F11 75-nish team 75 final proposal

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F11 75-nish team 75 final proposal

  1. 1. SEC Cardboard Bumper Assembly Jig for the NISH AbilityOne Design Challenge Client:Specialized Training for Adult Rehabilitation Semester: Fall 2011 Ref: SEC F11-75-NISH Team Members: Ben Blair, ME John Hughey, CpE Jordan John, ME (PM) Linden Eason, EE Prepared by: Saluki Engineering TeamP75 g e 1| a SEC
  2. 2. 8 November 2011Specialized Training for Adult RehabilitationAttn: Kathy Baumann, Executive DirectorP.O. BOX 93820 North 13th StreetMurphysboro, Illinois 62966Dear Mrs. Baumann,The letter is in response to your request for proposal for the NISH AbilityOne Design NetworkChallenge. Our team, SEC Team 75, has developed a cardboard banding jig designed forproduction and completion of cardboard bumper systems through START and its subsidiaries.Further, we believe that our design will not only increase production numbers dramatically, butwill help to aid and assist the operator of said jig.This proposal is based on simple, clean, and efficient incorporation of electronic and mechanicalsystems. The goal of this design is to be able to create cardboard bumpers rapidly and easilythrough the use of racking, clamping, and counting assemblies. Overall, START is producingapproximately 1200 units per week while their demand from their current subsidiary is 4000(Please see Appendix A). We hope to exceed this projected number through our jig.Finally, SEC Team 75 would like to thank you for the opportunity to submit a design proposal toyour company and we hope to hear from you soon.Sincerely,Jordan JohnProject Manager – Team 75Saluki Engineering Companyjjohn89@siu.edu(618) 303-0975 2|Page
  3. 3. Executive Summary The Saluki Engineering Company in collaboration with the Institute for EconomicEmpowerment has put out a request for proposal that states, “Client wants a device or asystem that will solve a real workplace problem for at least one group of severelyhandicapped workers.” The goal is to design a cardboard bumper assembly jig. Thedesign will be simple, efficient, and cost effective. The approach to this request is amultifaceted design that will increase ease of assembly as well as increase productionrates by a projected 233.33%. The project will consist of an electrical and mechanical subassembly workingtogether to create an overall project. The assembly will consist of the following: The mechanical system will be a racking and clamping system. The rack will be aplate that will be supported by rigid rectangular shafts. As the cardboard pieces are fedinto the rack, the electrical system will allow for the user to know if the system is underfilled, filled, or overfilled through the use of LED indicators. These indicators will behoused and attached to the racking system and controlled by a microcontroller. Once therack is filled, the clamping system will swing downward and hold the pieces togetherallowing the operator to band the cardboard slivers. The final design of said project will conclude in early April with a detailed designreport submitted by April 19th, 2012. The estimated cost of the final design will be $248. 3|Page
  4. 4. Non-Disclosure Information The information provided in or for this proposal is the confidential, proprietary propertyof the Saluki Engineering Company of Carbondale, Illinois, USA. Such information may be usedsolely by the party to whom the proposal has been submitted by the Saluki EngineeringCompany and solely for the purpose of evaluating this proposal. The submittal of this proposalconfers no right in, or license to use, or right to disclose to others for any purpose, the subjectmatter, or such information or data, nor confers the right to reproduce or offer such informationfor sale. All drawings, specifications, and other writings supplied with this proposal are to bereturned to Saluki Engineering Company promptly upon request. The use of this information,other than for the purpose of evaluating this proposal, is subject to the terms of agreement underwhich services are to be performed pursuant to this proposal. 4|Page
  5. 5. Table of ContentsTransmittal Letter (JJ)……………………………………………………………………………..2 Executive Summary (LE)..………..………………………………………………………………3 Nondisclosure Statement……………………………………………………...…………………..4Table of Contents………………………………………………………………………………….5List of Tables and Figures…………………………………………………………………………6Introduction (JH)...……….………………………....………………………………………..……7 Literature Review (All, Revised by BB)………….……....………………………..………..……8Project Description (JJ).……………………………………………………………………….…18Project Specifications (JJ).…...……………………………………………………………..……20Design Basis (JJ)…....……………………………………………………………………………20Project Organization (JJ).…...……………………………………………..………………..……21Scope of Work (JJ)……………………………………………………………………………….21Subsystem Design………………………………………………………………………………..22 Clamping System (BB)……………….…………………………………………………….22 Racking System (JJ)…………………....…………………..………………………………23 Power Source (LE)…………………...…………………………………………………….26 Control Circuit (JH)……………..…….…………………………………………………....27 Microcontroller (JH)……..…………...…………………………………………………….28 Sensors (JH)………………………….……………………………………………………..30 LEDs (LE)…………………………….……………………………………………………32 Ventilation and Filters (LE)…………….…………………………………………………..33 Training Aids (JH, LE)………………….………………………………………………….34Material Selection (BB)…....………………………………………………………………….…34 Action Item List (All)……...………………………………………………………………….…35Draft Schedule (JJ)…..…………………………………………………………………………...36Resources Needed (JJ, JH)…………………………………………………………………….…37List of Analysis (All)…………………………………………………………………………….37Works Cited……………………………………………………………………………………...39 Appendix A: Communications……..……………………………………………………………41Appendix B: RFP Documents…………………………………………………………………....42Appendix C: 3-D Renderings of Mechanical System (JJ)…………………………….…………50Appendix D: Microcontroller Wiring Diagram…...…………………………………..…………53Appendix E: Resumes……………………………………………………………………………54 5|Page
  6. 6. List of Tables and FiguresFiguresFigure 1: Cardboard Bumper Picture…………………………………………………………….11Figure 2: Jig Design………………..…………………………………………………………….13Figure 3: Cost of Binding Machine..…………………………………………………………….14Figure 4: Banding Machine…….………………………………………………………………..15Figure 5: Shirt Press……....…….………………………………………………………………..17Figure 6: Block Diagram………………..…………….…………………………………………19Figure 7: Supports………………………………………………………………………………..24Figure 8: Racking Plate………………………………………………………………………..…25Figure 9: Draft Assembly……………………………………………………………………...…26Figure 10: Circuit Logic Diagram………………………………………………………………..27Figure 11: Pin Assignment Diagram…………………………………………………………..…28Figure 12: Microcontroller Wiring Diagram……………………………..…………..………….30Figure 13: Sensor Placement Diagram………………………………………………..…………31Figure 14: Sample LED……………………………………………………………….…………32Figure 15: LED Setup…………………………………………………………………..………..33TablesTable 1: Production Rates………………………………………………………………………....8Table 2: Project Specifications………………..…………………………………………………20Table 3: Basis of Design…………………………………………………………………………20Table 4: Organizational Chart………………………….………………………………………...21Table 5: Material Selection Matrix………………………………………………………………34Table 6: Action Item List……………………………….………………………………………..35Table 7: Proposed Schedule…………………………….………………………………………..36Table 8: Resources Needed………………………………………………………………………37 6|Page
  7. 7. Introduction In the early 1960’s a movement began; A movement that would finally allow those withsevere handicaps, mental and physical alike, to no longer feel ostracized in the workplace. Thismovement, known as the Disability Rights Movement, would lead to numerous nationalorganizations aimed to aid those with handicaps to find work and succeed in industry. One of theorganizations formed during these trying times was the National Institute for the SeverelyHandicapped (NISH). Through the years, NISH has developed into an international organization helpinghundreds of thousands people find work despite their handicaps. One of the biggest challengesNISH has encountered is being able to place clients in to work that has numerous restrictions.These restrictions are often based on ergonomics and movement controlled assembly. Because ofthis, NISH has developed the AbilityOne Network Challenge. The NISH AbilityOne Network Challenge sponsors competition throughout the nationaimed at the design and manufacturing of “enabling devices”. These devices seek to aid thosewith handicaps to perform complex tasks easily. In other words, these devices create a solutionto problems affecting those with handicaps in the workplace. Specialized Training for Adult Rehabilitation (START), a NPO based out ofMurphysboro, Illinois that is a subsidiary of NISH. START has in house facilities in which theyemploy individuals with handicaps. One of their current projects is creating cardboard bumpersthat are used by local companies for shipping and packing. Currently, they are able to produce1200 units per week. Their current client has increased their demand to 4000 units per week. 7|Page
