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Social Media and You (for tweeners/teens)
Social Media and You (for tweeners/teens)
Social Media and You (for tweeners/teens)
Social Media and You (for tweeners/teens)
Social Media and You (for tweeners/teens)
Social Media and You (for tweeners/teens)
Social Media and You (for tweeners/teens)
Social Media and You (for tweeners/teens)
Social Media and You (for tweeners/teens)
Social Media and You (for tweeners/teens)
Social Media and You (for tweeners/teens)
Social Media and You (for tweeners/teens)
Social Media and You (for tweeners/teens)
Social Media and You (for tweeners/teens)
Social Media and You (for tweeners/teens)
Social Media and You (for tweeners/teens)
Social Media and You (for tweeners/teens)
Social Media and You (for tweeners/teens)
Social Media and You (for tweeners/teens)
Social Media and You (for tweeners/teens)
Social Media and You (for tweeners/teens)
Social Media and You (for tweeners/teens)
Social Media and You (for tweeners/teens)
Social Media and You (for tweeners/teens)
Social Media and You (for tweeners/teens)
Social Media and You (for tweeners/teens)
Social Media and You (for tweeners/teens)
Social Media and You (for tweeners/teens)
Social Media and You (for tweeners/teens)
Social Media and You (for tweeners/teens)
Social Media and You (for tweeners/teens)
Social Media and You (for tweeners/teens)
Social Media and You (for tweeners/teens)
Social Media and You (for tweeners/teens)
Social Media and You (for tweeners/teens)
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Social Media and You (for tweeners/teens)

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Made for Girls Retreat on Wisdom Conference (http://www.uvu.edu/wsc/grow/) held June 14, 2012. Target audience is tweeners and early teens. The idea is not to discourage social media but to explain …

Made for Girls Retreat on Wisdom Conference (http://www.uvu.edu/wsc/grow/) held June 14, 2012. Target audience is tweeners and early teens. The idea is not to discourage social media but to explain the role it plays and encourage wise decisions.

Published in: Education, Technology, Business
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  • 1. SOCIAL MEDIA AND YOUDR. ANNE ARENDT 1
  • 2. FOR STARTERS: A VIDEO AND A LINK Did You Know 4.0 (YouTube 4:46) This presentation and much more (including all references) can be found at:http://www.ourdeskdrawer.com/presentations/ grow-social-media/ 2
  • 3. FOR STARTERS: WE DO NOT DOMINATENorth America has the greatest worldwide Internet penetration rates,with 78.3% of all North Americans having direct local access to theInternet.The greatest number of Internet users, however, come from Asia,whose population constitutes 44.8% of all Internet users worldwide(Internet World Stats, 2010).The five countries with the highest number of Internet users for2012 are: • China (22.5% of world users), • United States (10.8%), • India (5.3%), • Japan (4.4%), and • Brazil (3.6%)(Internet World Stats, 2012b). 3
  • 4. YOUR PARENTS DIDN’T EXPERIENCE ITLet‟s consider how long social media resources have beenaround: • Wikipedia (online encyclopedia) 2001; • del.icio.us (social bookmarking) 2003; • MySpace 2003 (social networking); • Facebook (social networking) 2004; • Flikr (social media) 2004; • Bebo (social networking) 2005; and • YouTube (social media) 2005(Higher Education Academy and the Joint Information Systems Committee 2009). 4
  • 5. CHANGING THE WORLDCompare countries and their internet use: Global Internet Usageby Google(let‟s check by number of users and then by percentage ofpopulation and chat about the difference) 5
  • 6. CHANGING THE WORLDIt is true though that the English language dominates 6
  • 7. AS A WORLD WHAT ARE WE USING?Let‟s check these out:Top 15 SocialTechnology sitesTop 500 Sites UsedGlobally on the WebIt is true thatFacebook dominatesglobally 7
  • 8. WHAT ABOUT CELL PHONES?Mobile Cellular Phone Subscriptions per 100 people (GooglePublic Data)View Global Cell Users (CIA World Factbook)And in the U.S. 8
  • 9. WHAT ABOUT CELL PHONES?Yeah, so what? Lots of people have phones. Ah, but look at howwe use them: 9
  • 10. WHAT DO CELL PHONES HAVE TO DOWITH ANYTHING?83% of U.S. adults have a cell phone ofsome kind, and that 42% of them own asmartphone. That translates into 35% ofall adults(Pew Research Center, 2011). 10
