A Look At Gender Based
Violence:
A Caribbean Perspective
Presented by BPW Barbados–
Marrianne Burnham, President
Patricia ...
Marrianne Burnham
President, BPW Barbados
MarBurn Health & Communications
Patricia Seale, BPW Barbados
Clinical Psychologi...
About BPW Barbados
The Business & Professional Women’s Club of
Barbados (Est. 1966), is a “status-of-women”
organisation a...
BPW Barbados
Accomplishments
 2014: Opened a One-Stop-Shop Crisis & Resource Centre - USA PEPFAR-GBV/
HIV Grant; Awarded ...
Dame Maizie Barker-Welch
Past Regional Coordinator, BPW
International
The Hon. Maizie Irene Barker-Welch, BCH, CHB,
(Barba...
Who We Work With
 The Government of Barbados
 The Royal Barbados Police Force
 Social Service Agencies/ NGOs
◦ Family P...
Presentation Outline
 Gender Based Violence (GBV) in the
Caribbean
 Challenges and similarities of doing work
around GBV...
Definition of Gender Based
Violence
 “Any act of gender-based violence
that results in, or is likely to result in,
physic...
Gender Based Violence
 GBV may constitute
 A violation of women’s human rights,
◦ the right to life,
◦ the right to equa...
Types of Violence
 Verbal
 Physical
 Emotional
 Psychological
 Sexual
 Financial
Factors related to GBV
 Pattern of abusive behaviours in any relationship
 Used by one partner to gain or maintain power...
Tension
Building Phase
Explosion
Reconciliation
Honeymoon
Fear
Denial
Abuser apologies, blames
victim, gives excuses, deni...
STATISTICS
Globally, 1 out of every 3 women
(35%) will experience sexual and/or
physical abuse in her lifetime, and
30% wi...
A Note on Economic Impact
Country Cost of Domestic
Violence
 U.S. economy more than $5.8 billion
 United Kingdom £23 billion per year
 Australia ...
Cost of Violence
 Estimates of the costs of violence
against women are so high that a lower
percentage of some countries’...
Costs to the Employers -1
 Severe financial and economic burden
that domestic violence imposes on
victims, households, th...
Costs to the Employers -2
 Increased security requirements
 Legal fees/liability issues
 Decreased productivity
 Damag...
Impact on Productivity
 Increased Absenteeism
◦ Physical abuse victims miss an average of 3 days per
month
◦ 46% of victi...
Direct Costs of GBV
 Measure the value of goods and services
used to respond to domestic violence, for
which there is typ...
Indirect Costs of GBV
 Capture the effects of domestic
violence with no direct monetary
exchange
 Most prominent –
◦ Red...
Gender Based Violence in the
Caribbean
 700 islands
 English-speaking Caribbean – stable
democracies & independence
 Fo...
GBV in the Caribbean
 “Traditional socializing agents of family,
church, and school are being replaced by
technology and ...
Combatting Gender Based
Violence
 Strengthening post education
opportunities
 Advocate for equal pay
 Campaign for equa...
Combatting Gender Based
Violence
 Develop policies that address
◦ discrimination against women,
◦ promote gender equality...
Gender Based Violence in the
Caribbean
GBV in the Caribbean
 Global average rape: 15 per 100,000
 Three C’bean comprise the top 10
countries with the highest r...
Tackling GBV in the Caribbean
PROGRESS, PROCESS &
CONSTRAINTS
STRATEGY– COUNTRY ACTIONS
PLANS
Context
 Until the 1990s only general assault
laws protected women from violence.
 Since 1990s increase in legislation t...
Countries with Action Plans…
 Antigua and Barbuda,
 Belize
 Grenada,
 Jamaica,
 St.Kitts-Nevis.
 St. Lucia (not yet ...
UNIFEM/UN Women support
 To women’s groups to support advocacy
 To governments for reviews of policing and prosecution o...
Constraints to Implementation of
Country Action Plans
 Inadequate institutional capacity of implementing
partners (State,...
Lessons learned
 GBV CAPS when developed in a participatory mode provide
focus to efforts and strengthen coordination bet...
BPW Barbados: Anti-GBV
Strategies
 1986: Rape Hotline
 1992: Domestic Violence Legislation
 1997: Virtual Crisis Centre...
Barbados Model: Crisis &
Resource Centre
 NGO led model – grant funded
 Coordinated community response (CCR) model which...