  8. 8. Through the development of an assistive jig, SEC Team 75 hopes to expedite their currentassembly process to meet this demand. Current Production Requested Production Increase Needed 1200 units 4000 units 2800 units (233.33%) Table 1: Production Rates As table 1 shows, the increase needed to reach the goals set by START’s client is around2800 units, or 233.33%. The concept of this design includes a jig in which they will be able torack, clamp, and count cardboard pieces allowing faster wrapping and assembly of cardboardbumpers.Literature Review The American Heritage Stedman’s Medical Dictionary defines handicap as a physical,mental, or emotional condition that interferes with ones normal functioning [1]. When mostpeople think of the word handicap, they instantly envision someone in a wheelchair; however,there are other disabilities such as being hearing impaired, having a long term illness, a braininjury, or even intellectual disabilities just to name a few. The 2010 census reports that in the United States as a whole, around twelve percent ofthe population, nearly thirty-six million people have some level of disability. Individuals whosuffer from disabilities have reported difficulties in obtaining jobs, keeping a job once obtained,and performing job duties. The average employment rate of disabled citizens across the UnitedStates is a paltry 33.4 percent [2]. NISH, the National Institute for the Severely Handicapped, is an organization that isfocused on helping people with disabilities gain employment. NISH’s mission is “Create 8|Page
  9. 9. employment opportunities for people with significant disabilities.” [3] NISH been helpinghandicapped people since 1974. NISH is affiliated with the AbilityOne program. The AbilityOneprogram is composed of 600 nonprofit organizations across the United States. One of theseorganizations is START in Murphysboro. These organizations are dedicated to providing workto disabled people and providing them income. They work toward finding jobs for people withall types of disabilities, from the blind to those with mental disabilities like autism. TheAbilityOne network currently employees around 47,000 people, making them the largestemployer of disabled people in the United States. [3] Every year NISH supports a competition called the AbilityOne Design Challenge. In thiscompetition students are encourage to make something that can assist people with disabilities intheir everyday careers. These designs are required to help make their daily task easier. The teamsmust registered by the 20th of April. In their entry each group must submit a final report with fulldetails of their design, as well as a video of their design in use. These designs are put though strict judging criteria. These criteria are based on a series ofquestions. “• Is the assistive technology device/system a solution to a barrier that prevents a person with a significant disability from entering or advancing in the workplace? If the answer is “No”, the submission will not be reviewed further and will be considered to be out of contention. • Was a prototype built? If the answer is “No”, the submission will not 9|Page
  10. 10. be reviewed further and will be considered to be out of contention. • Was the device/system designed in collaboration with a person who has a disability? If the answer is “No”, the submission will not be reviewed further and will be considered to be out of contention. • Is the device/system currently being used or intended for use? by the end of the current school year? Additional consideration is given to those devices that are in use. • Was the design developed with consultation from a NISH affiliated NPA? Additional consideration is given to those that worked with a NISH affiliate.” [5] The final results depend on how well each group answers the questions above, as well asa few additional things such as safety and overall ease of use. The better the design solves aproblem but at the same time meets these judging criteria the more highly rated the entry willplace in the competition. Workforce Concerns The closest organization in the AbilityOne network is Specialized Training for AdultRehabilitation Inc., also known as S.T.A.R.T. This not-for profit organization has been aroundsince 1969. The S.T.A.R.T. program caters to disabled adults by offering six differentrehabilitation programs that serve over one hundred and fifty, not limited to just workingopportunities. The organization had very humble beginnings, when it was first founded it 10 | P a g e
  11. 11. operated out of a church basement. Now the program utilizes over thirty-six thousand square feetof space for its programs [6]. “Work opportunities include mobile custodial crews,subcontracting services for area businesses, janitorial services at the rest area on Interstate 57,and state of the art microfilming and digital scanning services.” [6] Current System and Proposed Design The S.T.A.R.T. factory in Murphysboro currently uses a binding system that workers useto double-bind stacks of cardboard strips. This system relies heavily on the use of human labor,because the current system calls for the stack to be manually counted, stack, held, and bound.These stacks of cardboard strips are used as packing bumpers by Penn Aluminum. PennAluminum uses the bumpers to pack and protect the products they send out on a daily basis.Penn has been a long-time contractor with S.T.A.R.T., starting nearly fifteen years ago, andS.T.A.R.T has been producing these bumpers for them nearly the same amount of time. Figure 1: Cardboard bumper 11 | P a g e
  12. 12. Recently, Penn has led S.T.A.R.T.to increase the production of bumpers per month to doublewhat their current production rate is at making the current quota nearly 4000 bumpers a month.While S.T.A.R.T. has been able to slightly increase their production of the bumpers, they are notable to fully meet the demand at this point. With a slight amount of simple adjustments theproductivity will be able to be increased to meet demands set forth by the client. To make the bumpers, employees currently hand count out 15 pieces of cardboard of a setlength and width. Then they hold the cardboard pieces together and wrap them in tape on bothends, producing the cardboard bumpers. One problem is that it takes a lot of motor skills to holdall 15 pieces together while wrapping the bumper with tape that is dispensed from a wet tapemachine. This causes production to be slow because many of the disabled people that work atSTART have disabilities that limit their motor skills. When our team visited the factory duringproduction hours they noticed that even though S.T.A.R.T. has two tape dispensers, they areunable to use them because there is only one worker per shift with the necessary motor skills tohold the cardboard bundle while simultaneously cranking out a length of tape and then wrappingthe tape around the cardboard. 12 | P a g e
  13. 13. Figure 2: Jig Design As seen in Figure 2 above one idea on how to assist the operator is to include a jig deviceto hold the cardboard stacks in place as the operator binds the stack. Another idea is to build asystem that allows the pieces to be held, much like the clamping system above, but also to rotateto ease the process of wrapping the band around the unit. While a system that uses mechanical components to lessen the amount of dexterityrequired to perform the task is great, a completely autonomous system is not what we are strivingfor. The whole reason S.T.A.R.T. exists is to help people with disabilities find work. Rather thancreating an expensive machine to do the task for them, we are striving to make an efficient, 13 | P a g e
