Lifelong Learning

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Presentation by Ann Emery and Nadia Jamil to students in the George Mason University College of Education and Human Development. Presented December 2012 in Fairfax, Virginia.

Thinking about lifelong learning... How do adult learners and child learners differ? What learning settings are available for adults? What are the pros and cons of each setting? Why does so professional development often fail?

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  • Dear Ann,the slides are really useful.I would like to uase them for my classes on Lifelong learning.I appreciate your support and permission and pls send me the ppt to lachucr@yahoo.com
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  • Hi, we’re Nadia Jamil and Ann Emery. Our presentation is about workforce learning.
  • For most of us, [this] is right around the corner. Woohoo! We’re taking our last few courses, getting ready to graduate and fully enter the working world. So what’s next? We’re done with classes, but will we be done with learning?
  • Throughout this course, we kept thinking about this. What’s next?1) How do you continue learning after graduation?2) How are adult learners similar to and different than children?3) What are the pros and cons of each learning mode?4) Why does training fail
  • Throughout this course, we kept thinking about this. What’s next?1) How do you continue learning after graduation?2) How are adult learners similar to and different than children?3) What are the pros and cons of each learning mode?4) Why does training fail
  • Throughout this course, we kept thinking about this. What’s next?1) How do you continue learning after graduation?2) How are adult learners similar to and different than children?3) What are the pros and cons of each learning mode?4) Why does training fail
  • Children:Dependent on rules/instructions, under their teacher's guidance and as such, the one giving instructions has full command of the child's learning.Adults:Adults are independent, evaluate themselves or the things around them.
  • Children:Children bring little experience when they are faced with a learning activity. This makes them listen more and be influenced by their teachers.Adults:Adults have a wealth of resources owing to their experiences, which form a large part of their identity
  • Children:Children follow levels of instruction in order to progress to a higher level of learning.Adults:Adults are guided by their own need to learn.
  • Children:Children’s way of learning is by subject matter, without having a sense of immediacy. They are not yet conscious if the lessons they face bear deeper meaning in their lives.Adults:Adults have a perspective of seeing learning as a means to solve an existing problem or concern in their lives.
  • Children:Children are often motivated by external factors like competition, peer pressure or consequences of failure.Adults:Adults are driven mostly by emotions and an aspiration to be better versions of themselves; from self-esteem to self-actualization, adults act upon internal motivators.
  • Finally, we looked at more ways that adults learn:Participation: Involvement in learning processOpportunity to Visualize: Need to see how things work Time to process: Think, Talk & EvaluateOpportunity to Generalize: Relatedness in writing/speakingApply: Performing the task
  • How have you continued learning since you finished undergrad? How will you continue learning once you’re finished with this graduate program? (Class discussion)
  • We brainstormed a big list. Here’s what we came up with. We listed courses here, because you could certainly go on to complete more graduate coursework, a graduate certificate, or another graduate degree.People talk about “on the job” learning all the time. But what does that really mean? Here’s how we operationalized “on the job” learning – as apprenticeships (when you’re assisting someone more senior, getting feedback along the way, and getting more responsibility as you progress), by reading books or eBooks, by attending brown bags, etc.
  • So that’s a lot of different learning formats. There are obviously pros and cons of each format.
  • So we brainstormed some more. We came up with a few criteria.
  • We brainstormed a big list. Here’s what we came up with. We listed courses here, because you could certainly go on to complete more graduate coursework, a graduate certificate, or another graduate degree.People talk about “on the job” learning all the time. But what does that really mean? Here’s how we operationalized “on the job” learning – as apprenticeships (when you’re assisting someone more senior, getting feedback along the way, and getting more responsibility as you progress), by reading books or eBooks, by attending brown bags, etc.
  • We brainstormed a big list. Here’s what we came up with. We listed courses here, because you could certainly go on to complete more graduate coursework, a graduate certificate, or another graduate degree.People talk about “on the job” learning all the time. But what does that really mean? Here’s how we operationalized “on the job” learning – as apprenticeships (when you’re assisting someone more senior, getting feedback along the way, and getting more responsibility as you progress), by reading books or eBooks, by attending brown bags, etc.
  • We brainstormed a big list. Here’s what we came up with. We listed courses here, because you could certainly go on to complete more graduate coursework, a graduate certificate, or another graduate degree.People talk about “on the job” learning all the time. But what does that really mean? Here’s how we operationalized “on the job” learning – as apprenticeships (when you’re assisting someone more senior, getting feedback along the way, and getting more responsibility as you progress), by reading books or eBooks, by attending brown bags, etc.
  • We brainstormed a big list. Here’s what we came up with. We listed courses here, because you could certainly go on to complete more graduate coursework, a graduate certificate, or another graduate degree.People talk about “on the job” learning all the time. But what does that really mean? Here’s how we operationalized “on the job” learning – as apprenticeships (when you’re assisting someone more senior, getting feedback along the way, and getting more responsibility as you progress), by reading books or eBooks, by attending brown bags, etc.
  • Keller said there were 4 conditions that must be met to have a motivated learner:Gaining and sustaining attentionEnhancing relevanceBuilding confidenceGenerating satisfaction – through natural consequences, positive consequences, and equity
  • So that’s a lot of different learning formats. There are obviously pros and cons of each format.
  • So that’s a lot of different learning formats. There are obviously pros and cons of each format.
  • So hopefully you learned 4 things during this presentation that help you both as a learner and as an instructor:Adults and children differLots of learning settings and modes are available Pros and cons of each modeNot all of this training is good – there are some common reasons why workforce training fails
  • Thanks! That’s the end of our presentation. We hope you enjoyed learning about workforce training. If you’d like to contact us, please feel free to email us later. Thanks!
  • Lifelong Learning