  • 11. WHAT DO CELL PHONES HAVE TO DOWITH ANYTHING?1.2 billion users worldwide -- 82% of theworld‟s internet population over the age of15 -- now log on to a social networks.Facebook, the third largest web propertyonline, is king of all social networks.Visits to Facebook accounted for one inevery seven minutes internet users spentonline in October and 75% of all time spenton all social networks.(AFP Relaxnews, 2011). 11
  • 12. WHAT DO CELL PHONES HAVE TO DOWITH ANYTHING?Close to 65%of all smartphone users inthe US visited a social network inOctober;Two in five used their mobile device toconnect to a social network nearly everyday(AFP Relaxnews, 2011). 12
  • 13. OF COURSE WE ALSO USE COMPUTERSNearly seven in ten (69%)teens ages 12-17 have acomputer. Teens fromwealthier families earningmore than $75,000 a year areslightly more likely (74%) thanless well-off teens topersonally have a desktop orlaptop computer. Older teensare also more likely to reportowning a desktop or laptop;73% of 14-17 year olds havea computer while 60% of 12and 13 year olds do. 13
  • 14. WE USE BOTH TO GO ONLINE 14
  • 15. AND UTAH GOES ONLINE A LOT 15
  • 16. AND THAT IS CHANGING EVERYTHINGGeekologie chart of what occurs every 60 seconds on the InternetLet‟s just consider YouTube a moment: • 60 hours of video are uploaded every minute, or one hour of video is uploaded to YouTube every second. • Over 4 billion videos are viewed a day • Over 800 million unique users visit YouTube each month • Over 3 billion hours of video are watched each month on YouTube • More video is uploaded to YouTube in one month than the 3 major US networks created in 60 years • 70% of YouTube traffic comes from outside the US; YouTube is localized in 39 countries and across 54 languages • In 2011, YouTube had more than 1 trillion views or almost 140 views for every person on Earth 16
  • 17. EVEN HOW WE SHARE THINGS• One third of U.S. adults are more comfortable sharing information online than in person and• One in five admits to sharing false information online• 27 percent of U.S. adults admit to having a different personality online than in person• If it wasnt for the ability to share and consume information online via mobile devices, nearly half of U.S. adults (46%) feel they would not know what is happening with their family and friends.• 85% of all U.S. adults share information online(Hansen, 2012). 17
  • 18. WE HAVE COME TO DEPEND ON IT• 39% of Americans spend more time socializing online compared to face-to-face, more than in the U.K. (36%) and Germany (35%), according to a study by Badoo.• Aside from feelings of loneliness, the survey revealed that people could embellish the truth when sharing online, perhaps to appear more interesting to others, or to "control" their online persona.• 25% of American respondents admit they have exaggerated or lied about who theyve met or what theyve done on their social networks, with a staggering 39% having shared bad news, such as a death or divorce(Thompson, 2012). 18
  • 19. BUT THAT’S THE GROWN UPS, ISN’T IT?Myth: Teens are the biggest gamers of allReality: Teens (12-17 years of age) account for just 23%of the console audience and less than 10% of PC gameminutes(Nielsen, 2009)Today, 8-18 year-olds devote an average of 7 hours and38 minutes to using entertainment media across atypical day (more than 53 hours a week), and becausethey spend so much of that time „media multitasking‟they actually manage to pack a total of 10 hours and 45minutes worth of media content into those 7½ hours(Kaiser Family Foundation, 2009) 19
  • 20. BUT THAT’S THE GROWN UPS, ISN’T IT? 20
  • 21. BUT THAT’S THE GROWN UPS, ISN’T IT? 21
  • 22. BUT THAT’S THE GROWN UPS, ISN’T IT? 22
  • 23. CONSIDERING FACEBOOK79% of American adults said they used the internet and nearlyhalf of adults (47%), or 59% of internet users, say they use atleast one social networking siteThis is close to double the 26% of adults (34% of internet users)who used a SNS in 2008.Among other things, this means the average age of adult-SNSusers has shifted from 33 in 2008 to 38 in 2010.Over half of all adult SNS users are now over the age of 35.Some 56% of SNS users now are female. 23
  • 24. CONSIDERING FACEBOOK92% of SNS users are on Facebook; 29% use MySpace, 18%used LinkedIn and 13% use Twitter.52% of Facebook users and 33% of Twitter users engage with theplatform daily, while only 7% of MySpace and 6% of LinkedInusers do the same.On Facebook on an average day: • 15% of Facebook users update their own status. • 22% comment on another‟s post or status. • 20% comment on another user‟s photos. • 26% “Like” another user‟s content. • 10% send another user a private message(Hampton, Goulet, Rainie, & Purcell, 2011). 24