  14. 14. affordable, and easy to use mechanism to assist the process. The plan is to incorporateelectronics into the design via sensors and possible electro mechanics, but due to the nature ofS.T.A.R.T the design must not be a financial burden on them, therefore target unit cost isbetween two and five hundred dollars. Most automatic banding units cost over one thousanddollars, with high-end units selling for nearly ten thousand dollars.Model CostPac SM65 Arch Strapping Machine $9986Signode TABLE-TYER Plastic Strapping Machine $2566Signode 430999 Power Strapping Machine $1082 Figure 3: Cost of Binding Machines The current tape dispenser system looks much like the machine in figure 4 below.S.T.A.R.T. had considered helping to make the job easier by buying automatic tape dispensers,but even those units were much too expensive. By utilize the existing units in the design, sincethey have proven reliable and the employees are used to using them, the total cost of the designmay to be reduced. 14 | P a g e
  15. 15. Figure 4: Banding Machine [7] The way the strips are stacked is a major point that could be improved. Bydecreasing the time required to count out the strips and then arrange them in a neat row couldsignificantly increase daily output of the cardboard bumpers. The amount of time that is takes tomake count the bumpers and stack them is close to 2 minutes. To make the job of counting the strips easier, the idea to using sensors to detect when thecorrect number of cardboard strips have been placed into the machine. The most cost-effectiveoption seems to be using an infra-red sensor and connecting it to a microcontroller inside theunit. Infra-red sensors are widely used in robotics and are fairly cheap and easy to maintain mostcosting roughly $25-$100 [8]. 15 | P a g e
  16. 16. There are a couple different ways to program the sensor. The first way, and probably theeasiest is to program the sensor to count each strip as it is loaded into the holding tray. When thesensor has counted the correct number of cardboard strips, a green LED will light up on the unitand the employee will know that it is time to activate the holding system and wrap the tapearound the bundle. The second way to program the sensor would be to make it so that the green LED lightsup after the cardboard reaches a certain height. The microcontroller for the unit will also be fairlyinexpensive and will probably be the best option to handle the input from the sensor A third way is measure the weight of the stack and allowing the sensor to engage betweena certain tolerances, which would again activate a green stating the jig is full. Included in all ofthese would be a red light that allows the user to know when the jig is overfilled. After looking at various competing systems, both in terms of binding and in terms of tapedispensing, none of the other products seem to be near to what is needed by S.T.A.R.T., and if aproduct is similar to a possible desired component design it is out of the price range that anorganization like S.T.A.R.T. could afford. The option of a stacking system could also speed up the bumper production process. Apatent for a device that is used to stack fanfold paper was fold and reviewed. Creating a systemsimilar to this device will be of benefit to S.T.A.R.T. This design is a very good design becauseof its simplicity. It uses very few moving parts and is fairly inexpensive [9]. The design allowssheets to slide down a chute that only allows the sheets to fall flat on the bottom of a tank thatholds all of the paper. A problem may arise in the case when the cardboard trying to be stackedmay not fall flat. This is a very small flaw though, since employees could easily reach in and fix 16 | P a g e
  17. 17. the problem. The design allows stacks to be made easily, by a simple process. This is ideal forthe design that can be used by the S.T.A.R.T. facility because the simplicity means it can beeasily used and taught to the employees. The problem with the design mentioned above is that a hopper system would need to beincluded to render the stacking system improvement. Due to the size of the cardboard strips,11x2x.25 inches, a hopper that would hold a considerable amount of cardboard strips that wouldallow steady production would have to be of substantial size. This depending on S.T.A.R.T.’swork space may cause a problem by consuming to large of area making it impractical inS.T.A.R.T’s limited workspace for this project which is 15x8. The Last component the design could include is a clamping device. Since one of thelargest problems in production is the holding of the cardboard in place, a clamp may be put inplace to hold the stack steady in a jig while being bound. The clamp would resemble somethingthat is used in presses, with a handle the must be pulled down to lock in place until released. Ashirt press like seen in figure 5 below contains a sample clamp that would apply pressure on thestack in the jig. Figure 5: Shirt Press [10] 17 | P a g e
  18. 18. The biggest considerations for the design are as follows. First, is ease of use? Since thecompetition is focus on simplicity, but more importantly the S.T. A.R.T. facility is focusedtoward providing jobs that mental disabled employees can accomplish. So the easier the designcan be taught and used the more useful the final product will be. The second thing is the cost ofthe design. Since S.T.A.R.T. has limited funding the cost of the system must not place them in afinical burden. Ultimately these constraints will determine which of the above options for designwill be able to be included in an effective manner.Project Description Team 75’s objective is to create a device that will assist the racking, holding, and bandingof cardboard bumpers. The basis of this design is to create a base racking system. As the operatorfills this racking system, three LED indicators will give insight on how full the jig is. The LED’swill light up as the sensors indicate capacity either by means of a microcontroller or logic circuit.The first LED will allow the user to know the jig is not filled full, but is actively powered. Thesecond will tell the operator the jig is at proper capacity (15 cardboard slivers). The last will tellthe operator the jig is over capacity. Once the jig is properly filled, a swing clamp will comedown and apply pressure to the bunch. Once this is done, the operator can then band the bumperand production is complete. By speeding the counting process and assisting with holding whilebanding, the operator will be able to speed production time and will also see an ease in doing so.The organization of this jig is seen in figure 6. 18 | P a g e
  19. 19. Overflow LED Fill LED Underflow LED Arduino Uno AC to DC Power Electrical System Microcontroller Supply or Logic Circuit Fill Sensor Overflow Sensor Carboard Banding System Ventilation and Filters Mechanical Racking Clamping Feed (Counting) Taping System Mechanism Mechanism Figure 6: Block Diagram Currently, the process is done completely by hand. Therefore, any implementation ofassistance will increase production. The current production rate is around 1200 units per week.This figure is gathered during final shipment each week to the company they create the bumpersfor. The design team for this project has also confirmed these numbers by video tapingproduction and scaling the timing over the weekly hours. Overall, we are hoping to increaseproduction from 1200 units to 4000+ allowing not only the client’s demands to be met, but anincrease in salary for the operators. Currently, they are paid on a by-piece basis, so, if we are ableto speed units produced, we will also be able to help the operator make more during a shift. Ourfinal production rates will be calculated in the same manner, by averaging a piece-by-pieceproduction time through video taping and scaling this over the weekly hours. 19 | P a g e
  20. 20. Project Specifications Project Specifications Size 2x2x2 Weight <20lbs Cost <250 Productivity Rate 60 bumpers per hour Operating Force 10lbf (projected) Microcontroller Voltage Requirement ~8V Table 2: Project SpecificationsDesign Basis Documents Date Request for Proposal 9-Sep-11 SEC RFP Project Definition 9-Sep-11 SEC RFP List of Deliverables 9-Sep-11 Draft Proposal 8-Nov-11 Final Proposal* 8-Dec-11 End of Proposal Memo 8-Dec-11 Progress Report 23-Feb-12 Design Report 19-Apr-12 Notebooks and End of Project Memo 5-May-12 Table 3: Basis of Design (Please see appendix B for home documents) *Final Proposal overrules any statements made in the draft proposal 20 | P a g e
