Meeting the needs of children and families
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Meeting the needs of children and families

on

  • 172 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
172
Views on SlideShare
161
Embed Views
11

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0

1 Embed 11

http://wenpingliang.pbworks.com 11

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment
  • Good morning, Chirs. My name is Wenping Liang. Today I am going to do my persentation about Meeting the Needs of Children and Families. <br />
  • My case study scenario is talking about a boy with Down Syndrome who named Jack. He is five years old and new to Toronto with his parents. He is friendly and outgoing, but he has little language skill and that affect his social interaction with others. I think Jack and his family might need to find a family doctor, so that he can get whatever treatment he needs. Jack need to improve his language development and facilitate his friendship with other children. He might need to find a cub that children with Down Syndrome could stay together,not see themself as specials and develop their friendship; also, their parents could stay together to share experience and resource with each other. As newcomers to Toronto, Jack&apos;s family might need help on how to find a place (transportation). His family might need help on finding the affordable housing. His parents might need help to find jobs. They might need help on how to get subsidize for daycare. <br />
  • What is Down Syndrom? &quot;Down Syndrom is a genentic discorder caused by the presence of all or part of a third copy of chromosome 21.&quot;(From wikipedia) It always come with physical and language growth delay, characteristis facial features and intellectual disability. Their IQ is much lower than average people&apos;s. For example, the average IQ of a young adult with Down Syndrome just similar to that of an 8 or 9 years old child. <br /> Resource: <br /> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Down_syndrome <br />
  • &quot;People with Down syndrome may have some or all of the following physical characteristics: a small chin, slanted eyes, poor muscle tone, a flat nasal bridge, a single crease of the palm, and a protruding tongue due to a small mouth and large tongue. These airway changes lead to obstructive sleep apnea in around half of those with Down syndrome. Other common features include: a flat and wide face, a short neck, excessive joint flexibility, extra space between big toe and second toe, abnormal patterns on the fingertips and short fingers.&quot;; &quot;Growth in height is slower resulting in adults who tend to have short stature—the average height for men is 154 cm (5 feet 1 inch) and for women is 142 cm (4 feet 8 inches).&quot; (From Wikipedia) <br /> Resource: <br /> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Down_syndrome <br />
  • &quot;Most individuals with Down syndrome have mild (IQ: 50–70) or moderate (IQ: 35–50) intellectual disability with some cases having severe (IQ: 20–35) difficulties. Those with mosaic Down syndrome typically have IQ scores 10–30 points higher. As they age people with Down syndrome typically perform less well compared to their same-age peers. Some after 30 years of age may lose their ability to speak. This syndrome causes about a third of cases of intellectual disability. Many developmental milestones are delayed with the ability to crawl typically occurring around 8 months rather than 5 month and the ability to walk independently typically occurring around 21 months rather than 14 months. <br /> Commonly individuals with Down syndrome have better language understanding than ability to speak. Between 10 and 45 percent have either a stutter or rapid and irregular speech, making it difficult to understand them. They typically do fairly well with social skills&quot;.(From Wikipedia) <br /> Resource: <br /> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Down_syndrome <br />
  • &quot;Hearing and vision disorders occur in more than half of people with Down syndrome. Vision problems occur in 38 to 80%. Between 20 and 50% have strabismus, in which the two eyes do not move together.&quot;;&quot;Hearing problems are found in 50–90% of children with Down syndrome. This is often the result of otitis media with effusion which occurs in 50–70% and chronic ear infections which occurs in 40 to 60%. Ear infections often begin in the first year of life and are partly due to poor eustachian tube function. Excessive ear wax can also cause hearing loss due to obstruction of the outer ear canal. Even a mild degree of hearing loss can have negative consequences for speech, language understanding and academics. Additionally, it is important to rule out hearing loss as a factor in social and cognitive deterioration.&quot;(From Wikipedia) <br /> Resource: <br /> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Down_syndrome <br />
