Digital Badges at UIC Library
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Digital Badges at UIC Library

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Presentation about digital badges for information literacy at the UIC Library Faculty Research Convocation.

Presentation about digital badges for information literacy at the UIC Library Faculty Research Convocation.

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  • [AP] Who: Annie Armstrong and Annie Pho applied for a grant through the Center for Excellence in Teaching and Learning here at UIC for a pilot project that would incorporate a digital badge system for information literacy. In spring of 2013, we were awarded the grant which we will use to hire a web designer and graphic designer to help us get our website/online off the ground.
  • [AP]What: Digital badges are a way to reward skills that are achieved online. A real life example of this is girl or boy scouts earn badges as they master a skill, they earn a badge which symbolizes an accomplishment. Each digital badge is a representation of a skill, with metadata associated with it. So this image shows the anatomy of what a digital badge really is. It tells you who issued it, what the user did to earn it, the rubric used to grade their work, and a date. Digital badges tap into certain game design mechanics like motivation and reward, so the thinking is that students will be motivated to earn badges and level up.Badges are increasingly prevalent in all levels of education (K-12 and higher ed.) and are used in schools, public institutions such as museums, and in MOOCs and learning management systems. They support learning by allowing their creators to make learning outcomes transparent.
  • Badges are increasingly prevalent in all levels of education (K-12 and higher ed.) and are used in schools, public institutions such as museums, and in MOOCs and learning management systems. They support learning by allowing their creators to make learning outcomes transparent. People can earn badges from various institutions and display their badges on a dashboard such as Mozilla backpack. The thinking is if you did some sort of training and earned a badge, then whoever needs to verify that you completed the training can go to your Backpack to see your badges (with the metadata).
  • [AP]For our pilot program, we have created 4 major levels or outcomes for teaching information literacy online to ENG 161 students. Within each level, we have activities that the students must accomplish before they can “level up” to the next level. Some of these levels are: Developing, Searching, Evaluating, and Incorporating. Examples of quests, which are the tasks associated with each major level, are watching the doing research tutorial, creating a concept map of keywords associated with the research topic, take a picture of your study space.As students complete these tasks, we will be reviewing their answers as they go along. Some tasks can be automatically graded, like a quiz, others will require review from us, like if the student writes a reflection on a website.
  • [AA]Where: There are a few sections of ENG 161 which are taught in a blended learning environment. They can’t always make it into the library so we want to pair up with these sections, and work the the instructor to assign these badges throughout the semester, instead of in a one-shot session where students might not have a need to find library materials just yet, and then forget. The online nature of these badge activities allows for flexibility in scheduling, so the students will learn what they need, when they need it. Using badges allows educators to facilitate active learning outside of the classroom, such as with the “flipped classroom model.”When: The timeline for this was supposed to be next spring, but will instead be piloted next fall. We need some time for usability testing and web development.
  • [AA]Why/Research Questions: We want to see if we can change the 1-shot model into a scaffolded approach to information literacy. We want to see how the students interact with the badge activities online, and if this is a viable model for instruction for the future. We can’t always make it into every class, so this can be an alternative. Not only will badges allow us to support English 161 curriculum, but if the pilot is successful, we can expand badges to other areas in the curriculum and support information literacy outcomes at higher levels.What variances (if any) are there in student performance when teaching in-person vs. through a badge system: both in completing individual research exercises and in overall performance in research paper (as defined by our rubrics)

Digital Badges at UIC Library Presentation Transcript

  • 1. DIGITAL BADGES FOR INFORMATION LITERACY ANNIE ARMSTRONG & ANNIE PHO FACULTY CONVOCATION 2013
  • 2. LEVEL UP: ENGLISH 161 Developing Searching and Finding Evaluating Incorporating
  • 3. TIMELINE Fall 2013 build badge system Winter/Spring 2014 IRB application for usability and pilot program Spring 2014 usability testing Fall 2014 pilot program/research study
  • 4. RESEARCH QUESTIONS Can research skills be effectively taught through a badge system? How does game-based learning enhance student learning? Does student attainment of research skills vary when taught through a badge system vs. a traditional setting?