  21. 21. Project Organization Project Manager: Jordan John (ME) Responsibilities: 3-D Rendering/Material Selection/Racking System Linden Eason (EE) John Hughey (CpE) Ben Blair Responsibilities: Responsibilities: Responsibilities: Electrical Wiring and Programming/Software Material Selection/Clamping Integration/Harness Wiring Mapping and Integration System/Fabrication and Integration Table 4: Organizational ChartScope of Work List of Deliverables as Required Literature Review Technical description of all work done for every solution Equipment, component, and materials take-off lists and costs for each solution Technical Drawings Selected solution with Pugh chart Technical description of recommended system and how it works Summary of lab tests and analysis performed relevant to solution Complete specification including all drawings necessary for production and installation as well as repair Complete list of components and signal processes Table of performance data Technical list of problems and limitations derived during design and testing Analysis of electromagnetic compatibility including coding Fault analysis Technical Manual 21 | P a g e
  22. 22. Users Guide Conclusion and recommendation section Estimated cost of production Timeline to construct, build, or manufacture AppendixSubsystem DesignsClamping SystemSummary of Components Clamping device Lever Pressure applying plate Jig Mounting UnitList of Deliverables Clamping Prototype Analysis of maximum force needed on handle Analysis of mechanical advantage Analysis of minimum pressure needed for plate clamping 3-D Renderings Due to the current problem that S.T.A.R.T. has with holding the bumper stacks whiletaping them together, the use of a clamp will be included in the design. The clamp’s purpose is toapply pressure to the stack so that it the stack will be firmly held in place in the jig. The clamp does not need to apply a lot of force, only enough to keep the stack solidseated in the jig. The clamp will resemble that of a shirt press machine. It will have a handle thatextends forward that the employee will be able to pull down with minimal force to apply thepressure of the clamp. The clamp will be composed of a four bar mechanism which when theforce of the lever is applied the four bar mechanism will move until weigh is over center causingthe mechanism to lock in place. To release the mechanism the level will need to be lifted to 22 | P a g e
  23. 23. allow the center of mass to return to its original position. The length of the handle will bedetermined to allow the greatest mechanical advantage so it can be used by all employee’s atSTART.Racking SystemSummary of Components RackJig Supports Racking Plate Assembly Sensor HousingList of Deliverables Racking Prototype Analysis of proper sensor placement Analysis of maximum force applied on supports Analysis of tolerance through system Analysis of clamping attachment placement 3-D Renderings The basis of the rack design will be a support set with a plate assembly mounted on theinside of the supports. Along the back support, the clamping device will be mounted. First, for anease of visualization, please refer to appendix C. Appendix C has drawings that show theproposed design on a drafted model. These drawings were made by using AutoDesk Inventor2010. The supports of the racking system will be made from steel rectangular tubes. The leftand right will be identical with drilled holes through the body of each to mount the plateassembly. The back tube will be longer to allow the clamping device to be attached. As 23 | P a g e
  24. 24. proposed, the left, right, and back tubes will be cut to 12”, 12”, and 14” respectively. Again, thisis just a drafted model and said measurements can change. Figure 7: Supports Next, the rack assembly will be mounted within the thresholds of the supports. This iswhere the operator will put the cardboard slivers into the rack allowing the operator to workhands free during this process. The plate will be cut to 11.5” W by 2” deep. The height of therack will be anywhere from 4.5” to 6.5” depending on the final design. 24 | P a g e
  25. 25. Figure 8: Racking Plate The rack will also be home to the clamping assembly. As seen in the appendices, aproposed clamping assembly will attach to the rear support shaft and swing downwards into therack allowing pressure to be applied to the stack of cardboard slivers. This design will have to beprototyped once force analysis is done on the clamping system. Finally, the sensor placement has yet to be determined. Because of the nature of sensorsand how they react to different reflections of materials, direct sensor placement will derive fromadequate testing and analysis allowing for the precise placement. This analysis will be mostlybased on where exactly the sensor will be most accurate. By finding a position along the frame inwhich the sensor can function normally and without interference, we will be able to make theoverall system more accurate. Interference can be a result from many things (magnetic fields, 25 | P a g e
  26. 26. reflective properties of the metals used, “noise”, etc.) so the placement will be determined duringour analysis and testing phases. All subassemblies of the rack system will be attached with fasteners of 1/4” diameter andvarying lengths. Some will be direct carriage style bolts; some will be counter bored screwsallowing for flush design. The assembly will appear similar to the following: Figure 9: Draft AssemblyPower SourceSummary of Components Power SourceList of Deliverables Functioning power source 26 | P a g e
  27. 27. Analysis of output power The most important item to complete the electrical sub-system is the power source. Themicrocontroller can be operated within a voltage range of six volts to twenty volts but operatesoptimally between seven volts and twelve volts and uses a wall power adapter. The wall poweradapter chosen to power the selected microcontroller has an output of nine volts.Control CircuitSummary of Components 2 to 4 demultiplexer Breadboard Power SupplyList of Deliverables Working prototype Stress tests for components The individual inputs from the sensors will need to be processed in order for the correctLED to light up. While we had originally planned to use an Arduino for this purpose, a physicalcircuit will be cheaper to build and maintain. The physical circuit should also be more durable.The circuit will follow a simple logic pattern (see appendix D). Figure 10: Circuit Logic Diagram 27 | P a g e
  28. 28. As the above figure shows, the circuit will have four states. State 00 (neither sensordetects cardboard) will light up the green LED to tell the operator to fill the jig. State 01 (overfillsensor off, fill sensor on) will light up the yellow LED to tell the operator that the jig is full. State11 (overfill sensor on, fill sensor on) will light up the red LED to let the operator know the jig istoo full. State 10 (overfill sensor on, fill sensor off) will be used as a simple form of errordetection and will light up all three LEDs as red. Since we have 2 inputs and 4 outputs it isnecessary to use a 2-to-4 demultiplexer to handle the logic. A demultiplexer uses several ANDgates to take a small number of inputs and translate them into a greater number of outputs. Thepin assignment diagram for the demultiplexer is as follows (Also in appendix D): Figure 11: Pin Assignment DiagramMicrocontrollerSummary of Components Microcontroller 28 | P a g e
  29. 29. List of Deliverables Working prototype Documented C code structure The individual inputs from the sensors will need to be processed in order for the correctLED to light up. While this could be done using a physical circuit, the amount of datatransmitted by the sensors that would then need to be transmitted to the LEDs makes using aphysical circuit a poor option. Since power is required to operate the sensors and LEDs, it is asmall step to incorporate a microcontroller into the design. The microcontroller that fits ourdesign the based is part of the Arduino series of microcontrollers. These microcontrollers arebased on an open source platform that allows for easy development. The wiring diagram for thesensors we plan to use is as follows (Also in appendix D): 29 | P a g e