    1. 1. Lifelong LearningAnn Emery & Nadia Jamil George Mason University College of Education and Human Development December 2012
    2. 2. imagine…
    3. 3. …you’re a studentat a large university…
    4. 4. …end of the semester…
    5. 5. …stressed out!
    6. 6. reallystressed out!
    7. 7. thinking about graduation?
    8. 8. thinking about jobs?
    9. 9. does learning end?
    10. 10. what do youwant to learn?
    11. 11. what do youneed to learn?
    12. 12. LifelongLearning
    13. 13. Adults vs. children?Lifelong Learninglearning? settings? Lifelong learning?
    14. 14. Adults vs. children?Lifelong Learninglearning? settings? Lifelong learning?
    15. 15. Adults vs. children?Lifelong Learninglearning? settings? Lifelong Failed learning? training?
    16. 16. How dochildren and adults differ?
    17. 17. Independence Level Dependent on rules and instructions Independent
    18. 18. Experience Little experience, so they listen more and are influenced by teachers Wealth of resources
    19. 19. Readiness Follow levels ofinstruction to progress toa higher level of learning Guided by their own need to learn
    20. 20. Orientation to Learning Lessons not immediately applicable to their lives Learning is a means to solve an existing problem
    21. 21. Motivation External factors (competition, peer pressure, consequences of failure) Internal factors (emotions, aspirations to improve)
    22. 22. How do adults learn? Participate Apply Visualize Generalize Time
    23. 23. What types oflearning settings are available for adults?
    24. 24. Traditional courses
    25. 25. Apprenticeships
    26. 26. Blogging
    27. 27. Blogging
    28. 28. LinkedIn discussions
    29. 29. Podcasts
    30. 30. MOOCs
    31. 31. Learning Settings• Apprenticeships • Listservs• Blogging • MOOCs• Books and eBooks • Online training courses• Book clubs • Podcasts• Brown bags • Radio• Courses/degrees • Screen sharing• Conference presentations • Skype, Google hangouts• eLibraries • Twitter• gChat • Videoconferencing• Journal articles • Videos (TV, DVDs, YouTube)• Journaling • Webinars• LinkedIn discussions • Workshops
    32. 32. What are the pros and consof each setting?
    33. 33. Logistical Considerations• Price• Prerequisites/prior experience• Time• Energy• Face-to-face vs. online• Observing vs. doing
    34. 34. Ed Psych Considerations 4 Principles Gagne’s 9 Events Keller’s ARCS
    35. 35. 4 Principles Learning is Active Learning is Social4 Principles Learning Occurs in Context Learning is Reflective
    36. 36. Learning is Active• Apprenticeships • Listservs• Blogging • MOOCs• Books and eBooks • Online training courses• Book clubs • Podcasts• Brown bags • Radio• Courses/degrees • Screen sharing• Conference presentations • Skype, Google hangouts• eLibraries • Twitter• gChat • Videoconferencing• Journal articles • Videos (TV, DVDs, YouTube)• Journaling • Webinars• LinkedIn discussions • Workshops
    37. 37. Learning is Social• Apprenticeships • Listservs• Blogging • MOOCs• Books and eBooks • Online training courses• Book clubs • Podcasts• Brown bags • Radio• Courses/degrees • Screen sharing• Conference presentations • Skype, Google hangouts• eLibraries • Twitter• gChat • Videoconferencing• Journal articles • Videos (TV, DVDs, YouTube)• Journaling • Webinars• LinkedIn discussions • Workshops
    38. 38. Learning Occurs in Context• Apprenticeships • Listservs• Blogging • MOOCs• Books and eBooks • Online training courses• Book clubs • Podcasts• Brown bags • Radio• Courses/degrees • Screen sharing• Conference presentations • Skype, Google hangouts• eLibraries • Twitter• gChat • Videoconferencing• Journal articles • Videos (TV, DVDs, YouTube)• Journaling • Webinars• LinkedIn discussions • Workshops
    39. 39. Learning is Reflective• Apprenticeships • Listservs• Blogging • MOOCs• Books and eBooks • Online training courses• Book clubs • Podcasts• Brown bags • Radio• Courses/degrees • Screen sharing• Conference presentations • Skype, Google hangouts• eLibraries • Twitter• gChat • Videoconferencing• Journal articles • Videos (TV, DVDs, YouTube)• Journaling • Webinars• LinkedIn discussions • Workshops
    40. 40. Gagne’s Theory of Instruction 1. Gaining attention 2. Informing learners of the objective 3. Stimulating recall of prior information 4. Presenting the content 9 5. Providing learning guidanceEvents 6. Eliciting performance 7. Providing feedback 8. Assessing performance 9. Enhancing memory and transfer
