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UCSD 1st year program
UCSD 1st year program
UCSD 1st year program
UCSD 1st year program
UCSD 1st year program
UCSD 1st year program
UCSD 1st year program
UCSD 1st year program
UCSD 1st year program
UCSD 1st year program
UCSD 1st year program
UCSD 1st year program
UCSD 1st year program
UCSD 1st year program
UCSD 1st year program
UCSD 1st year program
UCSD 1st year program
UCSD 1st year program
UCSD 1st year program
UCSD 1st year program
UCSD 1st year program
UCSD 1st year program
UCSD 1st year program
UCSD 1st year program
UCSD 1st year program
UCSD 1st year program
UCSD 1st year program
UCSD 1st year program
UCSD 1st year program
UCSD 1st year program
UCSD 1st year program
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UCSD 1st year program

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  • I’m AZK – I’ve been at the UO for 11 years – I have a passion for instruction that’s grown as I’ve gotten to do more of it. Today I want to talk about 1st year writing programs and my vision for what I think we can make happen here.
  • Next 3 slides are of Balmy Ally in SF – see that each house has a different mural, in different styles and themes and they create this fun, provoactive immersive experience.My management styleCollaborative – I will get your ideas about what you’d like to see happen. And I care a lot about making sure that you’re happy or at least willing to try what we propose. I’m very good at meeting people and talking to them about their ideas. I have made good friends in the departments I work with formally, CS, mathmatician and HPHY folks, as well as others who have intrests that relate to what I do. I’ve worked with English faculty on video games, Geography faculty on technology issues, and more.I’m also flexible I’ll try something and then work with you to make it suit youhttp://www.flickr.com/photos/nicolas_vollmer_photo/9436205958/sizes/l/
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/spine/1863364716/sizes/l/Balmy Ally in SF – the original door to this was damaged and years later an entirely different artist did the bottom to fit in with the rest of the mural – nice collaborationI'm the engine & enthusiasmI want to come up with a plan that you want to try and help you succeed.
  • My management styleInnovator - will allow you to go forward with what works for you & help you modify itI’m very good at coming up with ideas, so I’ll be counting on you to let me know when you want to know more about something and when you want to keep trying. Some examples of innovation:Peer to peer mathletesoutreach to new faculty marketingVideogame collection with circulating consolesModel for working with our 1st year programs is now library wide programhttp://www.flickr.com/photos/kchrist/348287721/sizes/o/
  • Think of each class as a bird sitting in a tree – here we have the great horned owl – some facts here about the GHO
  • Many programs at UCSD – as represented by these trees with the sun gently shining on them, giving them the light they need to grow big and strong.
  • I’m going to look at just 1 – the 1st year writing programhttp://english.unlv.edu/composition/coursesAndhttp://clearinghouse.ucsd.edu
  • The sun shines down on us all:From GWLA student learning outcomes conference in November of 2013 – Patricia Iannuzzi, Dean of Libraries at UNLV, presentationThese UULOs they talk about as if it’s another colleague of theirsFrom 2007 – 2011 – a campus wide retreat until Faculty Senate adoptions in Spring of 2011Talked about selling apple pieI think UCSD is working on something similar, remember that it can be a multi-year process.ARE THESE MEASUREABLE? No. But, if you look up their site, you’ll see that they do a much better job there.http://generaled.unlv.edu/uulo.html
  • My understanding is that after the 1st year programs, UCSD students then complete the rest of their requirements in their majors. But the idea of then trying to get to students later in their careers is something that I very much believe in. You can’t teach them everything they need to know at once and that effective instruction is also usually tied to discipline based classes.