  • &quot;The rate of congenital heart disease in newborns with Down syndrome is around 40%. Of those with heart heart disease about 80% have an atrioventricular septal defect or ventricular septal defect. Mitral valve problems become common as people age, even in those without heart problems at birth. Other problems that may occur include: tetralogy of Fallot and patent ductus arteriosus. People with Down syndrome have a lower risk of hardening of the arteries&quot;(From Wikipedia) <br /> Resource: <br /> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Down_syndrome <br />
  • &quot;Problems of the thyroid gland occur in 20–50% of individuals with Down syndrome. Low thyroid is the most common form, occurring in almost half of all individuals. Thyroid problems can be due to a poorly or non functioning thyroid at birth (known as congenital hypothyroidism) which occurs in 1% or can develop later due to an attack on the thyroid by the immune system resulting in Graves disease or autoimmune hypothyroidism. Type 1 diabetes mellitus is also more common.&quot;(From Wikipedia) <br /> Resource: <br /> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Down_syndrome <br />
  • &quot;Although the overall risk of cancer is not changed; there is an increased risk of leukemia and testicular cancer and a reduced risk of solid cancers. Solid cancers are believed to be less common due to increased expression of tumor suppressor genes present on chromosome 21.Cancers of the blood are 10 to 15 times more common in children with Down syndrome. &quot;(From Wikipedia) <br /> Resource: <br /> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Down_syndrome <br />
  • &quot;Constipation occurs in nearly half of people with Down syndrome and may result in changes in behavior. One potential cause is Hirschsprung&apos;s disease, which is due to a lack of nerve cells controlling the colon, which occurs in 2 to 15%. Other frequent congenital problems include: duodenal atresia, pyloric stenosis, Meckel diverticulum and imperforate anus. Celiac disease affects about 7–20% and gastroesophageal reflux disease is also more common.&quot;(From Wikipedia) <br /> Resource: <br /> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Down_syndrome <br />
  • &quot;Males with Down syndrome usually do not father children, while females have lower rates of fertility relative those who are unaffected. Fertility is estimated to be present in 30–50% of women. Menopause typically occurs at an earlier age. The poor fertility in men is thought to be due to problems with sperm development; however, it may also be related to not being sexually active. As of 2006 there have been three recorded instances of males with Down syndrome fathering children and 26 cases of women having children. Without assisted reproductive technologies, approximately half of the pregnancies of someone with Down syndrome will also have the syndrome.&quot;(From Wikipedia) <br /> Resource: <br /> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Down_syndrome <br />
  • &quot;Because of improved health care, at 30 years of age, 79% of individuals with Down Syndrome who do not have congenital heart disease are surviving and 50% with heart defects are living. In the past,most adults with Down Syndrome were placed in institutions. Today, most adults with Down Syndrome live with their parents or semi-independently in supported living environments. They participate in volunteer work, are employed in supported work environments, and enjoy social and recreational activities.&quot; (Batshaw,Mark L., P228) <br /> In this case, children with Down Syndrome need to develop their skills for their future independent living. They need learn self-care skills, communication skills and decision making skills to prepare their lifes in the community. Also, they need to learn how to facilitate friendships with others. As their ECE, we need to help them to learn those skills for their furture life. <br /> Resource: <br /> Batshaw, Mark L.. When your child has a disability: the complete sourcebook of daily and medical care. Rev. ed. Baltimore, MD: Paul H. Brookes Pub. Co., 2001. Print. <br />
  • If I has Jack in my room, I will teach him tirelessly with his self-care skills. Because I know that is very important to him and he need to do more efford than other typical children when he learn something new. I will task analysis of the self-care skills for him and base on his learning level to smaller the steps. I will be patiented with him on his learning. There are lots of self-care skills in our daily life. For example, how to drink from a cup; how to put on his snowpants; how to put on his jacket; how to use spoon to eat; how to tidy up toys; and so on. I know that is not easy for him to learn those skills, but I will keep on trying. I believe one day he will grasp the skills. <br />