Barbados Model: One-Stop-
Shop – Services
 Advocates
◦ Domestic violence advocates are experienced in providing
assistanc...
Barbados One-Stop-Model
 Health Services
◦ Referral to the appropriate medical unit
◦ Private/public
◦ Forensic
 Legal A...
Barbados One-Stop Shop
Model
 Data Collection from various entry points
◦ Disaggregated Data
◦ Collation
 Training /Educ...
Resource Centre
 Provide information on essential public
and private resources pertinent to
GBV, Sexual and Reproductive ...
Benefits
 Targets both males and females
 Walk-in Centre
 NGO-led
 Coordinated response
 Multidisciplinary approach/
...
BPW Barbados Anti-GBV
Strategies
 UNiTE Campaign – UN Women
◦ Edutainment
◦ Local entertainers – male and female
BPW Barbados Anti-GBV
Strategies
 Fantasy Shot Documentary
 Youtube “Fantasy Shot Barbados”
BPW Barbados Anti-GBV
Strategies
 School Education & Intervention
 Diamonds Mentorship Programme
 Youth Crisis Hotline ...
BPW Barbados Anti-GBV
Strategies
 Capacity Building – GBV Advocate
Training
 Police Training
 Social Work Training
 Te...
Engaging Men as Partners
 White Ribbon Campaign
 Partners for Peace Programme
 School Education & Intervention
 Male A...
Partners for Peace Program –
UN Women
 Standardized court-based violence
intervention for men – 16 weeks, court-
mandated...
A Note on Human Trafficking in
Barbados
 National Task Force on Human
Trafficking
 Barbados – destination country
 BPW ...
Looking forward
 Police
 Legislation
 Funding
 Walk-In Centre
 Political Will
 Economic Empowerment Programmes
 Wom...
Looking Forward
 Social Media
 Crisis Intevention via Social Media
 Walking into Walls
◦ https://www.facebook.com/Walki...
Thank You!
 The Business and Professional
Women’s Club of Barbados –
Registered Charity #190
 P.O. Box 381, Bridgetown,
...
Thank You!
 Coconut Bread & Rum Cake at the
Barbados Booth!!!
 Get Your Taste of Barbados Today!!!
Edu3   burnham marrianne
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  • A
  • GBV and men
  • Denial –minimizing the abuse, acting like it never happened
    Love…… Fear
    The Cycle of Abuse keeps you fearful and off balance both emotionally and psychologically. Look at the diagram of the cycle shown below... you will most certainly recognize this vicious and devastating wheel spinning within your abusive relationship.
    Each time you spin the cycle victim loses a little of themselves. Longer the abuse, shorter the time between phases.
  • The programme is grounded in basic principles that include prioritising the safety and protection of women who are victims of violence and the acknowledgement of accountability and responsibility by the perpetrator. In the process of the 16-week programme facilitated by a mixed sex team, men confront harmful ideas about women and about masculinity, examine unequal power relationships that fuel violence and accept personal responsibility for ending their violent behaviour.
    The programme has been implemented in Grenada, Trinidad and Tobago, St. Lucia, Jamaica, Belize and BVI. In 2010 the programme strengthened its internal coherence by developing methods for engaging victims, developing a framework for after support for the men post PFP as well as adaption of the programme as a prevention tool.
    http://www.unifemcar.org/
  • Edu3 burnham marrianne

    1. 1. A Look At Gender Based Violence: A Caribbean Perspective Presented by BPW Barbados– Marrianne Burnham, President Patricia Seale – Shelter Director
    2. 2. Marrianne Burnham President, BPW Barbados MarBurn Health & Communications Patricia Seale, BPW Barbados Clinical Psychologist Patricia Seale has been a domestic violence advocate for over 18 years in USA, and Barbados providing services as a clinician, supervisor, administrator, researcher and educator/trainer. She had worked in the mental health field with experience in assessment and treatment of psychological trauma in inpatient and community based programs. She has served as Director of the BPW Shelter for Abused Women and a member of BPW Barbados since 2001. She has represented Barbados and has been a trainer at regional and international conferences on domestic violence, sexual violence and human trafficking. She was part of the Barbados’ team who won the Gertrude Mongella Award at the 2008 BPW International Congress and hosted the “Say NO to Violence Workshop at the Congress”. She advises on issues relating to “at risk” individuals and is wholly committed to mentoring and empowering adults and youth to overcome obstacles through their victimization and ultimately regain their self-esteem. She is a Barbadian registered Counselling Psychologist, a US Certified Counselor, trainer and educator who holds a graduate degree in Counseling and diplomas in public administration and education. Since 2008, Ms. Burnham has been a member of the Business and Professional Women's Club of Barbados (BPW Barbados), an affiliate of BPW International which develops the professional, leadership and business potential of women on all levels through advocacy, mentoring, networking, skill building and economic empowerment programmes and projects around the world. President for the 2012-2015 term, the extensive work of BPW has become a new calling for her with a special personal interest in gender and health. Ms. Burnham is a member of Barbados’ National Task Force on Human Trafficking and plays an active role in the flagship Gender-Based Violence projects of the organization. She is proud to be overseeing the opening of the BPW Crisis & Resource Centre as part of a Reduce GBV & HIV project; the first walk-in multi-service centre of its kind in Barbados. Ms. Burnham is looking forward to “getting back to business” with a strong focus on women’s economic empowerment.