  • I’m going to look at just 1 – the 1st year writing program – with an acknowledgement that there are 6 distinct programs – likely with some strong similarities and unique differencesJust like the branches of a treeBut, all of them want the student to finish the writing instruction as more astute critical thinkers, better writers, and more through researchers. They just seem to have a different emphasis in each college.http://english.unlv.edu/composition/coursesAndhttp://clearinghouse.ucsd.edu – there seem to beHUMANITIES PROGRAM 
REVELLE COLLEGEMUIR COLLEGE WRITING PROGRAM 
JOHN MUIR COLLEGEDIMENSIONS OF CULTURE PROGRAM 
THURGOOD MARSHALL COLLEGEWARREN COLLEGE WRITING PROGRAM 
EARL WARREN COLLEGEMAKING OF THE MODERN WORLD 
ELEANOR ROOSEVELT COLLEGECULTURE, ART, AND TECHNOLOGY 
SIXTH COLLEGE
  • Presented at the GWLA student learning outcomes by Jennifer Fabbi, Erin Rinto, and Nancy Fawley all of UNLV – Curriculum Mapping to integrate and communicate information literacy learning”Here we are using IPE – What do you use? Introduce / Reinforce / Extend or enhance? Others?Important part is that we are going over skills and knowledge at several different levels. I really like Carol Kuhlthau work, emerita from Rutgers, who talks about cycles and layers involved in the Information Search Process from initiation to exploration to collection to presentation (and more)http://www.gwla.org/Committees/slo/event-schedule/pre-event-readingshttps://docs.google.com/file/d/0BxsFBybQgCJec3poWHVqNmM3ck0/edit
  • DIMENSIONS OF CULTURE PROGRAM 
THURGOOD MARSHALL COLLEGE
  • Program – CurrentDiscuss what this grid showsDOC 1 - DIMENSIONS OF CULTURE PROGRAM -THURGOOD MARSHALL COLLEGEDOC 1, "Diversity," focuses on questions of inequality, and is rooted in historical texts rather than abstract theoretical readings. This four-unit course is designed to provide a broad overview of the histories of multiple communities and to explore the origins of social stratification in the United States. Instead of a formal paper assignment in DOC 1, numerous journal entries are geared toward helping students identify and summarize the key arguments of assigned texts, and also develop the elementary but critical reading and writing skills necessary for work at the university level. DOC 2, "Justice," is a six-unit course focusing on social justice and law, and is oriented with reference to political theory and the American experience, as well as court cases. Two formal papers will be assigned in DOC 2, accompanied by intensive instruction and revision. DOC 3, "Imagination," focuses on cultural representations – literature, film, theatre, photography, music, video, etc. – and emphasizes their historical context. We strive to build the students’ analytical skills to interpret these complex and allusive cultural expressions. This six-unit course plays out many of the themes raised in the previous two courses through various artifacts of modern American culture from the post-war period until the present. Two formal papers will be assigned in DOC 3, accompanied by intensive instruction and revision.
  • Program – proposedP= partnership w/ program coordinatorHERE IS ALSO WHERE WORKING WITH LIBRARIANS AND FACULTY IN CONJUCTION WITH EYE TOWARDS INSTRUCTIONAL DESIGN IS CRUCIAL. And it’s part of what makes this job so exciting. With the thinking about what we want the students to know how to do, then we can work on how to get them there.DOC 1 - DIMENSIONS OF CULTURE PROGRAM -THURGOOD MARSHALL COLLEGEDOC 1, "Diversity," focuses on questions of inequality, and is rooted in historical texts rather than abstract theoretical readings. This four-unit course is designed to provide a broad overview of the histories of multiple communities and to explore the origins of social stratification in the United States. Instead of a formal paper assignment in DOC 1, numerous journal entries are geared toward helping students identify and summarize the key arguments of assigned texts, and also develop the elementary but critical reading and writing skills necessary for work at the university level. DOC 2, "Justice," is a six-unit course focusing on social justice and law, and is oriented with reference to political theory and the American experience, as well as court cases. Two formal papers will be assigned in DOC 2, accompanied by intensive instruction and revision. DOC 3, "Imagination," focuses on cultural representations – literature, film, theatre, photography, music, video, etc. – and emphasizes their historical context. We strive to build the students’ analytical skills to interpret these complex and allusive cultural expressions. This six-unit course plays out many of the themes raised in the previous two courses through various artifacts of modern American culture from the post-war period until the present. Two formal papers will be assigned in DOC 3, accompanied by intensive instruction and revision.
  • MAKING OF THE MODERN WORLD 
ELEANOR ROOSEVELT COLLEGE
  • I have a lot of experience with teaching specific classes and I really want the chance to talk to you a bit about them.
  • Need learning outcomes – At the end of the 1st year/session, learners will be able to…MUST BE MEASUREABLE AND ASSESSIBLEhttp://wpacouncil.org/positions/outcomes.htmlhttp://www.cornellcollege.edu/first-year-program/first-year-writing/learning-outcomes.shtml
  • Some ways I can imagine trying to document what we are doing to meet those program wide goals would include a document like this one.Formative and summative assessment as we teachMAKING OF THE MODERN WORLD - ELEANOR ROOSEVELT COLLEGEMMW 22: Exploring the Modern World (Transfer Students Only) (4) MMW 22, the second of two required courses for ERC transfer students, addresses specific themes and topics from the modern world (eighteenth century to the present) and strengthens transfer students’ research and writing skills.
  • Or this one. Again, the importance of working with the folks who are delivering it and with the folks who are designing the pieces can’t be emphasized enough.What do we teach, how do we teach it and it is working the way we intend for it to work?Modified from Oregon State University and Stefanie BuckMAKING OF THE MODERN WORLD - ELEANOR ROOSEVELT COLLEGEMMW 22: Exploring the Modern World (Transfer Students Only) (4) MMW 22, the second of two required courses for ERC transfer students, addresses specific themes and topics from the modern world (eighteenth century to the present) and strengthens transfer students’ research and writing skills.
