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  • So, what do we mean when we talk about the Creative Economy? This is from research done by Jerry Hembd, an economist at UW Superior and a former member of the Wisconsin Arts Board.
  • “ The Creative Economy, ” Doug Henton and Kim Walesh, Grantmakers in the Arts Reader, Vol. 13, No. 2, Summer 2002.
  • This is how Americans for the Arts defines the creative industries. These are the kinds of organizations and businesses we want to encourage in Wisconsin. AFTA has done research on the creative industries using data from Dun and Bradstreet (DUNS).
  • This is what AFTA’s research looks like when displayed on a map. Two caveats: This is probably an under-representation of the creative industries in Wisconsin, because many nonprofits don’t have DUNS numbers (which Arts Wisconsin is encouraging). And, just because there are no dots doesn’t mean that there’s no arts activity – there’s plenty of activity around the state.
  • From BusinessWeek Magazine, September 6, 2004 by John Branch, San Antonio Express News/North America Syndicate
  • Financial Incentives - lower than market interest rates; loan-to-value ratios up to 100%; discounts on all closing costs; a full array of deposit products and services at no charge to relocating artists. Business Incentives - free lots for new construction; free web sites and other joint marketing programs and promotional options; preservation tax incentives; City of Paducah and State of Kentucky Enterprise Zone incentives; health insurance packages through the Kentucky Arts Council for individuals and businesses. Cultural Incentives - National Quilt Museum attracts 74,000 visitors per year to Paducah. The National Quilt Museum's Annual Show attracts 30,000 quilters nationally and internationally, with a statewide impact of $17,473,816 annually. Additional cultural incentives include: Paducah Film Society; Yeiser Art Center; Market House Theatre; Four Rivers Center for the Performing Arts (construction to start in summer of 2001); Paducah Symphony Orchestra; Paducah Community College Focus Series; Festival of Murals; Paducah Summer Festival; Community Concert Series
  • Financial Incentives - lower than market interest rates; loan-to-value ratios up to 100%; discounts on all closing costs; a full array of deposit products and services at no charge to relocating artists. Business Incentives - free lots for new construction; free web sites and other joint marketing programs and promotional options; preservation tax incentives; City of Paducah and State of Kentucky Enterprise Zone incentives; health insurance packages through the Kentucky Arts Council for individuals and businesses. Cultural Incentives - National Quilt Museum attracts 74,000 visitors per year to Paducah. The National Quilt Museum's Annual Show attracts 30,000 quilters nationally and internationally, with a statewide impact of $17,473,816 annually. Additional cultural incentives include: Paducah Film Society; Yeiser Art Center; Market House Theatre; Four Rivers Center for the Performing Arts (construction to start in summer of 2001); Paducah Symphony Orchestra; Paducah Community College Focus Series; Festival of Murals; Paducah Summer Festival; Community Concert Series
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 Creative economy downtown webinar Creative economy downtown webinar Presentation Transcript

  • Presented by Anne Katz, Executive Director Arts Wisconsin www.artswisconsin.org The Creative EconomyThe Creative Economy andand How Wisconsin’sHow Wisconsin’s Downtowns BenefitDowntowns Benefit
  •  Founded in 1992, incorporated in 1994  Mission: Wisconsin’s voice for the arts  Vision: Everyone, everywhere in Wisconsin should have the opportunity to participate in and benefit from the arts.  Position: a catalyst at the intersection of the arts, culture, creativity and innovation to build and sustain a powerful movement that strengthens, connects and sustains economic vitality, education for the 21st century world and workforce, engaged residents, and healthy vibrant communities.  Purpose: Community cultural development, advocacy, and service, to keep Wisconsin growing and thriving artistically and creatively  Members and supporters: artists, performers, for-profit and non-profit corporations and businesses, economic development organizations, local and state government - everyone who cares about Wisconsin’s future. About Arts WisconsinAbout Arts Wisconsin
  • ““Creativity is not new and neitherCreativity is not new and neither is economics, but what is new isis economics, but what is new is the nature and extent of thethe nature and extent of the relationship between them, andrelationship between them, and how they combine to createhow they combine to create extraordinary value and wealth.”extraordinary value and wealth.” John Howkins, The Creative Economy, 2001
  • ““One of the major impediments toOne of the major impediments to a more creative environmenta more creative environment is the notion that creativity is notis the notion that creativity is not a serious enough activitya serious enough activity for grown ups.”for grown ups.” Rance Crain AdAge.com
  • The economy, past:The economy, past: Booming manufacturing economy post WWII-2008  Suburbanization  Growth at all costs  WalMart
  • The economy, now and future:The economy, now and future: Small business/self-employed Creativity, innovation, imagination Entrepreneurship Local, authentic and unique The US economy reinvents itself every sixty years. We are in a new economic era.
  • Creative industries Creative workforce Creative communities, regions, states, countries …the intersection of the three is the Creative Economy. What is the Creative Economy?What is the Creative Economy?
  • A vibrant ecosystem in which artists, creative entrepreneurs, creative for-profit and non- profit businesses produce impact, benefits, value, and power by providing goods, services and entertainment that enhance the economy, generate jobs, income, tax revenue, and support and sustain a community where people want to live, work, learn and play.
  • Hallmarks of the creative economyHallmarks of the creative economy •Creativity is the source of economic wealth and the quality most needed for success. •People are the key economic asset. •Every person is creative in some way. •Place has replaced the corporation as the fundamental business building block.
  • Creativity and innovation have always beenCreativity and innovation have always been important, but because of technologicalimportant, but because of technological advances, speed of communications, growthadvances, speed of communications, growth of information, and the rapid changes of theof information, and the rapid changes of the last decades, the need for creativity islast decades, the need for creativity is fundamental to devising new products,fundamental to devising new products, services, technologies, business models, andservices, technologies, business models, and ways of earning a living.ways of earning a living. Shira White, Researcher
  • What if imagination was reality andWhat if imagination was reality and Scribbles became solutions andScribbles became solutions and World class scientists could play likeWorld class scientists could play like kids?kids? Then you would have some of theThen you would have some of the coolest products ever!coolest products ever! General Electric’s Recruitment Web Site
  • Creative IndustriesCreative Industries  Museums and Collections o Museums o Zoos/Botanical Gardens o Historical Sites o Planetariums  Design and Publishing o Architecture o Design o Publishing o Advertising  Visual Arts & Photography o Crafts o Visual Arts o Photography o Supplies and Services • Performing Arts o Music o Theater o Dance o Opera o Services and Facilities o Performers • Film, Radio and TV o Motion Pictures o Television o Radio • Arts Schools & Services o Arts Councils o School/Instruction o Agents
  • 12,953 arts-related businesses in Wisconsin, employing 49,526 people
  • Creative economy is now. Creativity is essential to Wisconsin industries and communities of all sizes. Wisconsin’s creative economy assets are significant. Creative economy development is happening in Wisconsin’s downtowns and communities. Wisconsin’s statewide creative economy “strategy” is currently uncoordinated and investment is minimal. Other states and countries are intentionally and strategically pursuing creative economy development. Arts and creativity in education are essential to growing Wisconsin’s creative economy. Summing upSumming up
  • Ralph Waldo Emerson (1802-1882) ““A creative economyA creative economy is the fuel of magnificence.”is the fuel of magnificence.”
  • Contact InformationContact Information Anne Katz Executive Director Arts Wisconsin PO Box 1054 Madison, WI 53701-1054 T (608) 255-8316 E akatz@artswisconsin.org W www.artswisconsin.org