    3. 3. About BPW Barbados The Business & Professional Women’s Club of Barbados (Est. 1966), is a “status-of-women” organisation and a chapter of the International Federation of Business and Professional Women. BPW Barbados focuses on elevating the status of women, through training & development, business & entrepreneurship, improvements in health & freedom from violence. “Empowered Women Leading Business” is our theme for the 2012-2015 term. Current programmes focus on advocacy & capacity building to promote economic and social empowerment in women and girls. Gender-Based Violence is a speciality of BPW Barbados having operated Barbados’ only Crisis Centre & Shelter for many years.
    4. 4. BPW Barbados Accomplishments  2014: Opened a One-Stop-Shop Crisis & Resource Centre - USA PEPFAR-GBV/ HIV Grant; Awarded HR Development  2012: Appointed to National Task Force on Human Trafficking; Collaborated with the local artistes in the UN’s UNiTE Campaign.  2011: Implementation of Children’s Counselling & Intervention Programme: individual and group therapy for children accompanying their mothers in the Shelter.  2005: Lead agency chosen to partner with the Barbados Bureau of Gender Affairs & International Organisation on Migration for an island-wide Human Trafficking Awareness Campaign trafficking  2003: First annual collaboration began with The Albert Schweitzer Institute of Quinnipiac University, Connecticut,USA to host faculty and graduate students for volunteer capacity building seminar with local law enforcement,social workers, crisis intervention workers and individuals in the pertinent areas of Gender Based Violence.  1998: Shelter for Abused Women opened with the assistance of the Barbados Government. Shelter provides a safehouse for women & children with various counselling & intervention services.  1997: Crisis Centre is created in response to the need for further community outreach, education & intervention services in the area of Gender Based Violence.  1986: Crisis Hotline established for victims of rape. Today it is a 24-hour hotline for victims of all forms of violence.
    5. 5. Dame Maizie Barker-Welch Past Regional Coordinator, BPW International The Hon. Maizie Irene Barker-Welch, BCH, CHB, (Barbados Centennial Honour, Companion Honour of Barbados), and avid promoter of women's causes, was born in Barbados on September 17,1927. Her teaching career spans the St. Bernard's School, the St. Gabriel Girls' School; the Foundation Girls' School; the Ursuline Convent and Codrington High School. She was a Dorothy Cadbury Fellow at Selly Oak University in Birmingham, UK, in 1982-83. Hon. Barker-Welch was Vice President and President of the Barbados National Organisation of Women (NOW) founded in 1970; NOW's representative in the Caribbean Women's Association (CARIWA) and Barbados' representative at the first UN Conference for Women on Population Development in 1973. She was Barbados' delegate to the Inter American Commission of Women in 1986-1994, President of the Business and Professional Women's Club of Barbados, and Regional Coordinator for the English speaking Caribbean and USA, Canada - attending its worldwide conferences. In 1986, Hon. Barker-Welch entered Parliament as the Democratic Labour Party (DLP) representative for the St. Joseph Constituency. She was appointed Parliamentary Secretary in the Ministry of Labour and Community Development, also serving in other ministries including the Ministry for Women's Affairs. She was appointed Senator from 1991-1994. Past President, BPW Barbados
    6. 6. Who We Work With  The Government of Barbados  The Royal Barbados Police Force  Social Service Agencies/ NGOs ◦ Family Planning, C’bean HIV Alliance, National Organisation of Women  Gender Institute, University of the West Indies  USA Embassy  European Union  UN Women, UNFPA
    7. 7. Presentation Outline  Gender Based Violence (GBV) in the Caribbean  Challenges and similarities of doing work around GBV  Barriers to seeking services & the challenges that arise when they do.  The Barbados One-Stop-Shop Model - multidisciplinary, coordinated response to GBV & other Models in the Caribbean  The Economic Impact of GBV - VAW Cost Calculator  New Trends in Prevention  Useful online resources
    8. 8. Definition of Gender Based Violence  “Any act of gender-based violence that results in, or is likely to result in, physical, sexual or psychological harm or suffering to women, including threats of such acts, coercion or arbitrary deprivations of liberty, whether occurring in public or in private life.”  UN Declaration on the Elimination of Violence against Women (DEVAW) adopted by General Assembly 1993
    9. 9. Gender Based Violence  GBV may constitute  A violation of women’s human rights, ◦ the right to life, ◦ the right to equal protection under the law ◦ the right to equality in the family ◦ the right to the highest standard attainable of physical and mental health. Source: CEDAW General Recommendation No. 19 on VAW