  • We, as Early Childhood Educator, need to give verbal response to children as much as we could. In those progresses could help children to learn the language and to response. It is same for the children with Down Syndrome. &quot;You need to give the message that speech and language are a good way for your child to get attention. You can do this by responding to vocalizations with attention and a verbal response. Daily &apos;reading&apos; from a picture book, even for only 5 minutes, gives the powerful message that reading and books are part of each day and are fun.&quot;(Batshaw,Mark L., P229) <br /> Also, sign language is a good way to help children to communicate with others when their language is not develop good enough. &quot;If he or she has not as yet developed the language skills to communicate basic needs and wants, use of sign language in conjunction with speech is recommended. these methods will help your child to communicate while he or she learns verbal communication skills.&quot;(Batshaw,Mark L., P229) <br /> Resource: <br /> Batshaw, Mark L.. When your child has a disability: the complete sourcebook of daily and medical care. Rev. ed. Baltimore, MD: Paul H. Brookes Pub. Co., 2001. Print. <br />
  • Firstly, we need to help them separating the &quot;good thing&quot; from the &quot;bad thing&quot;. Secondly, we guide them to know what result will cause if they choose&quot;good thing&quot;/ &quot;bad thing&quot;. Thirdly, help them to finger out what they really want. Finally, help them to choose what they want. In these way to help the children to develop their decision-making skills. <br />
  • I will promote pro-social skill in the room with all the children. Teach the typical children to act with patience and develop their sympathy on someone who need help. In the meantime, I will help Jack to start to talk with them, to state what he wants, what he feels and reponse to the others. These would benefit all the children. <br /> &quot;As with any child, your child with Down Syndrome will have friends who come and go. The efforts that you put into developing your child&apos;s communication and social skills will help your child to make and keep friends.&quot;;&quot;You can help your child learn the first step in approaching other people by suggesting things to do and say. Short play dates that include only one other child can be good experiences and give you and your child a chance to talk about the activity later. You should include as possible friends both children with and without special needs.&quot;(Batshaw,Mark L., P229) <br /> Resource: <br /> Batshaw, Mark L.. When your child has a disability: the complete sourcebook of daily and medical care. Rev. ed. Baltimore, MD: Paul H. Brookes Pub. Co., 2001. Print. <br />
  • For Jack’s family, I will do research on agencies that could help them and privide them resource. I will fouse on Improve Jack’s language development;facilitate Jack’s friendships; find a family doctor; find a cub(child with Down Syndrome) to join; Transportation----How to find a place? ; affordable housing; job seeking for parents; subsidize for daycare, and so on. After I find the useful information, I will prink it out and put them on the resource place to invite parents to have it. <br />
  • Down Syndrome Association of Toronto is a charitable, non-profit organization. They support families & individuals with Down Syndrome by providing them different useful information. They provide opportunities for people with special need for socializing in different activities. When you click on the link, it will link you into their website with variety social activities. For example, DramaWay activity is process-based arts program. It provides opportunities for individuals of all abilities on theatre, dance, film, music, visual arts and even puppetry. Children learn to interact with each other when they are playing. <br /> Aisling Discoveries Child and Family Centre is another non-profit organization for children and families who have social, emotional or behavioral problems. This agency is accredited by Children’s Mental Health Ontario. They are located in east Toronto and services are provided around East York and Scarborough. They provide variety programs about helping the children manage their behavior, help them to learn how to associate with the others, improve their speech and language skills, and so on. When you click on the link, you will find lots of programs that helping children in different areas. <br /> Jack need to improve his language development and facilitate his friendship with other children. He might need to find a cub that children with Down Syndrome could stay together, not see themself as specials and develop their friendship; also, their parents could stay together to share experience and resource with each other. <br /> The activities that those agencies provides are good ways for Jack to practice his language skills and get improve. Also, they would give him much opportunity to interact with the others and facilitate his communication skills and friendship with other children. Also, his parents could share experience with other parents and get resource and help from the agencies. <br /> Resource: <br /> http://www.dsat.ca/social-activities <br /> http://www.aislingdiscoveries.on.ca/what_we_do/intro <br />
