Stages of Organizational Growth in an Entrepreneurial Organization

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This presentation was made at the Entrepreneur Organization's 2014 Conference in Toronto, Ontario on June 12th, by Behavioral Change Expert, Heather Hilliard. It demonstrates the different stages of development every business goes through - from infancy to adulthood - and shows the types of challenges that entrepreneur's face during each challenge.

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  • Characteristics, behaviors and needs of the entrepreneurial personality that cause the business to grow or stall
    The stages of authentic organizational growth
    5 key reasons entrepreneurs unconsciously resist moving their business to the next stage
    What stage your organization is at - identifying where your business is stuck
    Nurture or sell your business: Building the infrastructure and authentic growth process for taking your business to the next stage
  • Predetermined to be an entrepreneur based on our brain style
  • Our
  • Our
  • Visionary/Future oriented - anticipate future trends; identify & exploit elements of the business environment that lead to profitable & sustainable business
    Thrive on chaos - fast-paced, quick-minded; don’t need to be ready to start
    Competitive - orientation to being the best; seek to be ahead of the pack, not in or with it
    Confident, risk-takers; believe in their abilities & vision; tolerate uncertainty & ambiguity;
    Full of life, energy & optimism
    fun, playful, charismatic
    inspire & enthuse others
    Determination & can-do attitude
    energy & focus needed to bring a business into existence
    do what they love & love what they do
    Entrepreneurial leaders tend to go for the quick fix so they don’t have to slow down from the pace of growth they like driving toward which further gets in the way of finding how to organically and authentically move beyond where they are stuck. They try to find one thing or person that is the cause of the problem instead of reflecting on the organic growth needs of the business. As their personality is not naturally oriented to inward reflection, they don’t reflect on the authentic needs of the business. Instead, they look outside to best practices and impose what other companies do on their own. Most importantly, they can fail to look at the impact of their entrepreneurial leadership style, the negative experiences their employees may be having as a result, and the amount of chaos and lack of alignment of goals, productivity, behavior and values.
  • In perpetual growth mode (growth for the sake of growth itself)
    difficulty with slow growth
    inner drive to keep moving ahead
    Need for constant stimulation
    over-commit and overpromise
    create chaotic work environment
    Quick fix problem solving
    try to find one thing or person that is the cause of the problem
    don’t reflect on the organic growth needs of the business
    Externally focused, action oriented
    not naturally oriented to inward reflection
    look to what other companies do to fix problems
    Don’t consider (or don’t care about) the impact of their style on employees or the chaos they create
  • Enjoy the camaraderie of the start up business
    Don’t like to impose their agenda on others
    Believe everyone has similar need for autonomy & fail
    Fail to delegate authority
    Expect others to know what to do without defining it
    Expect others to know what they want without
  • Passage from stage to stage marked by crisis points – the discomfort of reaching the stage-related ceiling of expansion
    Limitations of entrepreneur cause business to get stuck in this place for long periods
    Spend most of their time reacting to problems in the business
    Frustrated and resentful of the time employees demand
    In the evolution of a company, from small to mid-sized and beyond, the needs of its people and the organization change as it goes through the natural stages that growth brings. We believe that businesses, like humans, have a predictable pattern of development over their life span. And, like humans, they have different needs during each stage of growth. Each of the stages is sequential, and the business needs to pass through each one in order to sustain their growth. The passage from stage to stage is marked by crisis points – the discomfort of reaching the stage-related ceiling of expansion. Often, organizations get stuck in this place for long periods, becoming increasingly reactive in their approach, as a result. Just when it looks like they have fixed one issue, something happens to put them right back into reactive mode again. Leaders keep doing what they have done to problem solve in the past, thinking that this should get them to where they want to grow. This is because they don’t know how to move organically and authentically beyond where they are stuck.