  30. 30. Figure 12: Microcontroller Wiring Diagram [11] To connect the LEDs to the microcontroller, it will be necessary to use a 330 Ohmresistor in series with each LED to prevent them from burning out. The microcontroller will needto be programmed to handle the sensor inputs and convert them into the proper outputs for theLED indicators. Arduino microcontrollers can be programmed in C, which is fortunately one ofthe most wide-spread programming languages. The C language is very versatile, which isfortunate since it allows the programmer to develop custom functions through which to runinputs and outputs. This allows the code for the microcontroller to be minimal.SensorsSummary of Components IR PhotosensorsList of Deliverables Report of sensor placement on the jig Report of sensor placement angles Functional prototype Analysis of sensor accuracy 30 | P a g e
  31. 31. Figure 13: Sensor Placement Diagram Based on the project design, two sensors are needed. The term “sensor(s)” as used in thissubsection refers to both parts of the sensor unit, the emitter and the receiver. The first sensorwill be placed 4.25 inches above the base of the jig. This sensor will return a “low” value when itdetects under-fill and return a “high” value when the jig is full, indicating the correct number ofcardboard strips have been inserted. The second sensor will be placed .25 inches above theunder-fill sensor, and will be utilized to prevent over-fill of the jig, returning a “high” valuewhen the jig is not over-filled and a “low” value when the jig is over-filled. The over-fillindicator is necessary in the event that an employee loads too many strips into the jig, going overthe specified amount of cardboard strips. This can easily happen due to the need for an increasedproduction rate of nearly four hundred percent as requested by the contract holder for thecardboard bumper project(see appendix A). The biggest concern when selecting which sensor toutilize is the range which the sensor produces accurate measurements. Another concern whenselecting the sensor is the level of background noise produced by ambient light. In order toproduce a final product that maximizes cost effectiveness and fits within size specifications,photo sensors that work off the infrared spectrum of light will be implemented. The sensor works 31 | P a g e
  32. 32. based on an LED that sends infrared light into the jig that will then be reflected into the photosensor when the cardboard strips reach the required height.Indicator LEDsSummary of Components: Green LED (power on) Yellow LED (capacity) RedLED (over capacity)List of Deliverables: Analysis of viewing placement of LEDs Analysis of LED placement on rack Analysis LEDs colors and brightness Functioning indicator system Figure 14: Sample LED [12] Once the photo sensors are inserted in the proper place, the use of red-green-blue lightemitting diodes (RGB LEDs) will be used to indicate the states of the cardboard strips placed inthe jig. A system of three LEDs will be used to specify if the jig has enough cardboard strips tocontinue with the binding process. The first of the three LEDs will light up green and stay litmost of the time to inform the employee operating the jig to keep inserting material. The secondLED will light up yellow once the jig is filled to correct height, which in this design is measureat 4.25 inches. The third and final LED will light up red as fail safe to notify the operator that the 32 | P a g e
  33. 33. machine is over-filled, which will be measured at 4.5 inches and strips must be removed until thesecond LED displays yellow. Although one RGB LED is able to produce multiple colors, thedecision to go with three separate diodes was to take into account any employees that may haveproblems distinguishing color. Therefore, the LEDs will be placed in an adjacent verticalposition so that the LEDs can mimic the fill process with the bottom light meaning fill, themiddle light meaning stop and the top light meaning over fill. This is shown below: Figure 15 : LED SetupVentilation and FilterSummary of Components: Fan Exhaust Vents HousingList of Deliverables: Diagram of electrical sub-system placement Analysis of filters efficiency Analysis of airflow and operating temperatures Analysis of exhaust vent placement Functioning cooling and protective layout The other electrical sub-systems will need to be enclosed within a case to protect themfrom any damage due to the working environment. The goal is to make this case rugged andbreathable with a light weight material. The design include two exhaust vents and a fan that will 33 | P a g e
  34. 34. be used to give the parts better air flow and keep internal temperature at or slightly below roomtemperature (approximately 72°F). One of the exhaust vents will be placed facing away from thejig while the other facing the side as intake. A filter will be placed inside of the exhaust vent forintake to prevent any dust entering the case and causing damage to the parts inside. The type offan, filter and even vent placement has not been completely determined until we have completeanalysis of airflow and the operating temperatures produced by the other electrical sub-systems.Training AidsSummary of Components: Training media for employees Training ManualsList of Deliverables: Training media for employees Documentation of all subsystems for START to use if maintenance is needed In order for both current and future employees of the START facility to use the prototype,training materials will need to be designed. The directors of the facility will need to beinterviewed to determine the most effective training materials currently in use at the facility sothat the materials provided for this product are as effective as possible. Possible trainingmediums include training videos, training manuals, and posters with helpful reminders.Regardless of the medium used, the training materials will provide a step-by-step walkthrough ofthe operation of the jig. A manual will also be provided to the directors of the START facility inorder for them to have full documentation of the components used. Included in this manual willbe instructions for basic maintenance.Material Selection 34 | P a g e
  35. 35. Material type Yield Strength Density Cost Overall rating (MPa) (lb/in^3) ($/ton) ASTM A681 (Steel) 380 0.282 1000 8.6 AISI 1020 (Steel) 350 0.284 3000 5.5 Al 2024 (Aluminum) 324 0.1 2100 7.2 Al 5052 (Aluminum) 228 0.097 1000 8.5 Table 5: Material Selection Matrix From this material selection matrix, it can be seen that a steel subsidiary is the best choicefor cost effectiveness in this application.The steel will be a common carbon steel, like ASTMA81 and AISI 1020 as shown in the matrix, that can be bought at a local hardware store.Action Item List # Activity Person Assigned Due Status Comments 1 Order Electrical Parts JH 11/16/11 11/22/11 50% Purchase Mechanical 2 JJ 11/16/11 1/17/12 0% Parts Begin testing and analysis 3 LE 11/16/11 1/24/12 0% of AC Power Begin Racking System 4 JJ 11/16/11 1/24/12 0% Base Build Begin Programming 5 JH 11/16/11 1/24/12 0% Infared Sensors Begin Programming 6 JH 11/16/11 1/24/12 0% Simple Logic Controller Begin Programming 7 JH 11/16/11 1/31/12 0% Arduino Microcontroller Begin Sensor Placement 8 JH/LE 11/16/11 1/31/12 0% Analysis 9 Finalize LED Placement LE 11/16/11 2/7/12 0% Begin Clamping 10 BB 11/16/11 2/7/12 0% Mechanism Design Begin Ventilation and 11 LE 11/16/11 2/7/12 0% Filter Analysis Table 6: Action Item List 35 | P a g e
  36. 36. Project #: F11-75-NISH 17-Jan-12 24-Jan-12 31-Jan-12 7-Feb-12 14-Feb-12 21-Feb-12 28-Feb-12 6-Mar-12 13-Mar-12 20-Mar-12 27-Mar-12 3-Apr-12 10-Apr-12 17-Apr-12 24-Apr-12 1-May-12 Activity Week 1 Week 2 Week 3 Week 4 Week 5 Week 6 Week 7 Week 8 Week 9 Week 10 Week 11 Week 12 Week 13 Week 14 Week 15 Week 16 Design/Assembly Test AC Power Source For Safety Finalize Base Design for Racking System Program Infared Sensors Program Simple Logic Controller Program Arduino Microcontroller Determine Infared Sensor Housing Placement Finalize Indicator LED Placement Finalize Clamping Mechanism Finalize Ventilation and Filter Placement Assembly/Testing Prototype Build/Assembly # Prototype Test 1 Redesign/Rebuild Proposed Spring 2012 Schedule Prototype Test 2 # Intruction Manual and Signage Reports Written Progress Report NISH Ability One Report Drafting Table 7: Proposed Schedule NISH Ability One Report # Mechanical Subsystem Report Drafting Electrical Subsystem Report Drafting SEC Design Report # Poster # Final Presentations # Notebooks Team Evals and Course Assessment End of Project Memo Legend Bid Worked Revised Activity Milestone # ! *36 | P a g e