    10. 10. Types of Violence  Verbal  Physical  Emotional  Psychological  Sexual  Financial
    11. 11. Factors related to GBV  Pattern of abusive behaviours in any relationship  Used by one partner to gain or maintain power and control over another intimate partner.  Include physical, sexual, emotional, economic, spiritual or psychological abuse  Purpose is to intimidate, manipulate, humiliate, isolate, frighten, terrorize, coerce, threaten, blame, hurt, injure, or wound another person  Varies in frequency and severity  Occurs on a continuum, one hit that may or may not impact the victim to chronic severe battering.
    12. 12. Tension Building Phase Explosion Reconciliation Honeymoon Fear Denial Abuser apologies, blames victim, gives excuses, denies it happened or its not that bad Incident finished, calm, idealised & romantic Verbal, physical, emotional, sexual, financial actual abuse Minor verbal/physical abuse, victim feel tension, breakdown in communication, feels like walking on eggshells, tries to control situation, longest phase The Cycle of Violence (Walker)
    13. 13. STATISTICS Globally, 1 out of every 3 women (35%) will experience sexual and/or physical abuse in her lifetime, and 30% will experience violence at the hands of an intimate partner.
    14. 14. A Note on Economic Impact
    15. 15. Country Cost of Domestic Violence  U.S. economy more than $5.8 billion  United Kingdom £23 billion per year  Australia - A$8.1 billion  Canada - CAN$4.2 billion,  Caribbean Cost - ??????
    16. 16. Cost of Violence  Estimates of the costs of violence against women are so high that a lower percentage of some countries’ Gross Domestic Product is spent on primary education than on domestic violence costs. According to the report, the costs of intimate partner violence are driven up by factors like lost income and productivity, health care and police services.  World Bank Report April 2014, Violence against Women
    17. 17. Costs to the Employers -1  Severe financial and economic burden that domestic violence imposes on victims, households, the public sector, private businesses, and society as a whole.  Domestic violence significantly impedes economic growth and development
    18. 18. Costs to the Employers -2  Increased security requirements  Legal fees/liability issues  Decreased productivity  Damaged property  Secondary victims are traumatized or harmed  Administrative/human resources
    19. 19. Impact on Productivity  Increased Absenteeism ◦ Physical abuse victims miss an average of 3 days per month ◦ 46% of victims have gone home sick due to stress of victimization  Reduced efficiency ◦ 71% report difficulty concentrating while at work ◦ 63% say they are unable to perform the job to the best of their abilities ◦ Increased tardiness ◦ Use of pain medication for physical injuries  Increase in Job loss/Turnover rate ◦ 5-27% of victims report job loss as a direct result of IPV ◦ Reasons: shame, fear, child care issues or forced by abuser to resign
    20. 20. Direct Costs of GBV  Measure the value of goods and services used to respond to domestic violence, for which there is typically a monetary exchange.  Direct costs ◦ healthcare services, ◦ social and welfare services, ◦ counseling, ◦ police and criminal justice services, ◦ legal services, ◦ replacing property damaged by an abuser
    21. 21. Indirect Costs of GBV  Capture the effects of domestic violence with no direct monetary exchange  Most prominent – ◦ Reduced earnings and lower productivity ◦ Victims tend to earn approx. one-half to two-thirds of what non-abused women earn
    22. 22. Gender Based Violence in the Caribbean  700 islands  English-speaking Caribbean – stable democracies & independence  Former colonies  Slavery - major part of our history  Violence is part of our culture  30-50% of murders in Caribbean – DV (UWI Gender Studies)
    23. 23. GBV in the Caribbean  “Traditional socializing agents of family, church, and school are being replaced by technology and a popular culture, which promote gratuitous violence and legitimize highly stereotypical models of aggressive masculinity. This aggressive masculinity and homophobia feed into the existing high levels of violence against women, and encourage men to exhibit aggression as their badge of masculinity. The impacts of these trends are exacerbated by the very small size of the islands. Gender based violence seems to be on the increase. A positive trend is that more men are challenging the model of aggressive masculinity.”  Dr. Rosina Wiltshite, UN Gender Advocate,
    24. 24. Combatting Gender Based Violence  Strengthening post education opportunities  Advocate for equal pay  Campaign for equal representation on national and local levels  Increase public awareness to the legal and human rights of individuals  Initiate public awareness campaigns on reproductive health issues and gender-based violence.