    In the evolution of a company, from small to mid-sized and beyond, the needs of its people and the organization change as it goes through the natural stages that growth brings. We believe that businesses, like humans, have a predictable pattern of development over their life span. And, like humans, they have different needs during each stage of growth. Each of the stages is sequential, and the business needs to pass through each one in order to sustain their growth. The passage from stage to stage is marked by crisis points – the discomfort of reaching the stage-related ceiling of expansion. Often, organizations get stuck in this place for long periods, becoming increasingly reactive in their approach, as a result. Just when it looks like they have fixed one issue, something happens to put them right back into reactive mode again. Leaders keep doing what they have done to problem solve in the past, thinking that this should get them to where they want to grow. This is because they don’t know how to move organically and authentically beyond where they are stuck.
  • Want the feelings of this stage to go on
    optimism, excitement, high energy
    power, potency & infallibility
    Breathing Life into the Business Everything & everyone dependent on the Entrepreneur
    youthful excitement
    exciting, fun, pregnant with possibilities
    Familial
    few people, personal connections
    informal
    Absence of defined structures, systems, reporting, roles, etc.
    everyone does what needs to be done
    Externally focused
    focus on market awareness, growth & survival of the business
    building rather than leading the business
    Focus on survival of the business
    Lack of branding or consistent identity internally and externally
    Leaders and employees on auto pilot
    Unconscious competent
    Don’t know what they don’t know
    Rise to the level of their incompetence
    Absence of business systems and processes
    Lack of planning, reactive to needs in the moment
    Lack of performance management/ accountability
    Lack of hiring practices
    Focus on survival of the business
    Lack of branding or consistent identity internally and externally
    Leaders and employees on auto pilot
    Unconscious competent
    Don’t know what they don’t know
    Rise to the level of their incompetence
    Organizational silos or closed systems
    Communication up and down, not connecting to other silos
    Individuals, teams operate without recognizing the impact on others
    Absence of business systems and processes
    Lack of planning, reactive to needs in the moment
    Lack of performance management/ accountability
    Lack of hiring practices
  • Breathing Life into the Business Everything & everyone dependent on the Entrepreneur
    youthful excitement
    All activity is focused on the product or service and how to get it to market
    Entrepreneur is at the hub of all activity
    Freedom given to all employees to self-manage
    Object to traditional hierarchy: build the culture as the ideal place they would like to belong to & work in
    exciting, fun, pregnant with possibilities
    Familial
    few people, personal connections
    informal
    Absence of defined structures, systems, reporting, roles, etc.
    everyone does what needs to be done
    Externally focused
    focus on market awareness, growth & survival of the business
    building rather than leading the business
    Focus on survival of the business
    Lack of branding or consistent identity internally and externally
    Leaders and employees on auto pilot
    Unconscious competent
    Don’t know what they don’t know
    Rise to the level of their incompetence
    Absence of business systems and processes
    Lack of planning, reactive to needs in the moment
    Lack of performance management/ accountability
    Lack of hiring practices
    Focus on survival of the business
    Lack of branding or consistent identity internally and externally
    Leaders and employees on auto pilot
    Unconscious competent
    Don’t know what they don’t know
    Rise to the level of their incompetence
    Organizational silos or closed systems
    Communication up and down, not connecting to other silos
    Individuals, teams operate without recognizing the impact on others
    Absence of business systems and processes
    Lack of planning, reactive to needs in the moment
    Lack of performance management/ accountability
    Lack of hiring practices
  • Crisis occurs when they aren’t feeling “high” on their business any more
    Increase of internal chaos
    working long & hard
    overpromising or commitments to secure sales leads to disgruntled employees
    Little role definition or organizational structures
    can’t distinguish between important/unimportant issues
    emotionally driven behaviors; acting out
    Entrepreneurs dependent on employees
    tolerate poor performance
    hiring practices are subjective, based on need
    energy spent dealing with issues
    Focus on building market awareness leads to internal chaos as the business grows
    Little definition or structure
    can’t distinguish between important/unimportant issues
    emotionally driven behaviors; acting out
    Unconscious self-destructive behaviors emerge
    Avoid issues
    Fail to honour commitments
    Change mind/direction
