Game Design Thinking for the Enterprise

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  • Champlain College, Rochester native, Professor Communication & Creative Media,
  • Collaboration is a keystone of the Emergent Media Center. We partner with organizations local and international – from the State Archeologist to the United Nations to create emergent media forms and solutions. The collaborative production series provides the student & our partners with skills, by having the students apply next gen thinking to change generating projects with EMC partners.
  • Collaboration is a keystone of the Emergent Media Center. We partner with organizations local and international – from the State Archeologist to the United Nations to create emergent media forms and solutions. The collaborative production series provides the student & our partners with skills, by having the students apply next gen thinking to change generating projects with EMC partners.
  • Jane McGonigal: Lost Ring Olympics Seriosty: Attent ranking email, reducing clutter Teletrust: training teleworking behavior IBM: innov8 IBM Business Process Management (BPM) simulation game, gives both IT and business players a better understanding of how effective BPM impacts an entire business ecosystem. INNOV8 also demonstrates how a more instrumented, interconnected and intelligent world supports process improvements and working smarter to help build a smarter planet.
  • Inclusion, safety
  • Bio
  • Bio
  • Applying game strategies to business goals are successful because they call on our human-ness. As Mark Metris president of Digital Chocolate - a casual, social game company - has stated “Games have the potential to tap into the full range of human emotions and motivate a wide range of behaviors.”That’s the value proposition of utilizing game mechanics - motivating behaviors. To engage the audience, choose specific behaviors defined to support the organization’s goals, and then plan games that will motivate people to reach those goals.
  • The game system allows the player to enter the Magic Circle. To do so a game first requires pre-determined rules and player roles. What side is the player on, what are they allowed to do or not do, and what is the central challenge or conflict? There needs to be an ultimate goal to the play that is reached by overcoming obstacles. “Toys” are incorporated into games and are tools or places for investigation. Built off of simulations, they allow the player the opportunity to customize, problem solve, & achieve mastery. Puzzles, mini-games, vehicles, and implements such as racing cars or swords are examples of game “toys”. Rewards and scores help the player keep track of their performance and motivate them to achieve more. Games balance difficulty of play against time to master - balancing frustration levels against boredom. Fun is the outcome of this balance.
  • When children play games they are constantly adjusting and modifying the rules and the game characters or roles. When their game gets out-of-balance and seems weighted unfairly towards one player, conflict arises. When a player of an electronic game discovers that a game is weighted unfairly or that the difficulty is not in line with the achievement or rewards, the player often loses interest and quits the game. Games keep their player engaged by adjusting difficulty upwards in line with the mastery the player achieves through repetition. This is called in game lingo “leveling up”.
  • Let’s imagine a game that might be used to broadcast an event. We start by setting a goal for the game experience: Here, to simply build an online community for an event. We then identify behaviors that the player would engage in to support that goal. Here, these include joining the group; sharing profile information; participating in online discussions via posting comments or uploading photos; returning to the site and following its development; sharing with friends; and ultimately attending the event. Some of these behaviors could extend beyond the event as well, but we’ll focus on promotion leading up to the event. Join, get other people to join, attend, participate online and in person
  • Once the behaviors to be encouraged are well defined, we can start to incorporate them into the mechanics and rewards of the game. One of the most basic forms of positive feedback in a game are points. These are best tied to tasks that should be easy to accomplish, such as joining the group online, and other actions that you want to be repeated often, like participating in discussions, returning to the site, and sharing with friends. Badges can be awarded for milestones in the point system, as well as more significant actions, like sharing profile information, participating in a certain number of discussions, or convincing a large number of friends to join the site. Status can also be given to those players that are most actively engaged in the game and hitting the largest accomplishments: those that are participating daily might be identified as leaders, those driving discussion could be provided an opportunity to meet in-person or through private chat with a keynote speaker, and those registered to the live event might be given special identifiers or coupons for a product or service integrated into the event or located nearby. The key to a game system like this is that new challenges need to be added continually to keep audience coming back to the experience. If those additions and refinements are based on user feedback, they are likely to be even more engaging.