    25. 25. Combatting Gender Based Violence  Develop policies that address ◦ discrimination against women, ◦ promote gender equality, ◦ The safety of women  Changing cultural gender norms  Improving economic and social opportunities for women.  Multi-sectoral response.  One-Stop- Shop Response
    26. 26. Gender Based Violence in the Caribbean
    27. 27. GBV in the Caribbean  Global average rape: 15 per 100,000  Three C’bean comprise the top 10 countries with the highest rape incidence worldwide  133 per 100,000 Bahamas  112 per 100,000 St. Vincent  51 per 100,000 Jamaica  25 per 100,000 Barbados (not in top 10)
    28. 28. Tackling GBV in the Caribbean PROGRESS, PROCESS & CONSTRAINTS STRATEGY– COUNTRY ACTIONS PLANS
    29. 29. Context  Until the 1990s only general assault laws protected women from violence.  Since 1990s increase in legislation to qddress domestic violence, sexual violence and abuse;  Few countries have legislation against sexual harrassment.  Statistics:
    30. 30. Countries with Action Plans…  Antigua and Barbuda,  Belize  Grenada,  Jamaica,  St.Kitts-Nevis.  St. Lucia (not yet finalised).  Bahamas ( Preparation just initiated)  Barbados (working on National Policy on Gender)
    31. 31. UNIFEM/UN Women support  To women’s groups to support advocacy  To governments for reviews of policing and prosecution of sexual offences  To governments (through National Machineries for Women) for the preparation/revision of legislation  To governments (through NMWs)for the preparation of Country Action Plans (9)  Collaboration developed with regional bodies (OECS, CARICOM, Judicial Education Institute of the Eastern Caribbean Supreme Court, Association of Caribbean Commissioners of Police (ACCP) and Caribbean Ombusdsmen Association.)  Support to development of national protocols (Grenada, Belize)  Men as Champions for Change  Behaviour change interventions for male offenders
    32. 32. Constraints to Implementation of Country Action Plans  Inadequate institutional capacity of implementing partners (State, civil society)  Variable political will in a context dominated by patriarchal values  Cost of access to justice to affected women and girls (including time way from work or care of children, loss of jobs etc)  Socio-economic and cultural constraints (dependency on abusers, access to female bodies as cultural norm etc.)  Sex disaggregated data and statistics are lacking;  Financial resource constraints highly indebted Middle-income countries (all Caribbean except Haiti).
    33. 33. Lessons learned  GBV CAPS when developed in a participatory mode provide focus to efforts and strengthen coordination between groups and across sectors;  Public education and media outreach strengthen advocacy and use of services;  Cultural transformation is the most fundamental and most difficult challenge;  Data and documentation of cases of domestic and sexual violence and abuse is needed to improve evidence –based approaches;  More research is needed into underlying causes of both negative and positive behaviours;  Sharing best practices, models and approaches helps create a multiplier effect;  Monitoring and evaluation and reporting need greater emphasis.
