+
SHINE A LIGHT
This project intends to shine a light on the social/emotional issues that impact students with
disabilitie...
+
Initial Quick Write
Purpose:To gage the learning and monitor the effectiveness of the
PDs and the case study activities....
+
Statement of Confidentiality
Although this project will enable me to explore the social
emotional issues that children w...
+
Workshop Schedule and Agenda
 Jan. 21, 2014-Looking at the Roots of Special Education
(Special Education Overview and P...
+
The Brain (Let’s review)
 5 regions of the Central Core
 3 regions of the Limbic System
 5 lobes of the Cerebral Cort...
+
Agenda
 Watch a video to connect the importance of understanding
how the brain works and working through trauma
 What ...
+
A Short Video for Thought
http://youtu.be/zLp-edwiGUU
Brain
Power:
From
Neurons
to Networks
+
What is child Traumatic Stress?
 Child traumatic stress is when children and adolescents are
exposed to traumatic event...
+
How do Children Respond to
Traumatic Stress?
 Depending on their age, children respond to traumatic stress
in different...
+
Signs and Signals of a Stress Reaction
can be Organized into 4 Categories
Physical
Cognitive
Emotional
Behavioral
+
Common Physical Stress Reactions
(List signs your student displays.)
Fatigue Vomiting
Nausea Grinding of teeth
Muscle tr...
+
Common Cognitive Stress Reactions
(List signs your student displays.)
Blaming Poor problems solving
Confusion Poor abstr...
+
Common Emotional Stress Reactions
(List signs your student displays.)
Anxiety Loss of emotional control
Guilt Depression...
+
Common Behavioral Stress Reactions
(List signs your student displays.)
Change in activity Inability to rest
Change in sp...
+
Working to Stop the Cycle of
Traumatic Stress
 While some children “bounce back” after adversity, traumatic
experiences...
+
Effective Ways to Treat Child
Traumatic Stress
 Education about the impact of trauma.
 Helping children and their pare...
+
Effective Ways to Treat Child
Traumatic Stress (cont.)
 Validate their emotions which will help to connect with them
on...
+
The Case Study
 Exploring the cum
 Student interviews (will be conducted by Anne-Marie,
Ms.Temores, and Mr.Sanchez)
 ...
+
The Social-Emotional Case Study
Prompts
 What are the student’s family strengths and support systems?
 What is the sit...
+
The Social-Emotional Case Study
Prompts (cont.)
 How much screen time does your student have per day?
 How much exerci...
+
The Social-Emotional Case Study
Prompts (cont.)
 Does your student ever get to interact with nature?
 How much time do...
+
The Social-Emotional Case Study
Prompts (cont.)
 What is your student’s relationship with his/her parents?
 Does your ...
+
Exploring the Cumulative File
Attendance record
 Have there been excessive absences? When did these
occur?
Teacher co...
+
Exploring the Cumulative File
(cont.)
Enrollment documents
 Does student have siblings? What were their ages at
time o...
+
Exploring the Cumulative (cont.)
Report cards
 Grades, teacher comments, do parents typically attend
conferences?
 Ar...
+
Closing Thoughts
 By looking deeper at the social emotional issues that may be
impacting our students with disabilities...
+
References
 Bryan,T., Burstein, K., & Ergul, C. (2004).The social-emotional
side of learning disabilities: A science-ba...
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Teresa ppt pd 3.25.14 desktop

  1. 1. + SHINE A LIGHT This project intends to shine a light on the social/emotional issues that impact students with disabilities in and outside of the classroom.The project will help to build cultural awareness as it relates to the social and emotional issues that impact students with disabilities. By building awareness among teachers,the project intends to develop a more welcoming school community for students with disabilities and their families.
  2. 2. + Initial Quick Write Purpose:To gage the learning and monitor the effectiveness of the PDs and the case study activities. You will have 5 minutes to write about why you selected the student you chose for your case study, discuss your immediate concerns regarding the student, talk about what you hope to learn, and briefly describe what you believe are some of the student’s social emotional challenges. *When the timer begins please start writing (please try to write for the duration of the time). *Try to refrain from discussion until after the quick write is over, at which time you will have 3 minutes to share your thoughts with a table partner.
