AGQTP Project
» A collaborative creative writing
experience for Year 8 students
»
»
»
»
»
»
»

A cluster of 4 inner city schools
32 stud...
» To enhance the writing process through collaboration with
peers.
» To improve understanding of narrative elements such a...
» 4 students per group
» Stimulus and story crafting provided by guest
author and TLs
» Group work and ICT skills enhanced...
» Students collaborate on elements of story
» 4 characters explore the same scenario from
their point of view
» Each stude...
Individual
stories with
peer feedback

Shared space for
discussion,
development and
clarification of
story ideas for
each ...
» Provided a clear structure on how and where to
provide peer feedback
» Provided a platform for support materials and
wor...
» Survey results - pre and post workshop
comparison
» Pre workshop survey (32 responses)
» Post workshop survey (23 respon...
» Improvement made in attitude towards
benefits of group work
Pre workshop survey

Post workshop survey

47%

57%

44%

30...
» Decrease in challenges
What challenges (if any) did you
have with working in a group?
17

Linking stories and differing ...
» Positive reflection on peer editing

16%

17%
37%

52%
26%

9%
34%
3%

4%
» Increase in peer status as credible editor

31%

13%

47%

52%

3%
9%
6%
3%

4%
0%
17%
» Students see the benefits for learning

35%

13%

48%

35%

17%

35%
13%
4%
» More input needed on publishing online

9%
25%
12%

0%
22%
31%

19%
6%
29%

26%
22%
Post Workshop Survey

» A positive experience

35%
61%
» Professional end product
» Decide to publish as ibook online or not
» Some difficulties with different operating
systems...
Online collaborative writing workshop Term 1
My writing workshop Term 3
Group collaborates on common plot
Percy Jackson – ...
“… greater attention to an outcome will improve performance
on any measure”
http://www.ascd.org/publications/books/107018/...
Kids Speak Out on Student Engagement
APRIL 26, 2012 http://www.edutopia.org/blog/student-engagement-stories-heather-wolper...
1. Eliza breaks into a haunted house at night to
retrieve a ball, and finds this very frightening.
2. Clarisse creates an ...
Salty Revenge Madeleine End Term 3
The huge monster had me pinned to the ground. Horrifying seaweed essence slowly
dripped...
Q6 Which method of learning about writing did you find more enjoyable.
Please give reasons.
I enjoyed collaborative writin...
Q8 What improvements would you suggest for the collaborative
wiki writing activity?
I would suggest smaller groups…it was ...
WHAT NEXT?
GENDER
…mixed gender groups produce less stereotypical writing. For example, it was found that boys are
more li...
» ibooks
» Student surveys - survey monkey
» Group work and collaboration skills taught
explicitly; Listening and conflict...
»
»

»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»
»

»
»

Do more conflict resolution and active listening skills before workshop.
Discuss importance o...
Collaborative Writing AGQTP 2013
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Collaborative Writing AGQTP 2013