  37. 37. Resources NeededItem Description Quantity Individual Price Overall Price Subtotal (w/on hand) Subtotal (w/o on hand) 1 AutoDesk Inventor Software 1 $1,500.00 On Hand 2 MEEP Machine Shop Work 5 hours $25.00 On Hand Misc. Costs $0.00 $1,625.00 3 Arduino Uno 1 $30.00 $30.00 4 AC Adapter 1 $7.00 $7.00 5 Optical Phototransistor (QRD1114) 5 $1.13 $5.65 6 T1-3/4 (5mm) Multicolor RGB LED with White Diffused Lens 10 $1.75 $17.50 7 CanaKit 1/4W Resistor Kit 1 $15.00 $15.00 8 Wire (6 colors) 60 foot $0.1-0 per foot $6.00 Electrical Costs $81.15 $81.15 9 Steel Plate (48"x48" 1/4"thickness) 1 $118.86 $118.86 10 Steel Rectangular Shaft (2"x2" 1/4"thickness) 50 $0.54 per inch $27.05 11 Pins for Clamp (1/2" diameter) 2 $1.00 $2.00 12 Steel Clamp arms 2 $2.00 $4.00 13 Neoprene Handle 1 $4.50 $4.50 14 Misc. Bolts 100 $0.10 $10.00 Mechanical Costs $166.41 $166.41 Total $247.56 $1,872.56 Table 8: Resources NeededList of AnalysesGeneral Durability Analysis o Will focus on estimated material life through life cycle analysis as well as operating needs (proper temperature, proper power, etc.) that must be met for the system to continue to function. Reliability Analysis o Will focus on the ability to perform accurately and precisely over the life of the unit. Prototype Implementation for Analysis Employee Strength Test o Will be tested using force gauges to find the optimal force range for the project. Motion Capture for Production Rates o Daily and weekly production analysis to ensure that the projected production rate is met.Mechanical Analysis of maximum force needed on handle Analysis of mechanical advantage Analysis of minimum pressure needed for plate clamping Analysis of proper sensor placement Analysis of maximum force applied on supports Analysis of tolerance through system 37 | P a g e
  38. 38. Analysis of clamping attachment placement Wear and fatigue testingElectrical Analysis of output power Coding revision and testing Analysis of proper housing placement on jig Analysis of sensor accuracy Analysis of viewing placement of LEDs Analysis of LED placement on rack Analysis LEDs colors and brightness Analysis of filters efficiency Analysis of airflow and operating temperatures Analysis of exhaust vent placement 38 | P a g e
  39. 39. Works Cited1. Dictionary.com, "handicap," in The American Heritage® Stedmans Medical Dictionary. Source location: Houghton Mifflin Company. http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/handicap. [Oct 5, 2011]2. American Fact Finder, U.S. Census Bureau, [Oct 2, 2011] http://factfinder2.census.gov/faces/tableservices/jsf/pages/productview.xhtml?fpt=table3. “About NISH.” Internet: http://www.nish.org/NISH/ [Oct 5, 2011]4. AbilityOne Network Fact Sheet [Oct 4, 2011] http://www.nish.org/NISH/Rooms/DisplayPages/LayoutInitial?Container=com.webridge.enti ty.Entity%5BOID%5B3A204683BB46664D9DEFF5408A4A0613%5D%5D5. “Judging Criteria.” [Oct 5, 2011] http://www.instituteforempowerment.org/design- challenge/judging-criteria6. Specialized Training for Adult Rehabilitation. [Oct 3, 2011] http://www.startinc.org/AboutUs.php7. Better Packages, Inc. “Better Pack® 333 Plus water-activated paper tape dispenser.” 2008. [Oct 5, 2011]http://www.betterpackages.com/products/dispensers/manual/bp333plus.shtml,8. Seattle Robotics Society [Oct 4, 2011] http://www.seattlerobotics.org/guide/infrared.html9. R.A. McIntosh, R. G. Bernier, D. A. Estabrooks. “Stacking System for Fanfold Paper and The Like,” U.S Patent 4,226,410, Oct. 7, 1980.10. Powerpress, Inc. “15 X15 Digital High Press Sublimation Clamp Shell T Shirt Heat Press Transfer Screen Printing Machine.” 2010 [Nov 4 2011]11. Bildr.org. “Are we getting close? Proximity Sensors + Arduino” [Nov 7, 2011] http://bildr.org/2011/03/various-proximity-sensors-arduino/ 39 | P a g e
  40. 40. 12. Acronum.com. “Sample LED” [Dec 6, 2011] http://acronum.com/nz- en/components/com_virtuemart/shop_image/product/RGB_LED_5mm_4_00_4c47d58584e7 8.jpg 40 | P a g e
  41. 41. Appendix AFrom: Carl Hartmann<carlhartmann1@gmail.com>Date: Tue, Oct 18, 2011 at 12:25 PMSubject: Re: NISHTo: John Hughey <jcwh129@siu.edu>Good Morning,We have recently purchased two new tape machines, which brings our total to 4. In fullproduction, if we have the cardboard cut, we can utilize two people per tape machine. Wecurrently have trouble getting the cardboard cut, so we are utilizing only three or fourclients per day. ( We have a large crate building operation which is utilizing our saws inthe woodshop for another 4 weeks. After that we should be able to cut enough cardboardto utilize all of the tape machines.)Presently per client, they are producing 80 - 90 bundles per day, per client. Presently weare producing an average of 250 per day, or about 1200 per week. We are being told, thatthe ideal production, per our customer , is 4,000 per week.Hope this is helpful, please ask if you have other questions.CarlOn Tue, Oct 18, 2011 at 11:15 AM, John Hughey <jcwh129@siu.edu> wrote:Hi Carl,This is John Hughey, the project manager from the NISH design team. For the purpose of our design we werehoping you could provide us with the production figures for the carboard bumpers. When we first toured thefacility Kathy mentioned that the Aluminum Company had recently increased demands so we need to knowhow many units they need per month and how many you are currently producing.Thanks,John Hughey 37 | P a g e
  42. 42. Saluki Engineering Company Senior Engineering Design Center College of Engineering – Mailcode 6603 Carbondale IL 62901-6603 618-453-7837, -7031, -7025 Appendix B Request for Proposals (RFP)9 September 2011Subject: AbilityOne Network Design ChallengeClient: Institute for Economic EmpowermentProject Number: F11-75-NISHSince the passage of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 employers have been required to makeadjustments in the work environment to make reasonable accommodation those with disabilities. The purposeof NISH goes beyond reasonable accommodation to a mission to create employment opportunities for peoplewith severe disabilities by securing federal contracts through the AbilityOne Program for its network ofcommunity-based, nonprofit agencies. In keeping with this mission, the AbilityOne Network Design Challengewas founded to encourage the development of creative technological solutions for barriers that prevent peoplewith disabilities from entering or advancing in the workplace.Saluki Engineering Company, hereinafter SEC, has been appointed Architect-Engineer Coordinator for thereferenced study on behalf of Institute for Economic Empowerment,hereafter Client, to make an engineeringstudy of the referenced project.SEC has divided the work into packages by engineering team capability and will coordinate the overall work.SEC has sent this bid package to three competitive engineering teams, hereinafter Engineer, of equal capabilityincluding your team. SEC is hereby requesting a proposal from Engineer for Client’s approval to do thedefined work. The timeline for this project will be as follows: 42 | P a g e
  43. 43. Saluki Engineering Company Senior Engineering Design Center College of Engineering – Mailcode 6603 Carbondale IL 62901-6603 618-453-7837, -7031, -70258 November 2011 Proposal FINAL draft due posted on website by 11AM. This proposal will be evaluated for compensation (grade in the course).8 November – 17 November 2011 First Design Reviews teams 70-7729 Nov – 8 Dec 2011 Oral presentations of proposals 11:00-11:50 am in EGR A1118 December 2011 Spiral bound hardcopy AND proposal posted to website with required modifications, if any17 January 2012 Phase II work begins.23 February 2012 Progress Reports posted to web space by 1PM19 April 2012 Design Reports (6 copies: 3-ring binder + 4CDs + Website) due at 1PM24-26 April 2012 Demonstrations of projects E215 1PM24-26 April 2012 Presentations of posters E215 1PM (may be required on an earlier date)1-3 May 2012 Design oral presentationsYour proposal will receive conditional acceptance on 12 Dec 2011; you may have to make additional changesin January after Management and Client review it and new data become available. 43 | P a g e