  • Find a family doctor: on this website, it would tell you how to find a family doctor in Toronto. For example, you need to apply for a Health Card(OHIP), then how to find a family doctor, how to choose one that suit you. Also, it answers questions on different areas about health. <br /> Affordable housing means that you pay your monthly rent by 30% of the amount that you earn each month. It is base on how much you earn, not the size or type of housing you live in. When you click on the link on the PPT, it would explain to you detailedly on what is subsidize housing, are you eligible for applying one, their waiting list, and how to apply for one. <br /> Transportation----How to find a place? On the first two websites, you would know how to get your Driver’s Licence and get some knowledge about the driving rules. After you get your driver licence, and buy a car with a GPS, you can go wherever you want, even you have never been there. <br /> Also, the third link under the Transportation section could link you to the Google Map. You can find your way to the new places on this website. When you type both of your addresses about your start point and your final point, it would explain to you with pictures clearly about how to get there. <br /> Job seeking for parents: By reading this webpage, you would know that you need to apply for a Social Insurance Number (SIM) before you find a job in Toronto. It would tell you how to apply the SIM Card ; how to write your resume; what you need to prepare for your interview; the websites about job posting, and so on <br /> Subsidize for daycare: On this website, you would know who can apply the subsidy for daycare, how to apply it, and the other benefits for the families (For example, Canada Child Tax Benefit). <br /> Resource: <br /> http://www.settlement.org/topics.asp?section=HE:FDOC <br /> http://www.mto.gov.on.ca/english/dandv/driver/handbook/section1.0.0.shtml <br /> http://www.ontario.ca/driving-and-roads/driving-and-roads <br /> https://www.google.ca/maps/dir///@43.6568775,-79.32085,10z/data=!4m4!4m3!1m0!1m0!3e3?hl=zh-CN <br /> http://www.settlement.org/sys/faqs_detail.asp?k=SUBHO_SUBHO&faq_id=4001299 <br /> http://www.settlement.org/topics.asp?section=EM:FAJ <br /> http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/childcare/paying.html#subsidy <br />

Meeting the needs of children and families Meeting the needs of children and families Presentation Transcript

  • Meeting the Needs of Children and Families By : Wenping Liang
  • Introduction to the child & family What possible need Jack (a 5-year-old boy with Down Syndrome) and his family might have? • Improve Jack's language development • Facilitate Jack's friendships • Find a family doctor • Find a cub(child with Down Syndrome) to join • Transportation----How to find a place? • Affordable housing • Job seeking for parents • Subsidize for daycare
  • Introduction to the individual special need What is Down Syndrome ? "Down syndrome (DS) or Down's syndrome, also known as trisomy 21, is a genetic disorder caused by the presence of all or part of a third copy of chromosome 21. It is typically associated with physical growth delays, characteristic facial features and mild to moderate intellectual disability. The average IQ of a young adult with Down syndrome is 50, similar to the mental age of an 8 or 9 year old child, but this varies widely." (From Wikipedia)
  • Introduction to the individual special need (Continuing...) The range of characteristics about Down Syndrome: 1. physical characteristics: • a small chin • slanted eyes • poor muscle tone • a flat nasal bridge • a single crease of the palm • a protruding tongue due to a small mouth and large tongue • a flat and wide face • a short neck • excessive joint flexibility • extra space between big toe and second toe • abnormal patterns on the fingertips and short fingers • short stature (From Wikipedia)
  • Introduction to the individual special need (Continuing...) The range of characteristics about Down Syndrome: 2. Neurological: • Intellectual disability • May lose their ability to speak • Many developmental milestones are delayed • Better language understanding than ability to speak • Their language is hard to understand by the others (From Wikipedia) Mild(IQ:50--70) Moderate (IQ: 35–50) Severe (IQ: 20–35) Mosaic(10–30 points higher)
  • Introduction to the individual special need (Continuing...) The range of characteristics about Down Syndrome: 3.Senses: • Vision problems: occur in 38 to 80%of children with Down syndrome. (Between 20 and 50% have strabismus, in which the two eyes do not move together.) • Hearing problems: found in 50–90% of children with Down syndrome (From Wikipedia)
  • Introduction to the individual special need (Continuing...) The range of characteristics about Down Syndrome: 4. Heart: • 40% of them have heart disease from newborns • Mitral valve problem become common when they get older, even those without heart problems at birth • Tetralogy of Fallot • Patent ductus arteriosus • Have a lower risk of hardening of the arteries (From Wikipedia)