Transcript

  • 1. Work and Play Exploring Gamification in the Enterprise. Professor Ann DeMarle Director: Emergent Media Center at Champlain College Emai l: [email_address] Web: http://www.champlain.edu/Emergent-Media-Center.html Artwork: Champlain alumni Dan Peavey [email_address]
  • 2. Game Plan
    • Experience
    • Gamification in the Enterprise
    • Game Design Thinking
    • GDD 200: Game Design
    Artwork: Champlain alumni Dan Peavey [email_address]
  • 3. Experience:
    • Founder, current director Emergent Media Center
    • Founder, current director MFA in Emergent Media
    • Founder of Game Development degrees
    http:// gamestudio.champlain.edu /
  • 4. Emergent Media Center at Champlain College Collaboration is Key Partial Client List: America’s Army game levels ; Brahma Kumaris; City of Burlington-Google Earth; Digital Now; Echo Lake Aquarium & Science Center; Elliott Masie Learning 2007-2009 business games & mobile apps ; Flynn Theater; Ford Foundation Wealth Creation Game ; Governor’s Institute of Vermont in Information Technology; Images and Voices of Hope; JDK/Mamava; Kingbridge Centre: GameChange Summit; IBM Virtual Worlds app & interactive; Massachusetts General Hospital Center for Innovation and Integrative Medicine emergency response training game ; Meeting Professional International games ; Microsoft; Planned Parenthood of New England ipad intake app ; Robert Wood Johnson Foundation-Cystic Fibrosis games , United Nations : BREAKAWAY game , National Endowment for the Humanities — State of Vermont Virtual Archeology Museum social networking interactive . 1. Experience Web: http://www.champlain.edu/Emergent-Media-Center.html
  • 5.
    • Link to video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9SqgHe3cpHw&feature=player_embedded
    Partial Client List: America’s Army game levels; Brahma Kumaris; City of Burlington-Google Earth; Digital Now; Echo Lake Aquarium & Science Center; Elliott Masie Learning 2007-2009 business games & mobile apps; Flynn Theater; Ford Foundation Wealth Creation Game; Governor’s Institute of Vermont in Information Technology; Images and Voices of Hope; JDK/Mamava; Kingbridge Centre: GameChange Summit; IBM Virtual Worlds app & interactive; Massachusetts General Hospital Center for Innovation and Integrative Medicine emergency response training game; Meeting Professional International games; Microsoft; Planned Parenthood of New England ipad intake app; Robert Wood Johnson Foundation-Cystic Fibrosis games, United Nations : BREAKAWAY game, National Endowment for the Humanities — State of Vermont Virtual Archeology Museum social networking interactive. 1. Experience Emergent Media Center at Champlain College Collaboration is Key Web: http://www.champlain.edu/Emergent-Media-Center.html
  • 6. Gamification in the Enterprise
    • The process of applying game design thinking to the business environment .
    Harvard Business Review, May 2008 http://hbr.org/2008/05/leaderships-online-labs/ar/1
  • 7. What Do Games & Work Have in Common? 2. Gamification in the Enterprise
    • Motivation
    • Task Achievement
    • Leadership Skills
    • Continuous Improvement
    • Collaboration
    • Goal Orientation
  • 8. America’s Army 2002: Games Get Serious
    • ..."using computer game technology to provide the public a virtual Soldier experience that was engaging, informative and entertaining."
    • — Col. Casey Wardynski
    EMC’s America’s Army Level: Canyon 2. Gamification in the Enterprise
  • 9. America’s Army 2002: Games Get Serious
    • “ 30% of all Americans age 16 to 24 had a more positive impression of the Army because of the game and, even more amazingly, the game had more impact on recruits than all other forms of Army advertising combined."
    • — David Edery, "Changing the Game: How Video games are Transforming the Future of Business”, 10/08
    EMC’s America’s Army Level: Canyon 2. Gamification in the Enterprise
  • 10. Games Go To Work 2. Gamification in the Enterprise
    • PR, marketing & branding
    • Education & training
    • Human Resources
    • Workshops, team-building & conferences
    • Business applications, processes & systems
  • 11. Game Design Thinking in the Workplace
  • 12. Why Game Design Thinking? Engagement
    • Key Concepts:
    • Magic Circle
    • Flow
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dopamine 3. Game Design Thinking in the Workplace Motivation, Attention, Working Memory & Learning
  • 13. The Magic Circle Johan Huizinga (1872–1945). "Homo Ludens: A Study of the Play-Element in Culture” 3. Game Design Thinking in the Workplace Boundaries
  • 14. The Magic Circle Johan Huizinga (1872–1945). "Homo Ludens: A Study of the Play-Element in Culture” 3. Game Design Thinking in the Workplace Choice Rules Pathways Feedback Empowerment
  • 15. Flow
    • Proposed by Mihály Csíkszentmihályi
    • The mental state of operation in which a person in an activity is fully immersed in a feeling of energized focus, full involvement, and success in the process of the activity.