  44. 44. Saluki Engineering Company 9 September 2011 Project # F11-75-NISHSEC Request For Proposal Letter Page 44Engineer will present the drawings, specifications, and explanatory text in a final Design Report together withthe capital cost estimate and schedule to construct, install, or manufacture the product.One written and one oral progress report will be required during the design as indicated above. In addition, one to threedesign review meetings will be required.The proposal, which you will submit by noon according to the attached schedule, must include:1. A cover and title page2. A transmittal letter3. An abstract or executive summary of 300 to 500 words4. A non-disclosure statement5. A table of contents6. An introduction that indicates that you understand the study and why it is being undertaken.7. A literature survey that lays out the following: a. An introduction that outlines the content of the literature review b. what is already known about projects of this type, including similar existing systems c. what the required design procedures are d. the relevant content of the applicable codes and standards e. the relevant materials and components available on the market f. a summary of how the reviewed literature relates to this project8. An over all project description that indicates the subsystems and their relationships to each other, including a site plan or block diagram to visually show how the subsystems are related, and how this system will be different from existing systems9. The design basis10. For each subsystem, a. a description of what each subsystem will be or do b. a description of how each subsystem relates to the other subsystems, including references to the site plan or block diagram to show the relationships, c. a list of the elements which will define the subsystem design, d. a list of deliverables, including all drawings, tables, lists, write-ups and other elements, that you can now identify as probable parts of the Design Report you will submit at the completion of the project e. a list of design activities required to produce the deliverables listed11. A project organization chart indicating project manager and showing for each nominee: name, principal area of responsibility, and discipline (ME, EE, or CpE);12. An action item list that shows detailed action items for the first two weeks and significant action items for weeks thereafter13. Team timeline indicating major design activities and significant milestones in either a. Excel or Word table, b. Microsoft Project, or c. other project tracking software package. [Note that there is a lot of redundancy between 10e, 11, and 12. Be aware that self-consistency is one item on which your proposal will be evaluated.] 44 | P a g e
  45. 45. Saluki Engineering Company 9 September 2011 Project # F11-75-NISHSEC Request For Proposal Letter Page 4514. A list of all resources you will need including space, computers and specialized software required, and including – for design and build projects – a list of all components that you can now anticipate needing and their actual costs, or current location if they are to be borrowed15. List of data analyses, experiments, and simulations to be performed16. Description of what is to be built and demonstrated or software to be written and demonstrated17. An appendix that includes a. the resumes for all candidates for the team b. copies of any communications your team has with Client, other companies, or individuals.Any literature that your team requests that vendors send to the College of Engineering during the course of thewriting of this proposal will be addressed as follows: A. Weston, F. Harackiewicz, or K. Purcell College of Engineering – Mailcode 6603 Southern Illinois University Carbondale IL 62901-6603In addition, any information you request to be faxed should be sent to A. Weston, F. Harackiewicz, or K. Purcell FAX: 618-453-7455 Voice: 618-453-7837 (Weston), -7031 (Harackiewicz) 618-559-6190 (Purcell)Please note: If any material that arrives is sent to YOUR name at the college, you will never see the materialbecause students are not known by name to the mailroom staff. Be sure to give SEC management a memoindicating (1) what and from whom you ordered and (2) the SEC Reference Number of the team that isto get it. This is to alert management to watch for your material and recognize it when it comes in.Engineer will adjust the Scope of Work so that it is suitable for each of the engineers who will be working on the project.If significant design components of the project must be omitted because of time or staff limitations, clearly identify themin your proposal. Your final cost analysis must, in any event, account for them.The attachments to this letter are listed below: 1. Client’s project definition 2. Design Report deliverables checklist 3. Spring 2012 tentative schedule 45 | P a g e
  46. 46. Saluki Engineering Company 9 September 2011 Project # F11-75-NISHSEC Request For Proposal Letter Page 46SEC management looks forward to receiving your proposal. Engineer shall deliver the proposal tothe SIUEngineering College complex in Carbondale, Illinois, addressed to the attention of Dr. F. Harackiewicz andMrs. Purcell, SECs Managers of ECE Projects or Dr. A. Weston, SEC’s Manager of ME Projects.Sincerely,F J HarackiewiczManager of ECE Projects<fran@engr.siu.edu> 46 | P a g e
  47. 47. Saluki Engineering Company 9 September 2011 Project # F11-75-NISHSEC Request For Proposal Letter Page 47Attachment 1 - Project DefinitionClient wants a device or a system that will solve a real workplace problem for at least one group ofseverely handicapped workers.The winning proposal for the device or system will have verifiable, quantified goals. The proposal willdescribe technologies that have been used in the past as well as those currently being used to overcomethe problem. The functional description of the proposed device or system will include a statement ofhow it is different from, and better than, what currently exists. The proposed schedule will allow for atleast three design-build-test-modify iterations. The proposal will incorporate all of the requirements fora winning design.The device or system itself will have complete documentation so that it may be reproduced for use withothers of similar handicap. The documentation will contain a thorough failure analysis and data fromvalidation and revalidation of the design with members of the group it will serve.More information on the design challenge for 2011-2012 can be found here:http://www.instituteforempowerment.org/design-challengeChallenge requirements can be found here:http://www.instituteforempowerment.org/design-challenge/submission-specificationsFor online registration go to:http://www.instituteforempowerment.org/design-challenge/registration/college-entrantsFor Judging criteria:http://www.instituteforempowerment.org/design-challenge/judging-criteriaIn case of a conflict between this RFP and Clients design requests, Clients design requests control. Asnew data become available, Client may give Engineer additional data and criteria that Engineer willincorporate into the design. 47 | P a g e
  48. 48. Saluki Engineering Company 9 September 2011 Project # F11-75-NISHSEC Request For Proposal Letter Page 48Attachment 2 - Design Report Deliverables ChecklistThe proposal Engineer submits will indicate that these items will be included in the Design Report (not the Proposal!):1. A literature review relevant to the design submitted (not a copy of the literature review in this proposal)2. A complete technical description and the results of all work done for all solution options studied3. Equipment, component, materials take-off lists and costs for each solution studied4. Engineering drawings defining the solutions5. A recommended solution and a detailed justification for the choice recommended or implemented, including a Pugh chart or some similar matrix comparison chart that is discussed in the text6. A complete technical description of the recommended system and how it works7. Incorporate into descriptions a summary and the significance of any laboratory work, computer simulations, or mathematical analysis performed.8. A complete engineering specification for the system including all engineering drawings necessary for construction, manufacture, or installation and maintenance and repair9. A complete list of the components and signals in the process, and a list of the ones that are included in the model, if any, with the corresponding part of the model identified10. Tables of performance data – individual subsystem and overall – expected and, for the part that was built, achieved11. Identification of the important technical problems and limitations encountered during design, construction and debugging, e.g., time, accuracy of results, reproducibility of results, limitations on input12. An analysis of electromagnetic compatibility issues and changes necessary in the design to meet EMC code specifications13. A fault analysis of the recommended system, including identification of