  • AGAIN the importance and utility of instructional design – we have an idea of what we want them to to know and when, but getting a good design to get them there is crucial
  • http://www.allenginsberg.org/index.php?page=virginia-military-instituteAssess student learning at the course and program levelRemember instruction isn’t staticWe are not just showing students the mechanics of how to step through a byzantine system, but we are actively engaged in Teaching the scholarly method to each studentConcept thresholds – not just how-to but why
  • Objective data – retentionPerceptions of student learningDemonstrations of student learningFormative and summative assessment as we teachThink about using evaluations of rubrics to consider not just “we teach these topics” but focus on finding where students struggle and planning to reach them at those points.Standardized tests – can’t use multiple choice for checking for complex thinking – some of them are good, but are expensive, hard to set up or require lots of trainingIf you’re willing to invest and you’re clear about what they do, interesting tools to explore. Be clear about what you are going to get from it.RUBRICSFrom Patricia at UNLV: SAILS - eliminated higher complex thinking tools - can't do that with multiple choicelibrary instruction instrument - it's good for that, but not for critical thinkingiSkills - mapped to ACRL standards - performance based - expensive - tricky to set up a lab with the client - interesting resultsCAAPknow what your campus is using - find the scoring rubrics and see what it is assessingCLA - hours of training - deemed not scalable - maybe at a program levelAAC&Uvalue rubrics - rubric application - deemed acceptable for student work - VALUE; rails project; individual colleges
  • from Handlesman, J., S. Miller, and C. Pfund. 2007. Scientific Teaching. New York: W.H. Freeman and Co.Prefer models that emphasize the complexity of thought – the threshold concepts are important theoretical framework again hereNot just penalizing them for X number of mistakes
  • http://www.cwsei.ubc.ca/Files/ReadySetReact_3fold.pdfLarge classes = need to design things differentlyThis is where clicker questions work well and where flipped classes – with surveys/quizzes and tutorials to watch outside of class are a wonderful way to reinforce what you are trying to teach. Pre-teaching allows students extra time, and frankly, I can’t see bringing in 200 copies of an article, reading it in class and discussing it. So Libguides can be used for reference afterwardsLarge classes also force you to consider the meaning, and not just a model of the how to do something – I promise from personal experience that it doesn’t workLectures are a way to keep students on task and to transmit information – but some of our content is best presented as hands on practice.
  • Consider the role of the library as student employer as well – Peer to peer student learningActive learningThat’s a system that I helped develop – how do the helpers know who wants help? DowelsI think you have writing centers throughout campus – so they aren’t library employees , but it’s worth considering them strategically and being part of the training they get – either to learn how to do better research or to refer students to librarians – maybe you can tell me more in the q&a period about the student writing/homework help labs on campus
  • Avoid instruction fatigue – we need sustainable instruction, not sucking the life out of youI am now convinced that we need to have some of the instruction done by well done, attractive, and pedigogically sound electronic modulesI know that we can use any number of tools – MOOCs, simple videos, not so simple videos, guide on the side – quizzes, video and tutorials even KS state and their qualtrics tutorial – and more, we should we working to deploy them widely when we can.
  • Gen Schaack – brining it all together
  • http://www.niu.edu/engagedlearning/research/pdfs/Boyer_Report.pdfModel innovations at some of these institutions:Carnegie-Mellon University 
Duke University 
University of Utah 
Stanford University 
University of Iowa 
Syracuse University 
University of Virginia 
University of South Carolina
  • REPEAT THE QUESTION!!!!!!!
  • Transcript

    • 1. First year writing programs A plan for UCSD Libraries
    • 2. Collaborative
    • 3. Enthusiastic
    • 4. Innovative
    • 5. General Education 1st year seminar 2nd year seminar includes: English composition, math, 3 courses in humanities, social sciences and math/science; a multicultural component Milestone Experience Culminating Experience
    • 6. 1. Outcome mapping (for all of UCSD institution or specific college) Introduce /Practice/ Expand At the time of receiving a ____________ degree, students: Outcome 1: i/P/E Inquiry and Critical Thinking. Specifically: a.Identify problems, articulate questions or hypotheses, and determine the need for information b. Access and collect the needed information from appropriate primary and secondary sources…. Outcome 2: Citizenship and Ethics i/P/E Outcome 3: Multicultural/Global Knowledge and awareness I/P/E
    • 7. Revelle Muir Marshall Warren Roosevel t Sixth
    • 8. Program view - Current Course name DOC 1 Instruction method DOC 2 L [empty is ok] DOC 3 L/C/T Outcome 1 Inquiry and Critical Thinking 1.1 Identify need for information I 1.2 Collect needed primary and secondary sources 1.3 Recognize complexity of problems… P/E i/P/E I/P P/E Outcome 2… Ethics T= Tutorial L = Libguide C= classroom I = Introduce P= Practice E=
    • 9. Program view - PROPOSED Course name DOC 1 Instruction method (Systematic increase) DOC 2 DOC 3 T/L L/C/T L/C/T I P P/E I/P P/E P E Outcome 1 Inquiry and Critical Thinking 1.1 Identify need for information 1.2 Collect needed primary and secondary sources 1.3 Recognize complexity of problems… (less repetition) I/P 1.4 …. (depth) T= Tutorial L = Libguide C= classroom X = other methods? I = Introduce P= Practice E=
    • 10. Revelle Muir Marshall Warren Rooseve lt Sixth
    • 11. ATEOT-, LWBAT….