    41. 41. Online Live Gagne’s 9 Events courses webinars Podcasts1. Gaining attention2. Informing learners of theobjective3. Stimulating recall of priorinformation4. Presenting the content5. Providing learning guidance6. Eliciting performance7. Providing feedback8. Assessing performance9. Enhancing memory andtransfer
    42. 42. Online Live Gagne’s 9 Events courses webinars Podcasts1. Gaining attention2. Informing learners of theobjective3. Stimulating recall of priorinformation4. Presenting the content5. Providing learning guidance6. Eliciting performance7. Providing feedback8. Assessing performance9. Enhancing memory andtransfer
    43. 43. Online Live Gagne’s 9 Events courses webinars Podcasts1. Gaining attention2. Informing learners of theobjective3. Stimulating recall of priorinformation4. Presenting the content5. Providing learning guidance6. Eliciting performance7. Providing feedback8. Assessing performance9. Enhancing memory andtransfer
    44. 44. Online Live Gagne’s 9 Events courses webinars Podcasts1. Gaining attention2. Informing learners of theobjective3. Stimulating recall of priorinformation4. Presenting the content5. Providing learning guidance6. Eliciting performance7. Providing feedback8. Assessing performance9. Enhancing memory andtransfer
    45. 45. Online Live Gagne’s 9 Events courses webinars Podcasts1. Gaining attention2. Informing learners of theobjective3. Stimulating recall of priorinformation4. Presenting the content5. Providing learning guidance6. Eliciting performance7. Providing feedback8. Assessing performance9. Enhancing memory andtransfer
    46. 46. Keller’s ARCS Attention: Gaining and sustaining attention Relevance: Enhancing relevanceKeller’s ARCS Confidence: Building confidence Satisfaction: Generating satisfaction
    47. 47. Online Live Keller’s ARCS courses webinars PodcastsAttention:Gaining and sustainingattentionRelevance:Enhancing relevanceConfidence:Building confidenceSatisfaction:Generating satisfaction
    48. 48. Online Live Keller’s ARCS courses webinars PodcastsAttention:Gaining and sustainingattentionRelevance:Enhancing relevanceConfidence:Building confidenceSatisfaction:Generating satisfaction
    49. 49. Online Live Keller’s ARCS courses webinars PodcastsAttention:Gaining and sustainingattentionRelevance:Enhancing relevanceConfidence:Building confidenceSatisfaction:Generating satisfaction
    50. 50. Online Live Keller’s ARCS courses webinars PodcastsAttention:Gaining and sustainingattentionRelevance:Enhancing relevanceConfidence:Building confidenceSatisfaction:Generating satisfaction
    51. 51. Why doestraining fail?
    52. 52. Trainers • Most of us aren’t trained to trainContent • Too much content is coveredEducation • Training viewed as educationMentality • Classroom mentalityDumping • Get details from NadiaFollow-Up • Lack of follow-up after training
    53. 53. Trainers • Most of us aren’t trained to trainContent • Too much content is coveredEducation • Training viewed as educationMentality • Classroom mentalityDumping • Get details from NadiaFollow-Up • Lack of follow-up after training
    54. 54. Trainers • Most of us aren’t trained to trainContent • Too much content is coveredEducation • Training viewed as educationMentality • Classroom mentalityDumping • Get details from NadiaFollow-Up • Lack of follow-up after training
    55. 55. Trainers • Most of us aren’t trained to trainContent • Too much content is coveredEducation • Training viewed as educationMentality • Classroom mentalityDumping • Get details from NadiaFollow-Up • Lack of follow-up after training
    56. 56. Trainers • Most of us aren’t trained to trainContent • Too much content is coveredEducation • Training viewed as educationMentality • Classroom mentalityDumping • “Data dumping”Follow-Up • Lack of follow-up after training
    57. 57. Trainers • Most of us aren’t trained to trainContent • Too much content is coveredEducation • Training viewed as educationMentality • Classroom mentalityDumping • “Data dumping”Follow-Up • Lack of follow-up after training
    58. 58. What are the takeaway messages?
    59. 59. 3. Pros andcons of each mode
    60. 60. Thanks!Ann Emery, aemery5@gmu.eduNadia Jamil, njamil2@gmu.edu

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