    Get involved with another venture
    Leaders become emotional when things don’t get done
    Employees are dependent on being told what to do
    Conflict and dissatisfaction go underground
    Tolerate poor performance
    Hire like minded people; hiring practices are subjective
    Employees thrown in where needed without training
    Energy spent fixing problems caused by failures in communication
    Opportunities fall through cracks
  • Whether you want to be around for the long haul or just build it enough to increase its market value to sell it you need to:
    To get to Stage 2, you need to:
    become aware of the changing needs of the business and employees
    recognize that way you lead & behave contributes to issues
    prepare to give form to your business with systems & processes
    be prepared to slow down
    realize you can’t grow the business without attending to it’s needs
  • Whether you want to be around for the long haul or just build it enough to increase its market value to sell it you need to:
    To get to Stage 2, you need to:
    become aware of the changing needs of the business and employees
    recognize that way you lead & behave contributes to issues
    prepare to give form to your business with systems & processes
    be prepared to slow down
    realize you can’t grow the business without attending to it’s needs
  • 2 tiered leadership hierarchy
    entrepreneur delegates management of business to manager(s)
    delegation of tasks without authority
    everyone reports in to same people
    decisions made without consultation
    Building of the business model & infrastructure
    Introduction of systems to stabilize growth
    systems for communicating, reporting
    processes and systems in some areas but not in others
    objectivity in hiring practices
    Planning without accountability
    goal setting without system for follow through
    strategic planning without planning system (sits on shelf)
    Leaders recognize inconsistent or fractured identity – employee and stakeholder experiences vary
    Growing awareness of business, leadership and people needs
    Growing awareness of the issues that are systemic in the organization
    Recognize that the business can’t sustain growth or survival without an infrastructure
    Recognize that financial results do not equal business success
    Concern for quality of working life and authentic work experiences
    Ability to identify issues but don’t know how to resolve them
    Off-the-shelf performance systems without training
    Goal setting without system for follow through
    Decisions made to resolve issues without consultation
    Attempts to improve hiring practices (person focused)
    Processes and systems in some areas but not in others
  • 2 tiered leadership hierarchy
    entrepreneur delegates management of business to manager(s)
    delegation of tasks without authority
    everyone reports in to same people
    decisions made without consultation
    Building of the business model & infrastructure
    Introduction of systems to stabilize growth
    systems for communicating, reporting
    processes and systems in some areas but not in others
    objectivity in hiring practices
    Planning without accountability
    goal setting without system for follow through
    strategic planning without planning system (sits on shelf)
    Leaders recognize inconsistent or fractured identity – employee and stakeholder experiences vary
    Growing awareness of business, leadership and people needs
    Growing awareness of the issues that are systemic in the organization
    Recognize that the business can’t sustain growth or survival without an infrastructure
    Recognize that financial results do not equal business success
    Concern for quality of working life and authentic work experiences
    Ability to identify issues but don’t know how to resolve them
    Off-the-shelf performance systems without training
    Goal setting without system for follow through
    Decisions made to resolve issues without consultation
    Attempts to improve hiring practices (person focused)
    Processes and systems in some areas but not in others
  • Resist focusing on what the business and employees need (not fun)
    No reward or intrinsic satisfaction (no high)
    employees seem to complain about everything
    Crisis occurs when there are too many demands for their time
    Your manager is siding with your employees against you
    Feel like the “bad guy” instead of the “hero” in your own business
    Growth of the business leads to:
    bottlenecks in the decision making process
    us & them mentality; power struggles
    reactive & independent decision making
    entrepreneur fails to follow own systems
    feeling overwhelmed
    Increased energy spent on dealing with employee issues; firing weakest performer and hiring repeatedly
    Employees are vocal about dissatisfaction; blame leaders and organization for issues
    Chaotic and disorganized, lack of alignment
    Absenteeism, presenteeism, employees “getting away” with not doing their work
    Leaders unsure of how to manage performance; blame employees for problems
    Leaders address performance issues and don’t follow up; no change
    Lack of cooperation; competition amongst team members, departments, etc.