  1. 1. AGQTP Project
  2. 2. » A collaborative creative writing experience for Year 8 students » » » » » » » A cluster of 4 inner city schools 32 students in total 1 guest author Introductory and closing evenings 2 full writing days Editing and publishing afternoons Books published in ibook author
  3. 3. » To enhance the writing process through collaboration with peers. » To improve understanding of narrative elements such as character point of view and plot structures. » To improve editing skills and the ability to provide peer feedback. » To provide students with an opportunity to become publishers of material in an authentic online context for a variety of audiences. » To increase effective group participation skills.
  4. 4. » 4 students per group » Stimulus and story crafting provided by guest author and TLs » Group work and ICT skills enhanced by teachers » Feedback given by students and some guidance by teachers
  5. 5. » Students collaborate on elements of story » 4 characters explore the same scenario from their point of view » Each student writes their own story based on the common scenario » Shared wiki – information, group discussion writing, feedback, editing
  6. 6. Individual stories with peer feedback Shared space for discussion, development and clarification of story ideas for each group
  7. 7. » Provided a clear structure on how and where to provide peer feedback » Provided a platform for support materials and workshop notes » Able to be continually modified by teachers and students » Able to post engaging multimedia » Students able to be active online participants » Teachers notified of editing progress » Wiki most beneficial support to get the most out of the group work – 60% respondents
  8. 8. » Survey results - pre and post workshop comparison » Pre workshop survey (32 responses) » Post workshop survey (23 responses) » Overall - positive feedback from students ˃ Group work ˃ Challenges ˃ Peer editing and feedback ˃ Benefits for learning ˃ Digital Citizenship
  9. 9. » Improvement made in attitude towards benefits of group work Pre workshop survey Post workshop survey 47% 57% 44% 30% 9% 13%
  10. 10. » Decrease in challenges What challenges (if any) did you have with working in a group? 17 Linking stories and differing ideas 9 11 18 21 6 1 None 5 Uneven contributions 2 Personality Clash 1 Listening 1 Confidence 1 Inflexibility 1
  11. 11. » Positive reflection on peer editing 16% 17% 37% 52% 26% 9% 34% 3% 4%
  12. 12. » Increase in peer status as credible editor 31% 13% 47% 52% 3% 9% 6% 3% 4% 0% 17%
  13. 13. » Students see the benefits for learning 35% 13% 48% 35% 17% 35% 13% 4%
  14. 14. » More input needed on publishing online 9% 25% 12% 0% 22% 31% 19% 6% 29% 26% 22%
  15. 15. Post Workshop Survey » A positive experience 35% 61%
  16. 16. » Professional end product » Decide to publish as ibook online or not » Some difficulties with different operating systems » Some students unfamiliar with Mac » Save ibooks in one designated location » Allocate group leader to combine books » Instruct about copyright permissions » Not edited by teachers
  17. 17. Online collaborative writing workshop Term 1 My writing workshop Term 3 Group collaborates on common plot Percy Jackson – missing chapter Mrs Weaver’s Nine Writing Steps – Each group member writes short story from their own character’s point of view on wiki apply to practice story, then write a new short story from Brian Falkner’s Writing Workshop different character’s point of view on G Drive Step 1: What is story? Step 2: Plot development Step 1: Plan for Success Step 2: Characters Step 3: Sizzling Starts Step 4: Tightening Tension Step 5: Dynamic Dialogue Step 6: Show, Don't Tell Step 3: Character - Make them real, Make us care, Make us laugh, Save the cat Step 4: Covenant of the arc: characters are not the same at the end of the story as at the start. Step 5: The writing triangle: Doing stuff, description, Dialogue Step 7: Ban the Boring Bits Step 6: “The power of “what would be better than this?” Step 8: Exciting Endings Step 7: Writing with emotion Step 9: Review, rewriting, reflection Step 8: Peer editing Step 9: ibook making
  18. 18. “… greater attention to an outcome will improve performance on any measure” http://www.ascd.org/publications/books/107018/chapters/What-Isthe-Teacher's-Job-When-Teaching%C2%A2.aspx Almost everything works. Ninety percent of all effect sizes in education are positive… setting the bar at zero is absurd. http://pragmaticreform.wordpress.com/2013/03/02/hattie/ “Our debates are too concentrated on how we teach, whereas all the visible learning work tells me it needs to be about the impact of how we teach. Observe the impact. Wow, is that powerful.” http://www.ifl.ac.uk/publications/intuition/intuition-issue11/interview?SQ_DESIGN_NAME=print_friendly&
  19. 19. Kids Speak Out on Student Engagement APRIL 26, 2012 http://www.edutopia.org/blog/student-engagement-stories-heather-wolpertgawron?utm_source=twitter&utm_medium=cpc&utm_campaign=blog-kids-speak-out-question "What engages students?" 220 eighth graders. Responses seemed to fall under 10 categories. 1. Working with their peers 2. Working with technology 3. Connecting the real world to the work we do/project-based learning 4. Clearly love what you do 5. Get me out of my seat! 6. Bring in visuals 7. Student choice 8. Understand your clients -- the kids "Encourage students to voice their opinions as you may never know what you can learn from your "Teachers should know that within every class they teach, the students are all different.“ 9. Mix it up! "I don't like doing only one constant activity...a variety will keep me engaged in the topic. "Also, you can't go wrong with some comedy. Everyone loves a laugh...another thing that engages me would be class or group games. In Language Arts I've played a game of "dodge ball. We throw words at each other, one at a time." 10. Be human
  20. 20. 1. Eliza breaks into a haunted house at night to retrieve a ball, and finds this very frightening. 2. Clarisse creates an illusory sea monster that attacks Percy, so Percy takes revenge by making Clarisse’s cabin wet and smelly. 3. In a future world, Technologians run out of coal and attack the Naturalisers who grow their own food and use solar power. Iggy, the son of the Technologian leader is saved by his enemy, the Naturalizers. He stops his father and makes Technologians realise they have to live with nature.
