TSEM Spring 2014 Fath Class 3

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  • False information can come in many different forms!
  • There is so much information out there. You can find anything on the internet and it’s not attributed to anyone.Why don’t people seem to think it’s that bad to copy someone?What about downloading music? How does this relate to academia? Real life?
  • Think about how you are leaving a record.3 types:Butler – creating a bufferSock puppet – Boosting ourselvesChinese Water Army -
  • Not only is this a topic that is discussed in the “real world” but it is also an important issue on campus.Emphasizing the professor’s approach to plagiarism, while also pointing out that this is of concern to the entire TU/academic community.We now have a system where if a student is sanctioned for plagiarism by a professor, that is not the end of the matter. The professor can report the student centrally. If there is a “strike 2” the student has to go before Judicial Affairs and face further consequences: the student may be suspended from TU.Bob Giordani: 100 cases a year reported. (Imagine how many go unreported!)1-3 repeat offenders a year. These go to Judicial Affairs for penalties up to and including suspension from TU.There has been about one suspension each year.
  • https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/717/10/
  • Example B is plagiarized. This is an example of paraphrase plagiarism.Many student are not aware that this is plagiarism, but it can get you in trouble!!Problems:Student paper follows original source too closely. Rewording is light; sentences follow identical structure as source. In-text citation to Burrowsdoes not solve this—in doing so we acknowledge Burrows’ idea, but not his wording, which this passage exploits.To fix this:If the phrasing of the source merits this, QUOTE exact words used, using quotation marks+ keep the in-text citation to Burrows+ keep the entry in Works Cited list.How many words in a row are ok to keep?You may hear “rules of thumb” such as the “three word rule”: quote and cite if you are using more than three words in a row from the source. There is no hard-and-fast rule. Three, two, or even one word might be distinctive enough to be quoted and cited, depending on the context.For instance, Ed Tenner wrote of the “plagiosphere” in Technology Review.This word, coined by Tenner, refers to the notion that everything has been said and is out there somewhere on the World Wide Web. (Interesting article by the way!)If I were to write about this concept and to use the word, I would want to cite Tenner. Otherwise, it would appear that I myself had made up the word and the concept it represents. The first time I used the word “plagiosphere” I could put it in quotes, add an in-text citation, and include a works cited entry at the end of my paper. Additional uses of the word in the paper would not need to be quoted, but if I used ideas from Tenner’s articles, those would require in-text citations in the body of the paper.
  • TSEM Spring 2014 Fath Class 3