  • Introduction to the individual special need (Continuing...) The range of characteristics about Down Syndrome: 6. Endocrine • Problems of the thyroid gland occur in 20–50% of individuals with Down syndrome. • Low thyroid is the most common form, occurring in almost half of all individuals. • Type 1 diabetes mellitus is also more common. (From Wikipedia)
  • Introduction to the individual special need (Continuing...) The range of characteristics about Down Syndrome: 5. Cancer: • The overall risk of cancer is not changed • An increased risk of leukemia and testicular cancer • A reduced risk of solid cancers • Cancers of the blood are 10 to 15 times more common in children with Down syndrome (From Wikipedia)
  • Introduction to the individual special need (Continuing...) The range of characteristics about Down Syndrome: 7.Gastrointestinal: • Constipation occurs in nearly half of people with Down syndrome • duodenal atresia • pyloric stenosis • Meckel diverticulum • Imperforate anus (From Wikipedia)
  • Introduction to the individual special need (Continuing...) The range of characteristics about Down Syndrome: 8. Fertility • Males with Down syndrome usually do not father children, while females have lower rates of fertility relative those who are unaffected. • Fertility is estimated to be present in 30–50% of women.Menopause typically occurs at an earlier age. • The poor fertility in men is thought to be due to problems with sperm development; however, it may also be related to not being sexually active. • Without assisted reproductive technologies, approximately half of the pregnancies of someone with Down syndrome will also have the syndrome (From Wikipedia)
  • Meeting the needs in the child care centre What are the need for the child with Down Syndrome?(What skills do they need for their future life?) • Self-care skills • Communication skills • Decision making skills • Facilitate their friendships with others
  • Meeting the needs in the child care centre (Continuing...) Self-care skills: • how to drink from a cup; • how to put on his snowpants; • how to put on his jacket; • how to use spoon to eat; • how to tidy up toys
  • Meeting the needs in the child care centre (Continuing...) Communication skills: • Verbal response • Sign language communicate
  • Meeting the needs in the child care centre (Continuing...) Decision-making skills: • Separete "good thing" from "bad thing" • Guide them to understant the result • Help them to finger out what they really want • Help them to choose what they want
  • Meeting the needs in the child care centre (Continuing...) Facilitate their friendships with others: • Suggest what Jack should do/say with his new friends • Short play dates with a "friend" • Talk about the "date" with Jack after
  • Meeting the needs in the child care centre (Continuing...) I will fouse on the needs of Jack's family and find resource for them(provide relate agencies): • Improve Jack's language development • Facilitate Jack's friendships • Find a family doctor • Find a cub(child with Down Syndrome) to join • Transportation----How to find a place? • Affordable housing • Job seeking for parents • Subsidize for daycare
  • Overview of referred agencies and Resources • Down Syndrome Association Of Toronto---- http://www.dsat.ca/social-activities • Aisling Discoveries Child and Family Centre ---http://www.aislingdiscoveries.on.ca/what_we _do/intro
  • Overview of referred agencies and Resources • Find a family doctor: http://www.settlement.org/topics.asp?section=HE:FDOC • Transportation----How to find a place? http://www.mto.gov.on.ca/english/dandv/driver/handbook/section1.0.0.shtml http://www.ontario.ca/driving-and-roads/driving-and-roads https://www.google.ca/maps/dir///@43.6568775,-79.32085,10z/data=!4m4!4m3!1m0!1m0! 3e3?hl=zh-CN • Affordable housing: http://www.settlement.org/sys/faqs_detail.asp?k=SUBHO_SUBHO&faq_id=4001299 • Job seeking for parents: http://www.settlement.org/topics.asp?section=EM:FAJ • Subsidize for daycare http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/childcare/paying.html#subsidy
  • Reference • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Down_syndrome • Batshaw, Mark L.. When your child has a disability: the complete sourcebook of daily and medical care. Rev. ed. Baltimore, MD: Paul H. Brookes Pub. Co., 2001. Print. • http://www.dsat.ca/social-activities • http://www.aislingdiscoveries.on.ca/what_we_do/intro • http://www.settlement.org/topics.asp?section=HE:FDOC • http://www.mto.gov.on.ca/english/dandv/driver/handbook/section1.0.0.s html • http://www.ontario.ca/driving-and-roads/driving-and-roads • https://www.google.ca/maps/dir///@43.6568775,-79.32085,10z/data=! 4m4!4m3!1m0!1m0!3e3?hl=zh-CN • http://www.settlement.org/sys/faqs_detail.asp? k=SUBHO_SUBHO&faq_id=4001299 • http://www.settlement.org/topics.asp?section=EM:FAJ • http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/childcare/paying.html#subsidy
  • Reflection
  • Thank You !