  • 25. BUT THAT’S ADULTS AGAIN, ISN’T IT?For 8 to 18 year olds in theU.S., top online activitiesinclude: social networking (:22a day), playing games (:17),and visiting video sites suchas YouTube (:15).Three-quarters (74%) of all7th-12th graders say theyhave a profile on a socialnetworking site(Kaiser Family Foundation, 2010b). 25
  • 26. WHAT YOU DO NOW CAN AFFECT YOURFUTUREWhen you put something on a social media site, thatcontent is usually owned by that web site.Even if you delete or hide the content it is likely stillthereand it will likely stay there.Plus, other people may have copied it or reposted itand then you have no control at all 26
  • 27. HOW THIS COULD AFFECT YOUEMPLOYMENT AND EMPLOYER ISSUES"There is no federal law explicitly preventing potentialemployers from asking for Facebook passwords. Employersmay even be able to ask for passwords of currentemployees."(Raymond Law Group LLC, 2012)."One state is banning the practice, and at least 10 otherstates have bills that have been introduced. A few courtshave ruled that such requests violate the federal StoredCommunications Act, but the US Supreme Court has notaddressed this issue. This legal uncertainty leaves manyworkers on shaky legal ground"(Bennett-Smith, 2012). 27
  • 28. THINGS TO DO (WITH YOUR PARENTS HELP)1. Try looking yourself up every once in a while (such as www.pipl.com or www.spokeo.com)2. Dont trust privacy settings3. Avoid negativity4. Internet conversations are (somewhat) indelible (not able to be removed)5. Be careful what you share6. It is OK to unfriend(Barrett-Poindexter, 2012) 28
  • 29. DON’T BELIEVE EVERYTHINGAbout 7.5 million active Facebook users are lying about their age -theyre younger than 13. And among those preteens, more than 5million are under 10.Remember, 39% of Americans spend more time socializing onlinecompared to face-to-face but people could embellish the truthwhen sharing online, perhaps to appear more interesting toothers, or to "control" their online persona.Again, 25% of American respondents admit they haveexaggerated or lied about who theyve met or what theyve doneon their social networks, with a staggering 39% having sharedbad news, such as a death or divorce(Thompson, 2012) 29
  • 30. DON’T BELIEVE EVERYTHING“Social fakes” are invented profiles on socialmedia (often referred to as profilemisrepresentation), which can be used toharass or mock victims anonymously.But the more lucrative fake profile is one thatimitates a legitimate business, damaging thatbusiness‟s online reputation(Siciliano, 2011) 30
  • 31. DON’T BELIEVE EVERYTHINGThe most common crime complaints in the U.S. for 2010: • Non-delivery payment/merchandise 14.4% • FBI-related scams 13.2% • Identity theft 9.8% • Computer crimes 9.1% • Miscellaneous fraud 8.6% • Advance fee fraud 7.6% • Spam 6.9% • Auction fraud 5.9% • Credit card fraud 5.3% • Overpayment fraud 5.3%(Internet Crime Complaint Center, 2010) 31
  • 32. LET’S CHAT ABOUT A FEW THINGSHow credible is information on line? How timely? How accurate?When is one more important than the other?What information should be private?Who can choose to share information about you?Are there generational differences in how we see privacy?At what point can or should a service such as Twitter or Facebookrelease your interaction information? To whom should theyrelease it? How about when potential employers look up yourinformation while deciding if they want to interview you? 32
  • 33. LET’S CHAT ABOUT A FEW THINGSShould social technology/media sites be blocked at work? Howabout at school? How about at the public library?Is a virtual conversation or friendship online as valuable as oneface-to-face?Is texting really conversation?What is a friend?Do we have better or worse writing and reading skills due toonline communication? 33
  • 34. CONCLUSION Use social media. It, in itsmany flavors, is a great tool. However, use it wisely. 34
  • 35. THANK YOU for your time, attention, and participation! Dr. Anne Arendt Technology Management Utah Valley University Anne.arendt@uvu.edu Files will always be available at:http://www.ourdeskdrawer.com/presentations/ grow-social-media/ 35

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