all faults that could occur, a technical solution to eliminate their consequences, and the cost for incorporating the improvement14. For the working model, Technical Manual that includes a technical description of both the hardware and the software, together with, but not limited to: appropriate hardware engineering drawings and component lists; software flowcharts, listings, and disks; and instructions for construction, maintenance, trouble shooting, and modification15. If a prototype of the device was built, Users Guide for the individual using the prototype, including both instructions on how to connect and use the hardware, how to set up and use the software, what performance can be expected, and what limitations the prototype has16. A conclusion and recommendations section that a. summarizes the performance, b. includes recommendations for improvement, enhancement, and manufacture, and c. discusses the economic, societal, environmental, manufacturability, health, and safety issues related to this project if it is implemented17. An estimate of the amount of capital required to construct, build, manufacture, or install the designed system, whichever is appropriate18. A timeline schedule to construct, build, manufacture, or install the designed system, whichever is appropriate 48 | P a g e
  49. 49. Saluki Engineering Company 9 September 2011 Project # F11-75-NISHSEC Request For Proposal Letter Page 49Attachment 2 - Design Report Deliverables Checklist19. In an appendix: a. the actual itemized cost to construct the prototype, including costs of ruined components and components for options not included in the prototype b. any calculations, spreadsheets, computer simulation results, or other data that should be a part of the report but is too numerous or too bulky to be included in the report itself, this material will be be referenced and summarized in tables in the report, c. formal laboratory reports for all laboratory work performed with the results referenced and summarized in the report, and d. for projects NOT having a working prototype with a Technical Manual, a listing of any software developed as a part of the project. 49 | P a g e
  50. 50. Appendix C 50 | P a g e
  51. 51. 51 | P a g e
  52. 52. 52 | P a g e
  53. 53. Appendix D 53 | P a g e
  54. 54. Benjamin W. Blair13536 Mary’s Creek Rd. (618) 317-1926Sparta, IL 62286 bwblair10@gmail.comOBJECTIVE Seeking full time employment in the mechanical engineering field.EDUCATION Southern Illinois University Carbondale, IL Bachelor of Science in Mechanical GPA: 3.58/4.00 Engineering, May 2012 Related Coursework: Thermodynamics Fluid Mechanics Mechanical Design Internal Combustion Engines Heat Transfer Computer-Aided Drawing Engineering Economics Material SelectionEXPERIENCE Farmhand, Blair Farms Inc. 2006-Present Operated and maintained mechanical equipment, obtaining understanding of how different machines work. Assistant, Sparta Animal Clinic Performed office duties, building skills filing paperwork and improving my customer interaction.SKILLS Computer Skills:Microsoft Office, AutoCAD, C++, MATLABLEADERSHIP AND Academic Scholarship, SIUC, 2008-2010AWARDS Volunteer Track and Field Coach, Sparta High School, 2010-2011 Volunteer Math Team Coach, Sparta High School, 2010 54 | P a g e
  55. 55. Contact info lindeneason@gmail.com 905 East Park Street Apt D5 LINDEN EASON, A.A. Carbondale, IL 62901 (815) 519-3741Objective: To seek an internship position with a company requiring me to utilize my technical abilities and further develop my engineering knowledge.Education: Southern Illinois University Carbondale Major: Electrical And Computer Engineering Cumulative GPA: 3.0/4.0 Major GPA: 3.3/4.0 Expected Graduate Graduation: Fall 2012 Minor: Mathematics Rock Valley College A.A. Cumulative GPA: 3.0/4.0Experience: Southern Illinois University Carbondale - Teacher’s Assistant Fall 2011-present Provided students with diverse ways to approach technical assignments Graded all of the class assignments Foot Locker Inc. – Champs Sports Sales Representative March 2006 – Worked to provide customers with the best customer care September 2007 Helped organize and monitor inventory The Kroger Co. – Hilander Foods Gas Clerk & Deli Worker May 2005 – 2. Managed the gas clerk area December 2005 3. Managed deli areaSkills: MATLAB simulink Visual Studio, C++ Microsoft Office Suite Xilinx Volunteer ACT preparation program Fall 2006-present Work: -Helped to develop students test taking skills Engineering Day SIUC -Hovercraft demonstration Erma Hayes Center -Served as a mentor for children at the Erma Hayes Center Adopt a Spot NSBE -Helped to clean excess garbage off a stretch of roadHonors and Dean’s List Fall 2008Activities: Awarded Smart Grant Fall 09-Spring 11 Awarded Minority Engineering Program Scholarship Fall 2011-Spring 2012Extracurricular National Society of Black Engineers member SIUC Fall 2011-presentActivities: -Helped in the organization of volunteer work, fundraising and events. - Serve as one of the chapter’s senators 55 | P a g e
  56. 56. John C. Hughey jcwh129@siu.edu Permanent Address: College Address: 102 DLK Drive 221 Bailey Hall Anna, IL 62906 1225 Point Drive 618-833-3772 Carbondale, IL 62901 618-536-7979 Objective: A career in computer engineering. Education Southern Illinois University Carbondale (SIUC), Carbondale, Illinois August 2007 - Present Course work toward Bachelors of Science in Computer Engineering with a Minor in Management GPA: 3.0/4.0 Relevant Coursework Digital Circuit Design Intro to Software Engineering Verilog and VHDL SynthesisExperienceResident Assistant, Southern Illinois University Carbondale August 2009-Present Help Residents with both academic and personal issues. Provide programming and other services to help improve the college experience. Help achieve the mission and vision of SIUC University Housing.Cook/Delivery Driver, Pizza Hut Inc. August 2006 – August 2008 Help satisfy customer complaints.SkillsMicrosoft Office Suite: Word, Excel, PowerPointAwards & HonorsCollege of Engineering Scholarship Fall 2008 – Spring 2010Dean’s List, SIUC Spring 2007 – Fall 2008ActivitiesResidence Halls of Horror – Director, Room Coordinator Fall 2009 – Fall 2011Thompson Point Executive Council (TPEC) – Vice President Fall 2008 – Spring 2009SIUC Leadership Council Fall 2007 – Spring 2008 56 | P a g e
  57. 57. Jordan John Permanent Address Cell: 618-303-0975 School Address (Until 5/15/2012) 13132 Fenwick Street Email: jjohn89@siu.edu 900 S. Elizabeth Street Fishers, IN 46037 Apartment #3 Carbondale, IL 62901Objective An entry level position in Mechanical Engineering beginning May 2012.Skills Excellent written and oral communication skills Numerous leadership experiences Works well in a team or an independent settingEducation Southern IllinoisUniversity; Carbondale, Illinois Carbondale, Illinois 62901 Pursuing Bachelor’s in Mechanical Engineering Pursuing Minor in Mathematics Projected Graduation Date: Spring 2012 GPA: 3.19/4.00Specialized  CAD/CAM  Material ScienceCourse  Energy in Society  Material Selection for DesignWork  Energy Systems and Management  Pneumatic/Hydraulic DesignRelevant Boeing Integrated Defense Systems Externship - Joint Helmet Mounted Cueing SystemWork (JHMCS) integration for F-15’s and F/A 18’s; St. Louis, MO (March 2011)Experience SIUC Resident Assistant; SIUC University Housing (August 2009-May 2010) SIUC College of Engineering Peer Mentor; SIUC University Housing (August 2008-May 2009)Relevant Vacuum Flask Drinking Apparatus (Spring 2011)Projects Individualized design of flask with in depth material selection based on Thermos® technology “A Renewable Home”: A Project on Sustainability and Renewable Energy Sources for the Modern Home (Spring 2009) Project Manager Research and development of a completely self-sustained living unit complete with energy flow analysis and renewable energy systems designAwards SIUC Dean’s List and College of Engineering Honor Roll (Fall 2007, Summer 2009) Two time recipient of the Highway District #9 Engineering Scholarship (Fall 2008, Fall 2009) Phi Sigma Kappa Fraternity 2008-2009 “Brother of the Year”Activities Order of Omega Honor Society (April 2010-Present) Golden Key Honor Society (October 2008-Present) Alpha Lambda Delta Honor Society (May 2008-Present) Phi Sigma Kappa Fraternity (May 2008-Present)  President (November 2009-November 2010)  Vice-President (November 2010-April 2010) 57 | P a g e

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