    Employees offered some training; may or may not use new skills
  • Whether you want to be around for the long haul or just build it enough to increase its market value to sell it you need to:
    To get to Stage 2, you need to:
    become aware of the changing needs of the business and employees
    recognize that way you lead & behave contributes to issues
    prepare to give form to your business with systems & processes
    be prepared to slow down
    realize you can’t grow the business without attending to it’s needs
  • Consider the organization as a whole – what business and people need
    Separate entrepreneur’s & business identity
    Recognize the importance of the employee experience to the success of the business
    Recognize to build a professional organization, need professional help
    Stop putting band-aid solutions on issues
    Start looking at the organization as a whole instead of individual problems
    Get professional help: invest in building a professional organization poised for sustainable growth
    Recognize the importance of the employee experience to the success of the business
    Whether you want to be around for the long haul or just build it enough to increase its market value to sell it you need to:
    To get to Stage 3, you need to:
    stop putting band-aid solutions on issues
    start looking at the organization as a whole instead of in silos
    be prepared to get into the details of the organizational identity
    be prepared to self-assess and engage in leadership development
    focus their attention internally, investing in building the foundation for the organization
    recognize the importance of the employee experience to the success of the business
    reaLeadlize they can’t achieve the organizations potential or their own if they keep leading it they way they are
    recognize this cannot be done without external expertise and support and hire experts (such as Caliber)
  • Business entity defined, including identity, cultural norms, values & ecosystem it operates in
    Separate the entrepreneur from the business
    Entrepreneur has clearly defined role
    Create hierarchy to delegate authority throughout business
    Create a model for the business identity, including cultural norms, employee experiences & image
    Begin to look at the organization as an entity and not something with issues and problems to solve.
    Increased consciousness of organizational and need to align business and people practices
    Articulate the vision, identity, values, mission and purpose of the business; determine new branding aligned
    Create an organizational Ecosystem with a map of the interdependence of people, teams, departments, processes, etc.
    Clear definitions of each role, mandate, behaviors that align with and support with the overall identity of each part of the ecosystem (each employee, team, leader, processes, plans)
    Business systems and practices identified to support the organizations dynamic web of interdependent teams, individuals, etc.
    Understand and communicate how important each employee is to the business
    Begin to look at the organization as an entity
    Separate the entrepreneur from the business
    Recognition that the business can survive without you
    selecting and developing systems, processes, etc. that are congruent and aligned with the organization’s identity and purpose
    identifying employee needs
    Focus on creating a model for which will ensure authentic experiences for employees
    Employee survey to integrate needs of employees and the experiences they need to make them thrive
    Identify areas of incongruence with Organizational Identity
    Identify factors that create a lack of trust and inconsistent leadership
    Identify potential resistance to implementation of the network
  • Begin to look at the organization as an entity and not something with issues and problems to solve.
    Increased consciousness of organizational and need to align business and people practices
    Articulate the vision, identity, values, mission and purpose of the business; determine new branding aligned
    Create an organizational Ecosystem with a map of the interdependence of people, teams, departments, processes, etc.
    Clear definitions of each role, mandate, behaviors that align with and support with the overall identity of each part of the ecosystem (each employee, team, leader, processes, plans)
    Business systems and practices identified to support the organizations dynamic web of interdependent teams, individuals, etc.