  3. 3. + Statement of Confidentiality Although this project will enable me to explore the social emotional issues that children with disabilities face, in order to respect the privacy of my student and his/her family, I will make every effort to refrain from discussing my student by name. Additionally, at no time will I be discussing my social emotional findings with other students or parents of other students. ________________________ Teacher name ________________________ Teacher signature
  4. 4. + Workshop Schedule and Agenda  Jan. 21, 2014-Looking at the Roots of Special Education (Special Education Overview and Project Opening)  Feb. 18, 2014-Trauma and the Brain; Select student for case study  March 25, 2014-Signs, Signals, and Reactions of Trauma; Quick write and statement of confidentiality; Explore the cum; Explorations with case study  April 22, 2014-Psychological 1st Aid/Teacher Self-Care; Case study discussions; Student interview results; Final quick write
  5. 5. + The Brain (Let’s review)  5 regions of the Central Core  3 regions of the Limbic System  5 lobes of the Cerebral Cortex  Trauma affects all parts of the brain  Neuroplasticity allows for recalibration  As teachers, we can help a child overcome trauma
  6. 6. + Agenda  Watch a video to connect the importance of understanding how the brain works and working through trauma  What is child traumatic stress?  Common signs and signals of a stress reaction  Working to stop the cycle of traumatic stress  Effective ways to treat child traumatic stress
  7. 7. + A Short Video for Thought http://youtu.be/zLp-edwiGUU Brain Power: From Neurons to Networks
  8. 8. + What is child Traumatic Stress?  Child traumatic stress is when children and adolescents are exposed to traumatic events or traumatic situations, and when this exposure overwhelms their ability to cope.  When children have been exposed to situations when they feared for their lives, believed they could have been injured, witnessed violence, or tragically lost a loved one, they may show signs of traumatic stress.  The impact on any given child depends partly on the objective danger, partly on his or her subjective reaction to the events, and partly on his or her age and developmental level.
  9. 9. + How do Children Respond to Traumatic Stress?  Depending on their age, children respond to traumatic stress in different ways. Many children show signs of intense distress.  Even though the event may be over, one may now be experiencing or may experience later, some strong emotional or physical reactions.  It is very common (in fact quite normal) for people to experience emotional aftershocks or flashbacks when they have passed through a horrible event.
  10. 10. + Signs and Signals of a Stress Reaction can be Organized into 4 Categories Physical Cognitive Emotional Behavioral
  11. 11. + Common Physical Stress Reactions (List signs your student displays.) Fatigue Vomiting Nausea Grinding of teeth Muscle tremors Weakness Twitches Dizziness Chest pain Profuse sweating Difficulty breathing Chills Elevated Blood Pressure Shock symptoms Thirst Fainting Headaches Increased heart rate Visual difficulties
  12. 12. + Common Cognitive Stress Reactions (List signs your student displays.) Blaming Poor problems solving Confusion Poor abstract thinking Poor Attention Loss of time, place or person orientation Poor decisions Disturbed thinking Heightened or lowered alertness Nightmares Poor concentration Intrusive images Memory problems Increased or decreased awareness of surroundings Hyper vigilance Difficulty identifying familiar objects or people
  13. 13. + Common Emotional Stress Reactions (List signs your student displays.) Anxiety Loss of emotional control Guilt Depression Grief Inappropriate emotional response Denial Apprehension Severe pain (rare) Feeling overwhelmed Emotional shock Intense anger Fear Irritability Uncertainty Agitation
  14. 14. + Common Behavioral Stress Reactions (List signs your student displays.) Change in activity Inability to rest Change in speech patterns Antisocial acts Withdrawal Nonspecific bodily complaints Emotional outbursts Hyper alert to environment Suspiciousness Startle reflex intensified Change in usual communications Pacing Loss or increase of appetite Erratic movements Alcohol consumption Change in sexual functioning
  15. 15. + Working to Stop the Cycle of Traumatic Stress  While some children “bounce back” after adversity, traumatic experiences can result in a significant disruption of child or adolescent development and have profound long-term consequences.  Repeated exposure to traumatic events can affect the child’s brain and nervous system and increase the risk of low academic performance, engagement in high risk behaviors, and difficulties in peer and family relationships.  Traumatic stress can cause increased use of health and mental health services and increased involvement with the child welfare and juvenile justice systems.  Adult survivors of traumatic events may have difficulty in establishing fulfilling relationships, holding steady jobs, and becoming productive members of our society. Fortunately, there are effective treatments for child traumatic stress.