    • 12. Course View Course Number/name: MMW 22 Instructor: Learning Outcome Classroom assessment (informal) Semester/Year: W ’14 Formal assessment (Assignment) Teaching strategy Course: Selecting Database Amazing Course assignment appropriate database Library Race is a formal paper – Librarian will Program/UCSD: Evaluate answers evaluate relevance Identify need for as completed. of resources information student used. In class activity; student pairs complete activities; scaffolding diminishes from 1st to 4th leg. Course: Designing Search Strategies (kw searching) In class activity; students identify important words in research topic; brainstorm synonyms and practice using them in a variety of DBs Program/UCSD: Collected needed information Keyword worksheet on their topic (includes boolean, limits, etc.) 1 minute essay at end of class. From formal paper – librarian will evaluate student ability to describe search strategies as part of of topic proposal.
    • 13. Course View Course Number/name: MMW 22 Instructor: Semester/Year: W ’14 Learning Objective IL Instructional outcome strategy Learning activity Assessment Criteria Distinguish relevant, high quality online sources for a MMW topic. Describe gold standard for criteria Guided worksheet, work in small groups, Librarian and students will share and review websites found in class. Learners will be able to identify a quality source and use them in their research papers. “Cognitive Development ” exercise: 1.critique bad site, 2. develop criteria, 3. find a good site
    • 14. Strategic courses Department/Degree Program: MMW Beginning Level Course – MMW 11 Learning Outcome Performance Indicator Teaching/Assessment Strategy Why this course? Middle Level Course – MMW 14-15 or 21-22 Learning Outcome Performance Indicator Teaching/Assessment Strategy Why this course? End Level Course – class with a research paper in their major? Learning Outcome Performance Indicator Teaching/Assessment Strategy Why this course?
    • 15. Assess student learning
    • 16. Data Objective measures - retention Perceptions of student learning Demonstrations of student learning Rubrics Standardized tests
    • 17. from Handlesman, J., S. Miller, and C. Pfund. 2007. Scientific Teaching. New York: W.H. Freeman and Co.
    • 18. Library as student employer
    • 19. 1 minute essay • I particularly appreciated…. (pick as many as you’d like) ① information on my leadership style ② curriculum mapping ③ trends in instruction (active learning, rubrics, concept thresholds, peer to peer learning, etc.) ④ sustainable instruction • I would have preferred…
    • 20. http://tiny.cc/anniezk anniezk@gmail.com
    • 21. Suggested Readings Angelo, T. (1993). Classroom assessment techniques  a handbook for college teachers. San : Francisco: Jossey-Bass Publishers. Benjes-Small, C. A. K. L. J. (n.d.). TEACHING WEB EVALUATION. . Communications in Information Literacy. 2013, 7(1). Booth, C. (2011). Reflective teaching, effective learning  instructional literacy for library : educators. Chicago: American Library Association. Fabbi, J., Rinto, E., & Fawley, N. (n.d.). Pre-Event Readings - GWLA. Curriculum Mapping to Integrate and Communicate Information Literacy Learning. Retrieved from http://www.gwla.org/Committees/slo/event-schedule/pre-event-readings IS | Analyzing Your Instructional Environment: A Workbook. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/acrl/aboutacrl/directoryofleadership/sections/is/iswebsite/projpubs/aie ReadySetReact_3fold.pdf. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.cwsei.ubc.ca/Files/ReadySetReact_3fold.pdf Scripps-Hoekstra, L. (2013). Eight tips from the trenches: How experience teaching high school informs my approach to information literacy instruction. Coll. res. libr. news, 74(5), 252–253. Retrieved from http://crln.acrl.org/content/74/5/252.full Seldin, P. (2010). The teaching portfolio  a practical guide to improved performance and : promotion tenure decisions. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass. Townsend, L., Brunetti, K., & Hofer, A. (2011). Threshold concepts and information literacy. portal: Libraries and the Academy. Retrieved from http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/pla/summary/v011/11.3.townsend.html

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