    Understand and communicate how important each employee is to the business
    Begin to look at the organization as an entity
    Separate the entrepreneur from the business
    Recognition that the business can survive without you
    selecting and developing systems, processes, etc. that are congruent and aligned with the organization’s identity and purpose
    identifying employee needs
    Focus on creating a model for which will ensure authentic experiences for employees
    Employee survey to integrate needs of employees and the experiences they need to make them thrive
    Identify areas of incongruence with Organizational Identity
    Identify factors that create a lack of trust and inconsistent leadership
    Identify potential resistance to implementation of the network
  • Consultants can help this transition first by facilitating the decision to loose the reins of control. This can be difficult for a senior team used to total power, but it can also be a relief not to be constantly pestered with requests for decisions where the senior team actually know less and less about what the right thing is and are increasingly likely to accept recommendations anyway.
    Having given up much control, the senior team can now be coached more in strategic decision-making and managing in a way that encourages and trusts decisions from lower down the hierarchy. It is also a good idea here to spend time with the operational managers to help them feel and effectively handle their responsibilities.
    Crisis of control
    Perhaps unsurprisingly, the loosing of control leads a certain amount of chaos, particularly as junior managers grab their new authority and make varying decisions that may be at odds with one another and with the central strategy.
    This may make senior managers regret their decision to delegate, but the cat is now out of the bag and, with the increasing size of the company, a return to them making all the decisions is impractical.
  • Whether you want to be around for the long haul or just build it enough to increase its market value to sell it you need to:
    To get to Stage 2, you need to:
    become aware of the changing needs of the business and employees
    recognize that way you lead & behave contributes to issues
    prepare to give form to your business with systems & processes
    be prepared to slow down
    realize you can’t grow the business without attending to it’s needs
  • Consider the organization as a whole – what business and people need
    Separate entrepreneur’s & business identity
    Recognize the importance of the employee experience to the success of the business
    Recognize to build a professional organization, need professional help
    Stop putting band-aid solutions on issues
    Start looking at the organization as a whole instead of individual problems
    Get professional help: invest in building a professional organization poised for sustainable growth
    Recognize the importance of the employee experience to the success of the business
    Whether you want to be around for the long haul or just build it enough to increase its market value to sell it you need to:
    To get to Stage 3, you need to:
    stop putting band-aid solutions on issues
    start looking at the organization as a whole instead of in silos
    be prepared to get into the details of the organizational identity
    be prepared to self-assess and engage in leadership development
    focus their attention internally, investing in building the foundation for the organization
    recognize the importance of the employee experience to the success of the business
    reaLeadlize they can’t achieve the organizations potential or their own if they keep leading it they way they are
    recognize this cannot be done without external expertise and support and hire experts (such as Caliber)
  • Low employee turnover with a committed workforce
    Alignment of energy & focus on collective vision
    Employees are in roles that meet their needs and match their strengths and interests
    Success factors are identified, including employee development, meeting deadlines and team improvement challenges as well as organizational performance targets
    Critical success factors are the areas where you must do well in order to achieve the business objectives
    Top talent is attracted to the authentic business because of the reputation
    Each employee is aware of their importance in the organizational ecosystem and takes pride in ownership
    Recognition of the behaviors that support the organizational identity, internally and externally
  • Stages of Organizational Growth in an Entrepreneurial Organization

    1. 1. Leadership systems that create powerful companies Stages of Organizational Growth Entrepreneurs Organization June 5, 2014 Presented by: Heather Hilliard, Developed by: Anne Dranitsaris, Ph.D. Behavioral Change & Leadership Experts
    2. 2. What you will learn  Entrepreneurial personality  5 reasons entrepreneurs resist growth  Stages of authentic organizational growth  What stage your organization is at  Nurture or sell your business
