look good, so that people will read it and pay attention. © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 107
    • 108. What a research deliverable needs to do Make it look good, so that people will read it and pay attention. © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 108
    • 109. Creating effective research deliverables Explain the methods you used. © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 109
    • 110. Creating effective research deliverables Note the positive aspects. © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 110
    • 111. Creating effective research deliverables Visualize the findings. © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 111
    • 112. Creating effective research deliverables Visualize the findings. © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 112
    • 113. Creating effective research deliverables Visualize the findings. © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 113
    • 114. Creating effective research deliverables Visualize the findings. © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 114
    • 115. Creating effective research deliverables Use photos to help explain your methods. © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 115
    • 116. Creating effective research deliverables Use photos to help explain your methods. © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 116
    • 117. Creating effective research deliverables Use photos to show what you found in the research. © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 117
    • 118. Creating effective research deliverables Use quotes. © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 118
    • 119. Creating effective research deliverables Use quotes, but don’t overdo it. © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 119
    • 120. Creating effective research deliverables Use quotes – longer, multiple quotes work better in reports. © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 120
    • 121. Creating effective research deliverables Use quotes sparingly in presentations. © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 121
    • 122. Creating effective research deliverables Use quotes sparingly in presentations. © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 122
    • 123. Creating effective research deliverables Use quotes sparingly in presentations, or create two versions. © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 123
    • 124. Creating effective research deliverables Show video clips and audio clips. © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 124
    • 125. Creating effective research deliverables Visualize the recommendations. © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 125
    • 126. Creating effective research deliverables Visualize recommendations with mockups. © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 126
    • 127. Creating effective research deliverables Visualize recommendations by showing examples. © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 127
    • 128. Creating effective research deliverables Visualize recommendations by showing examples. © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 128
    • 129. Creating effective research deliverables Prioritize the findings and recommendations. © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 129
    • 130. Creating effective research deliverables Guide the audience on the next steps. © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 130
    • 131. Creating effective research deliverables Guide the audience on the next steps. © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 131
    • 132. Creating effective research deliverables Get it reviewed. © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 132
    • 133. Creating effective research deliverables Get it reviewed. © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 133
    • 134. Creating effective research deliverables Source: Flickr – Charles Roffey Ensure that the right people attend the presentation. © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 134
    • 135. Beyond deliverables. © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 135
    • 136. Beyond deliverables Source: Flickr – Intangible Arts Is “delivery” the best way to impart research findings? © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 136
    • 137. Beyond deliverables Problems with delivery • Research is less impactful without experiencing it firsthand. • People only take in and remember some of the information. • Deliverables aren’t an effective substitute for you after you’re gone. © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 137
    • 138. Beyond deliverables The solution: collaborative research • Involve the clients and project team in - Planning - Observing - Analysis © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 138
    • 139. Beyond deliverables Involve the clients and project team in planning. © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 139
    • 140. Beyond deliverables Source: Flickr – Rosenfeld Media 2009 Involve the clients and project team in observing the research. © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 140
    • 141. Beyond deliverables Source: Flickr – Jason DeRuna Source: Flickr – Rosenfeld Media 2009 Involve the clients and project team in analyzing the results. © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 141
    • 142. Beyond deliverables Collaborative research gives the team: • More empathy for the users • A deeper understanding of the problems and recommended solutions • A stronger sense of responsibility to solve the problems © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 142
    • 143. Beyond deliverables But still provide a deliverable to document the research. © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 143
    • 144. Beyond deliverables Remain involved after presenting the deliverable: • To answer questions and provide guidance • To collaborate on the design • To conduct further research © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 144
    • 145. Conclusion. © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 145
    • 146. Conclusion To effectively communicate user research: • Set the right expectations. • Communicate throughout the research process. • Conduct collaborative research. • Create a deliverable. • Remain involved. © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 146
    • 147. Thank You. Jim Ross @anotheruxguy www.anotheruxguy.com jross@electronicink.com © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 147
    • 148. Questions and Discussion. © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 148
    • 149. Thank You. Jim Ross @anotheruxguy www.anotheruxguy.com jross@electronicink.com © 2012. ELECTRONIC INK, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Effectively Communicating User Research Findings 7/10/2013 149

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