  21. 21. Salty Revenge Madeleine End Term 3 The huge monster had me pinned to the ground. Horrifying seaweed essence slowly dripped onto the ground beside me. The gigantic mass of seaweed and coral raised its head and roared, shattering my eardrums. Ribbons of seaweed hung from its humanoid figure like tassels. Its spectral yellow eyes were hidden from view, deep underneath the vulgar seaweed tangle. A ring of dead coral decorated its face, like a crown. In my peripheral vision I could see campers rushing out of their cabins, unsure of what to do. I saw someone throw a spear at the monster’s back, but it bounced off harmlessly, as if it were a twig. I tried to stretch my hand out towards my sword that lay on the ground beside me. My fingertips were just touching the cool, unforgiving blade. Term 1 I sat in front of our Holograph Projector, watching some Technologian freak with shiny waxed legs and unnaturally white hair talk about different shades of eyeliner. I had my eyes trained on her surgically puffed lips with disgust. I unconsciously traced my fingernails around the little buttons around the remote, pretending I was reading Braille. Today I felt so lazy. It was the hottest day this summer and some of our solar panels broke, so we have no air-conditioning. I stared longingly at the picture of Antarctica that my sister, Zeeta, drew. How could such a place ever have existed? Apparently, it used to be so cold, that there was ice there! Now of course, it has melted.
  22. 22. Q6 Which method of learning about writing did you find more enjoyable. Please give reasons. I enjoyed collaborative writing more because we had the opportunity to read each others' stories and provide feedback as well as receive feedback.. Wiki writing was very enjoyable, and I would recommend it to anyone. It was a new, enjoyable experience that I have valued. However, for me, I prefer writing by myself as I am in control of the story, and not dependant on others as much. Q7 Which method of learning about writing did you find improved your story writing more. Please give reasons. I feel as if the group work improved my story the most because I learnt about other people's writing styles and used their idea to improve my own story. I believe the wiki writing was a unique experience where other students gave me improvements for my story. I liked this, as it was from students my age.
  23. 23. Q8 What improvements would you suggest for the collaborative wiki writing activity? I would suggest smaller groups…it was very hard to settle on a basic story plot. More time to talk with the group. Q9 What improvements would you suggest for the classroom teacher directed writing workshop? I have no suggestions - the lessons given my the teachers were very informative and helpful. In the last two years I have attended writing workshops, and have found teachers focusing on writing activities too much. I prefer looking over the writing activities as I write, rather than go through them.
  24. 24. WHAT NEXT? GENDER …mixed gender groups produce less stereotypical writing. For example, it was found that boys are more likely to present females as victims and use a lot of violence, when writing on their own. Girls were found to create more independent characters with stronger voices, and less feminised stories when writing in mixed groups. Handbook of Writing Research by Charles A. MacArthur, Steve Graham, Jill Fitzgerald Guilford Press, 2006 CREATIVITY "compositions written by pairs were more advanced than individually written ones, and the benefits of collaboration carried over into subsequent individual creative writing (Hartup, 1996)." Vass et al found that the benefits of collaborative creative writing are dependent on the quality of collaboration, as well as other contextual factors, which is why teachers need to explicitly teach collaborative skills and set up a task suited to collaboration. Vass, Eva; Littleton, Karen; Miell, Dorothy and Jones, Ann (2008). The discourse of collaborative creative writing: Peer collaboration as a context for mutual inspiration. Thinking Skills and Creativity, 3(3), pp. 192– 202. http://oro.open.ac.uk/12788/2/ EMOTION and GROUPS “necessity to consider the emotional aspects of cognition. Coates 1996, used the term collaborative floor to describe the period of mutual focus and intense sharing, where the overlaps and interruptions are neither chaotic nor off-putting. This fuzzy, organic, non-linear type of collective thinking is called ‘ripple thinking’ (Vass 2007b). "When engaged in ripple thinking, ideas build on each other and get more and more rich and complex, expanding in all directions like ripples of water." Vass states productive talk in creative contexts may not conform to tidy or linear discourse patterns. Classroom practices need to accommodate such unpredictability and unboundedness. Vass, Eva; Littleton, Karen; Miell, Dorothy and Jones, Ann (2008). The discourse of collaborative creative writing: Peer collaboration as a context for mutual inspiration. Thinking Skills and Creativity, 3(3), pp. 192–202. http://oro.open.ac.uk/12788/2/ OTHER APPLICATIONS _ YEAR 10 EXTENTION CLASS USING SHARED ONENOTE NON EXTENSION CLASS
  25. 25. » ibooks » Student surveys - survey monkey » Group work and collaboration skills taught explicitly; Listening and conflict resolution training and structures added » No story cards » Peer feedback - given headings and allocated person to edit » Explicit discussion of aspects of collaborative writing eg. plagiarism
  26. 26. » » » » » » » » » » » » » Do more conflict resolution and active listening skills before workshop. Discuss importance of character roles - to overcome student conflict over being the hero or the villain. The importance of hero, villain and supporting characters could be explored. The winning group used a jigsaw approach rather than parallel stories, so alternative plot structures could be further developed. More reliance on peer feedback, and reduce teacher feedback further. There could be 2 sessions of peer editing, one by a group member, then another at each school. Gain more understanding of gender differences and writing. Arrange logins beforehand - problem with emails at some schools - check before event. Consider wikispaces - can be used with Apple and Windows devices - now has comment tool. Improve technology barriers; either find and use alternative tools for collaborative publishing or address login and format issues with ibooks. Need more time for publishing ibooks. Develop student input to online publishing – leadership role in groups; explicit teaching of digital citizenship. Author input – Student activities more conservative and texts mentioned more age appropriate, author speak for less time on night. Welcome evening – provide clear aims and breakdown of sessions. Areas for further consideration: compare stories 2011 to 2013 to see if there has been any improvement in stories due to the enhancements to the process.

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