    34. 34. BPW Barbados: Anti-GBV Strategies  1986: Rape Hotline  1992: Domestic Violence Legislation  1997: Virtual Crisis Centre  1999: Shelter for Battered Women  2003: Human Trafficking Advocacy  2012: Human Trafficking Task Force  2012: Domestic Violence Legislation Review  2014: Crisis & Resource Centre – One Stop Shop Model
    35. 35. Barbados Model: Crisis & Resource Centre  NGO led model – grant funded  Coordinated community response (CCR) model which engages the entire community in efforts to develop a common understanding of violence against women and to change social norms and attitudes that contribute to violence against women.  Integrated public and private services  Public Health Services: Hospital, Polyclinics  Private Health Services: Private Clinics, Doctors’ Offices  Victims’ Support Services: Hotline, Shelter Services  Law Enforcement  Legal: Legal Aid & Clinics  Social Services: Welfare  Faith-Based Organisations
    36. 36. Barbados Model: One-Stop- Shop – Services  Advocates ◦ Domestic violence advocates are experienced in providing assistance to those victimized by domestic violence. Advocates understand the criminal justice, family court, and social service systems and are familiar with other community resources that might be helpful to you. Advocates can also provide you practical and emotional support.  Intake Assessment ◦ Intake specialist who meets with you to determine what services you need. Once the intake is completed, the intake specialist will make referrals to FJC partners and advocates.  Safety Planning  Court Advocacy
    37. 37. Barbados One-Stop-Model  Health Services ◦ Referral to the appropriate medical unit ◦ Private/public ◦ Forensic  Legal Assistance ◦ Legal clinics ◦ Legal advice  Sexual and Reproductive Health Support ◦ Counselling, interventions, testing – referral  Law Enforcement ◦ Collaboration with police at various levels ◦ Interview space for clients ◦ FCIU, Sexual Offences
    38. 38. Barbados One-Stop Shop Model  Data Collection from various entry points ◦ Disaggregated Data ◦ Collation  Training /Education ◦ Community ◦ Workplace ◦ Schools  Prevention Programmes  Perpetrator Intervention ◦ Partners for Peace ◦ Other
    39. 39. Resource Centre  Provide information on essential public and private resources pertinent to GBV, Sexual and Reproductive Health and related concerns  NGOS that target males, females, children, at risk populations ◦ E.g. Homeless  Information Exchange Funders/ Donors info  Available programmes & services
    40. 40. Benefits  Targets both males and females  Walk-in Centre  NGO-led  Coordinated response  Multidisciplinary approach/ Stakeholder engagement  Victim-centered  Focus on prevention and mitigation of GBV
    41. 41. BPW Barbados Anti-GBV Strategies  UNiTE Campaign – UN Women ◦ Edutainment ◦ Local entertainers – male and female
    42. 42. BPW Barbados Anti-GBV Strategies  Fantasy Shot Documentary  Youtube “Fantasy Shot Barbados”
    43. 43. BPW Barbados Anti-GBV Strategies  School Education & Intervention  Diamonds Mentorship Programme  Youth Crisis Hotline Training  Personal Development Programme  Clothesline Project  TRIM – Barbers& Hairdressers  TRAP
    44. 44. BPW Barbados Anti-GBV Strategies  Capacity Building – GBV Advocate Training  Police Training  Social Work Training  Teachers  Collaborations – Center for Women and Families, Connecticut
    45. 45. Engaging Men as Partners  White Ribbon Campaign  Partners for Peace Programme  School Education & Intervention  Male Advocates
    46. 46. Partners for Peace Program – UN Women  Standardized court-based violence intervention for men – 16 weeks, court- mandated  Psycho-educational approach to prevent male perpetrator from repeating the violence  Focus on safety & protection of victims  Accountability & responsibility by perpetrator  Framework for after support  Grenada, Trinidad, St. Lucia, Belize, British Virgin Islands
    47. 47. A Note on Human Trafficking in Barbados  National Task Force on Human Trafficking  Barbados – destination country  BPW Crisis Centre & Shelter offer support services  Legislation ◦ Recognise all forms of Human Trafficking  International Organisation of Migration  Government  Multi-sectoral approach
    48. 48. Looking forward  Police  Legislation  Funding  Walk-In Centre  Political Will  Economic Empowerment Programmes  Women’s Empowerment Principles ◦ Corporate Support
    49. 49. Looking Forward  Social Media  Crisis Intevention via Social Media  Walking into Walls ◦ https://www.facebook.com/WalkingIntoWa lls  Code Red For Gender Justice ◦ https://www.facebook.com/redforgender
    50. 50. Thank You!  The Business and Professional Women’s Club of Barbados – Registered Charity #190  P.O. Box 381, Bridgetown, Barbados, West Indies; bpwbarbadosonline@gmail.com; bpwbarbados.wordpress.com  246-836-5070/5068; Facebook – BPW Barbados Online
    51. 51. Thank You!  Coconut Bread & Rum Cake at the Barbados Booth!!!  Get Your Taste of Barbados Today!!!

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