  16. 16. + Effective Ways to Treat Child Traumatic Stress  Education about the impact of trauma.  Helping children and their parents establish or re-establish a sense of safety.  Teach students skills to cope better with distress and to learn social problem solving skills.  Give students an opportunity to talk about the traumatic experiences in a safe, accepting environment.  Learn to notice and name the child’s experiences.
  17. 17. + Effective Ways to Treat Child Traumatic Stress (cont.)  Validate their emotions which will help to connect with them on a personal level.  Tune in and understand the message the student is really sending through their behavior.  We will review above further at the next PD: Psychological First Aid.
  18. 18. + The Case Study  Exploring the cum  Student interviews (will be conducted by Anne-Marie, Ms.Temores, and Mr.Sanchez)  Prompts You will have the first 20 minutes during your grade level rotations to explore the cum and answer the prompts (may require making phone calls or speaking with student). Try to briefly answer as many of the questions as possible over the next month (by April 22nd).
  19. 19. + The Social-Emotional Case Study Prompts  What are the student’s family strengths and support systems?  What is the situation like at home? Are there any stressors?  Is there a history of any traumatic experience?  Who does the child live with?  Is your student able to problem solve?  Does the child have adequate supervision after-school?  How many hours is he/she alone per day?  Does the student have medical needs met (dental, eye, physical)?
  20. 20. + The Social-Emotional Case Study Prompts (cont.)  How much screen time does your student have per day?  How much exercise does your student get per day?  What does your student find humorous?  Does your student have access to healthy food? Does he/she bring a snack? What does he/she bring?  Is your student impacted by poverty? How do you know?  Does your student get adequate sleep (no less than 9 hours per night)?  What were the first 3 years of your student’s life like?
  21. 21. + The Social-Emotional Case Study Prompts (cont.)  Does your student ever get to interact with nature?  How much time does your child spend reading in class per day?  How much time does your child spend reading outside of class per day?  Is homework a positive experience or is it a negative and stressful experience for the child and the family?  Does your student ever have opportunities to leave the neighborhood?  How does your student interact with other students in the classroom and on the yard?  Has your student’s family had problems with law enforcement?
  22. 22. + The Social-Emotional Case Study Prompts (cont.)  What is your student’s relationship with his/her parents?  Does your student have siblings? What is his/her relationship with the siblings?  Does your student participate in outside curricular activities?  Over the course of a week, what is your student’s general mood?  Has your student ever been hospitalized? Explain.  Does your student have any ongoing health concerns (physical or mental)?  Are there any other questions that you think when answered would help to create a bigger picture of the social emotional issues impacting your student?
  23. 23. + Exploring the Cumulative File Attendance record  Have there been excessive absences? When did these occur? Teacher comments  Are there any behavior/attention related patterns?  Are there any change in patterns? Previous schools  Has student changed schools or classrooms? Birth certificate  Who was present at the birth?  Where was the child born?
  24. 24. + Exploring the Cumulative File (cont.) Enrollment documents  Does student have siblings? What were their ages at time of enrollment? What are their ages now?  Who are the adults listed on the enrollment form? IEP and SST documents  Review all IEP and SST forms.  Look for information related to the student’s social emotional learning and development  What types of interventions and services has the student received?
  25. 25. + Exploring the Cumulative (cont.) Report cards  Grades, teacher comments, do parents typically attend conferences?  Are there any patterns? Do you see any change in patterns?
  26. 26. + Closing Thoughts  By looking deeper at the social emotional issues that may be impacting our students with disabilities and using what we have learned about brain function and trauma we can use our intent to start addressing each student’s social emotional learning, which as research shows, has a direct impact on academic learning.  As the video suggests, we will work on “paying attention to paying attention.” By peering through the lens of our case study students we can ask ourselves,“What does life and learning look and feel like through the eyes of our students?”
  27. 27. + References  Bryan,T., Burstein, K., & Ergul, C. (2004).The social-emotional side of learning disabilities: A science-based presentation of the state of the art. Learning Disability Quarterly, 45-51.  Durlak, J. A.,Weissberg, R. P., Dymnicki, A. B.,Taylor, R. D., & Schellinger, K. B. (2011).The impact of enhancing students’ social and emotional learning: A meta‐analysis of school‐based universal interventions. Child development, 82(1), 405-432.  Zins, J. E., & Elias, M. J. (2007). Social and emotional learning: Promoting the development of all students. Journal of Educational and Psychological Consultation, 17(2-3), 233-255.

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