    3. 3. Leadership systems that create powerful companies The Entrepreneurial Personality
    4. 4. The Entrepreneurial Personality  Our behaviour as entrepreneurs is driven by our…  Brain organization  Emotional needs
    5. 5. The Entrepreneurial Personality The Leader I need to be in control The Performer The Visionary I need to be recognized I need to be perceptive © Striving Styles® Personality System
    6. 6. Personality & the Brain
    7. 7. Entrepreneurial Personality  Visionary/Future oriented  Thrive on chaos  Competitive  Confident, risk-takers  Externally focused, action oriented  Full of life, energy & optimism  Determination & can-do attitude
    8. 8. Entrepreneurial Personality  In perpetual growth mode (growth for the sake of growth itself)  Need for constant stimulation  Quick fix problem solving  Inability to tolerate frustration  Don’t consider (or don’t care about) the impact of their style on employees or the chaos they create  Low interpersonal needs
    9. 9. Entrepreneurial Personality  Driven to create and run a business in a way that meets your needs  Often at the expense of the business and its growth
    10. 10. Leadership systems that create powerful companies 5 Reasons Why Entrepreneurial Businesses Fail to Grow
    11. 11. Entrepreneurial Mindset  Equate personal success & competence with money  Self-esteem tied in with growth of business  Become anxious, deflated when they stop focusing on growth & wealth creation  Don’t want to lead, coach or mentor their people as it doesn’t give them intrinsic satisfaction #1
    12. 12. Inhibited by Self-Image  Self-image is one of success & competence  Need to be recognized; to distinguish themselves  See themselves as having everything they need to be successful  Fail to develop business IQ  Don’t listen to what they are being told; fail to accept aspects of reality if they conflict with their vision or self-image #2
    13. 13. Dislike of Hierarchy  Enjoy the camaraderie of the start up business; fail to put in systems, structure or reporting relationships  Don’t like to impose their agenda on others  Believe everyone has similar need for autonomy & fail to correct or tell employees how they want things done  Uncomfortable using their position power  Create chaos & disorder in the business & relationships #3
    14. 14. Driven by Own Needs  Success = money = need for recognition met  Need for recognition keeps them growing the business without a foundation  Fail to consider the needs of employees in the pursuit of getting their needs net  Fail to empathize or care about employee experience  Competitive: their need to distinguish themselves & be better than others stops them from making real connections with people #4
    15. 15. Low Tolerance for Frustration  Impulse control not well developed  Impatience for success causes them to move to market before they are ready  Will fire people without helping them be successful  Will leave their business when they hit a crisis of growth  Become unsettled with anything that slows them down #5
    16. 16. Leadership systems that create powerful companies Stages of Organizational Growth … in an Entrepreneurial Business
    17. 17. Stages of Growth in an Entrepreneurial Business  Businesses grow through stages with distinct needs  Entrepreneur & business need to grow & mature through each stage  Passage from stage to stage marked by crisis points  Nature & characteristics of the entrepreneurial personality can get in the way of growth of business
    18. 18. From Infancy to Adolescence  Everything & everyone dependent on the Entrepreneur  Familial, informal environment with no hierarchy  Externally (sales & market) focused  Youthful feelings, anything is possible  All consuming state of complete engagement with creating the business  Want the feelings of this stage to go on & on Stage 1
    19. 19. From Infancy to Adolescence  All activity focused on how to get the product or service to market  Entrepreneur is at the hub of all activity  Freedom given to all employees to self-manage  Build culture as the ideal place they would like to work in Stage 1
    20. 20. Crisis of Growth & Stuck Point  Growth of the business leads to:  increase of internal chaos, acting out & dysfunctions  conflict due to lack of boundaries, role definitions or organizational structures  increased employee turnover  no longer “high” on business  feel powerless in own business Stage 1
    21. 21. Shall I Stay or Shall I Go? GO  Many entrepreneurs keep their business at this stage for many years  not prepared to change their own behavior  Fantasize about selling the business & moving on  decide to get the business ready to sell  generally not enough of an infrastructure to be saleable Stage 1
    22. 22. Shall I Stay or Shall I Go? STAY  Decide to be a leader, not just an entrepreneur  Realize how your lack of business IQ causes issues & get coaching, training, etc  Prepare to share leadership & decision making  Create some systems & processes Stage 1 A body without bones will flop…. So will a business without a sound structure.