    1. 1. TSEM 102: Plagiarism and Proper Citation Laksamee Putnam – Research & Instruction Librarian Slides: http://bit.ly/spring2014fathslidesc3
    2. 2. First…  Laksamee Putnam  lputnam@towson.edu  Cook Library Reference: ◦ 410.704.2462. ◦ IM/email  Phone: 410.704.3746.  Twitter: @CookLibraryofTU  Albert S. Cook facebook profile  Slides: http://bit.ly/spring2014fathslidesc3
    3. 3. A quick plug…  #whatiluvaboutcook  http://bit.ly/whatiluvaboutcook  What: Show us what you love about TU‟s Cook Library using Instagram, and we‟ll reward your awesomeness during finals week.  How: ◦ Take a fantastic and creative photo or video showing what you love about Towson University‟s Albert S. Cook Library ◦ Upload it to Instagram ◦ Tag your creation with #whatiluvaboutcook ◦ Present your Instagram username at the door of CK512 to get exclusive access to this new classroom with iMacs and coffee and snacks from 9am-11am on the first day of finals (Wed. May 14th)
    4. 4. Agenda  Define plagiarism  Real world examples and discussion  Towson Policy – Academic Integrity  Chicago citation style
    5. 5. What is your definition of plagiarism? http://bit.ly/TSEMpoll12014sp
    6. 6. An interesting side story  A hoax app was created to fool the media  What‟s the big deal?
    7. 7. It‟s out there, why not reuse it? ImagebyDuaneHoffmann www.msnbc.msn.com/id/32657885 Plagiarism: Maybe it‟s not so bad (2013) On the media podcast. http://wny.cc/1dNVisf Pretchel, J. (2014) Now Shia LaBeouf is plagiarizing Kenneth Goldsmith. Gapers Block. http://bit.ly/1iLsSHs Kenneth Goldsmith suggests that music and art are built on plagiarism, and now the internet is making that possible for text. What do you think of his philosophy and the implications of “patchwriting”? So, Shia LaBeouf is plagiarizing Kenneth Goldsmith, whose work is all about creative plagiarism. What makes some plagiarism “wrong” or “right”?
    8. 8. It‟s out there, why not reuse it?  What does intellectual property mean to you? Is it an important idea, why or why not?  With so much information out there, is there such a thing as an original idea? Does that mean you have to credit every single person?  How does plagiarism affect academia?
    9. 9. Why does it matter?  What are the pros and cons of so much information being online?  What do you do to be sure you‟re finding more than “information junk food”? ◦ How do you evaluate the information you find while researching?  Why is it important to support your argument with valid sources?
    10. 10. Digital Lies  Hancock, J. (2012) The future of lying. TED: Ideas worth spreading. http://bit.ly/1iScQtl
    11. 11. The point is…  No matter where you are, you will constantly need to assess the information around you  In order to be an informed consumer you should know how to evaluate the information you acquire  In order to support your own arguments you should know how to research your question and cite your sources
    12. 12.  Policy for Academic Integrity: ◦ http://bit.ly/PiX2z2  Two Strike System  100 reported cases a year  One suspension a year What is the policy at Towson?
    13. 13. Why is it important to cite your sources?  Poll ◦ http://bit.ly/TSEMpoll22014sp
    14. 14. What needs to be cited?  Books  Web Pages  YouTube videos  Magazine articles  Graphics  VHS,DVD, audio, etc.  Government reports  Statistics  Encyclopedia articles  Any source of information!
    15. 15. Common Knowledge Quandary  Some examples: ◦ Waste not, want not. ◦ George Washington was the first president of the US ◦ The earth is round  When in doubt, cite it.
    16. 16. Style Manuals  Different disciplines use different style manuals ◦ Social Sciences = American Psychological Association (APA) ◦ Humanities = MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers (MLA) ◦ Physical and Natural Science = Chicago/Turabian Author-Date
    17. 17. Chicago Style  Citations
    18. 18. Chicago Style  References
    19. 19. What needs to be cited?  Direct quotes  Ideas borrowed  Paraphrased material
    20. 20. The wrong way to paraphrase: Failure to Cite Source  Original  “They desire, for example, virtue and the absence of vice, no less really than pleasure and the absence of pain.”  Source: Mill, John Stuart. “Utilitarianism.” On Liberty and Other Essays. New York: Oxford University Press, 1998. Quote is from page 169.  Paraphrase  People want morality just as much as they want happiness.
    21. 21. The wrong way to paraphrase: Lack of Significant Rewording  Original  “To the young American architects who made the pilgrimage, the most dazzling figure of all was Walter Gropius, founder of the Bauhaus School.”  Source: Wolfe, Tom. From Bauhaus to Our House. New York: Farrar Straus Giroux, 1981. Quote is from page 10.  Paraphrase  To young American architects who went to Germany, the most dazzling figure was Walter Gropius, founder of the Bauhaus School (Wolfe 1981).
    22. 22. Example A  Original  Don't look for one of these tech heavyweights to knock out the other. Yet if history is any guide, Google's approach may win out over the long term. Recall that in the early 1980s Apple lost its lead in the PC market when Microsoft enlisted the aid of hordes of software developers and dozens of PC manufacturers. Now, if Google can marshal such a united front, Apple could again be swamped by the collective innovations.  Student  Google's approach may win out over the long term. In the early 1980s Apple lost its lead in the PC market as Microsoft enlisted the aid of hordes of software developers and dozens of PC manufacturers. http://bit.ly/TSEMpoll32014sp
    23. 23. Example B  Original  Don't look for one of these tech heavyweights to knock out the other. Yet if history is any guide, Google's approach may win out over the long term. Recall that in the early 1980s Apple lost its lead in the PC market when Microsoft enlisted the aid of hordes of software developers and dozens of PC manufacturers. Now, if Google can marshal such a united front, Apple could again be swamped by the collective innovations.  Student  History tells us that Google's approach may be successful over the long term. In the early 1980s Apple lagged in the PC market as Microsoft collaborated with software developers and dozens of PC manufacturers. Now, if Google would only summon a united front, Apple could again be swamped by the collective innovations (Burrows 2000). http://bit.ly/TSEMpoll42014sp
    24. 24. Example C  Original  Don't look for one of these tech heavyweights to knock out the other. Yet if history is any guide, Google's approach may win out over the long term. Recall that in the early 1980s Apple lost its lead in the PC market when Microsoft enlisted the aid of hordes of software developers and dozens of PC manufacturers. Now, if Google can marshal such a united front, Apple could again be swamped by the collective innovations.  Student  Google stands a chance of beating Apple if it can benefit from the pooled ideas of software developers and device manufacturers, following the strategy that Microsoft employed to Apple‟s detriment in the early „80s. http://bit.ly/TSEMpoll52014sp
    25. 25. Example D  Original  Don't look for one of these tech heavyweights to knock out the other. Yet if history is any guide, Google's approach may win out over the long term. Recall that in the early 1980s Apple lost its lead in the PC market when Microsoft enlisted the aid of hordes of software developers and dozens of PC manufacturers. Now, if Google can marshal such a united front, Apple could again be swamped by the collective innovations.  Student  It is possible that in the battle of the “tech heavyweights” Google might eventually prevail over Apple if it follows the strategy that Microsoft employed to Apple‟s detriment during the early „80s: collaborating, and innovating, with software developers and manufacturers (Burrows 2000, 25). http://bit.ly/TSEMpoll62014sp
    26. 26. Paraphrasing Practice  “Pointing at the best information trumps creating the best information.”  Tweeted by Kenneth Goldsmith on the January 25th, 2014  Go here to enter your paraphrase: ◦ http://bit.ly/paraphrasepractice2013
    27. 27. Library Resources for Chicago
    28. 28. Questions?  Feel free to contact me: ◦ Laksamee Putnam ◦ lputnam@towson.edu ◦ 410.704.3746. ◦ Twitter: @CookLibraryofTU  Or any reference librarian: ◦ Visit Cook Library Reference Desk ◦ 410.704.2462. ◦ IM – tucookchat

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