    23. 23. From Adolescence to Adulthood  2 tiered leadership model  Entrepreneur grows the business  Business manager or team for people, financial & systems  Try to keep hierarchy flat  Top down planning  Some infrastructure Stage 2 Entrepreneur Business Manager Employees
    24. 24. From Adolescence to Adulthood  Time freed up to continue growing the business  Permissive with employees, say yes without thinking of consequences  May have two sets of rules: one for you and the other for everyone else  Increase in wealth creates image driven spending Stage 2
    25. 25. Crisis of Growth & Stuck Point  Growth of the business leads to:  bottlenecks in the decision making process  us & them mentality; power struggles; high turnover  employees feel stifled, disempowered  unpredictably, chaos, confusion  feel like the “bad guy” instead of the “hero” in your own business Stage 2
    26. 26. Shall I Stay or Shall I Go? GO  Entrepreneur wants out of the business  hiring a manager has not solved the problem  not willing to delegate more authority  upset with employees  Seeks professional help to audit business  Gets business ready for sale  Already looking for other opportunities Stage 2
    27. 27. Shall I Stay or Shall I Go? STAY  Revisit business hierarchy: delegate authority  Separate own from business identity  Recognize the importance of the employee experience to the growth of the business  Seek professional help to build a professional organization Stage 2 Behavior, systems & processes must be aligned to a single identity to move ahead. Business Identity
    28. 28. Adulthood  Business entity defined  Entrepreneur has clearly defined role  Hierarchy, standards, processes & reporting  Authority distributed throughout hierarchy Stage 3
    29. 29. Adulthood  Entrepreneur looks for opportunities to expand, innovate, acquire & grow  Not involved in day-to-day business management  Leadership team in place  Defined systems throughout the organization Stage 3
    30. 30. Crisis of Growth & Stuck Point  Growth of the business leads to:  chaos due to fast growth without considering the impact on people or readying the business  inexperienced managers making decisions autonomously  confusion of employees as to who is in charge  lack of communication systems lead to silos Stage 3
    31. 31. Shall I Stay or Shall I Go? GO  Entrepreneur satisfied with how far the business has come  trusts leadership team to run the business  not enough challenge  excited about another venture  Hires person to take his place  Establishes Board of Directors Stage 3
    32. 32. Shall I Stay or Shall I Go? STAY  Invest in employees, the business & yourself  Conduct leadership audit & gap analysis  Create a change plan for strengthening your business: align people, behavior & practices  Build relationships & trust with employees Stage 3 You know the value of investing in your business to increase bottom line results
    33. 33. Maturity  Effective meetings, communications, & issue resolution  Use of informal social networks amongst employees  Clear expectations lead to increased productivity & financial results  Energy put into the employee experience increases engagement  Leaders spending more time leading and less time doing Stage 4
    34. 34. Maturity  Low employee turnover with a committed workforce  Top talent attracted to business because of reputation  Employees are in roles that meet their needs and match their strengths and interests  Alignment of energy & focus on collective vision  Success factors identified, managed & achieved Stage 4
    35. 35. Leadership systems that create powerful companies Navigating the Stages in Your Own Business
    36. 36. Navigating the Stages…  Identify what stage you business is at  Examine whether you want to stay or go  Determine what you need to do to get to the next stage  Make investments, as you would into assets  Get the support and expertise you need
    37. 37. Navigating the Stages… Greatest challenges for the entrepreneur  Waking up to what you business actually needs  Not bailing as soon as it gets too uncomfortable  Stop blaming and complaining  Using true experts despite how they make you feel  Acknowledging your own role in any dysfunction  Invest – both money and your own time
    38. 38. Questions? For more information, contact us: Heather Hilliard hhilliard@caliberleadership.com 416.406.3939 www.CaliberLeadershipSystems.com www.StrivingStyles.com

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