    3. Game Design Thinking in the Workplace
  • 16.
    • Exploratory & experiential
    • Well ordered problems
    • Cause and effect
    • On demand & in-time learning
    • Cycle of expertise/mastery
    • No failure
    • Try on differing roles
    • Virtual presence
    • Creative expression
    • Borderless community
    • Player has a story to tell
    3. Game Design Thinking in the Workplace Flow & Learning
  • 17. Magic Circle, Flow, & Learning 3. Game Design Thinking in the Workplace
    • Choice
    • Exploratory & experiential
    • Try on differing roles
    • Creative expression
    • Borderless community
    • Rules
    • Well ordered problems
    • Cause and effect
    • Pathways
    • Cycle of expertise/mastery
    • No failure
    • Player has a story to tell
    • Feedback
    • On demand & in-time learning
    • Cause & effect
    • Virtual presence
    Empowering Productivity
  • 18. Characteristics & Perceptions of Work & Games 3. Game Design Thinking in the Workplace Source: Gamification WIki: http://gamification.org/Gamification of Work
  • 19. 3. Game Design Thinking in the Workplace Areas Game Design Thinking Can Impact Empowering Productivity
  • 20.
    • Source: TJ Keitt’s Blog, Forrester, Product Managers Take Note http://blogs.forrester.com/tj_keitt/10-09-24-product_managers_take_note_microsoft_using_serious_games_product_test_and_you_can_too
    3. Game Design Thinking in the Workplace Microsoft: Games Culture Empowering Productivity
  • 21. GDD201: Game Design
  • 22. Intrinsic & Extrinsic Motivators Engagement, Mastery, Meaning <—> Points, Badges, Leader-boards 4. GDD 201: Game Design
  • 23. Game System Overview:
    • Central conflict or obstacle
    • Goals: Clear Win-lose state
    • Player roles
    • Rules
    • Multiple pathways to goal
    • Levels of difficulty and achievement
    • Player Feedback: Rewards
    4. GDD 201: Game Design
  • 24.
    • Achievers: driven by in-game goals, usually some form of points gathering - whether experience points, levels, or money.
    • Explorers: driven to find out as much as they can about the game.
    • Socializers : converse & role-play with fellow gamers.
    • Killers: cause distress, thrive on competition.
    Understanding the Player — Richard Bartles Four 4. GDD 201: Game Design
  • 25.
    • Agon : Games of competition & conflict
    • Alea: Games of chance & “fate”
    • Mimicry: Games of simulation & copying
    • Ilinx: Games of vertigo & reckless abandon
    Game Conflict or Obstacle: Basic Game Types — Roger Caillios 4. GDD 201: Game Design
  • 26.
    • Physical Challenges
      • Speed & reaction time (twitch games)
      • Accuracy & precision (steering & shooting)
      • Timing & rhythm (dance games)
      • Learning special moves (fighting games)
      • Races
    • Logical challenges (puzzles)
      • Based on underlying goal
      • Time
    • Exploration Challenges
      • Locked doors & traps
      • Mazes & illogical spaces
    • Conflict
      • Strategy, tactics, & logistics
      • Survival & reduction of enemy forces
      • Defending vulnerable items or units
      • Stealth
    • Economic Challenges
      • Accumulating wealth or points
      • Efficient Manufacturing
      • Achieving balance or stability in a system
      • Caring for living things in a system
    • Conceptual Challenges
      • Understanding something new
      • Deduction, observation, interpretation
      • Detective games offer conceptual challenges
    4. GDD 201: Game Design Central Game Conflicts
  • 27.
    • Points, badges, status but also advantage:
      • Get ahead in a race, more likely to get power-ups or special scores
      • In Monopoly–get houses, more likely to get even more money
      • Churned up water in swimming races slows down followers
    4. GDD 201: Game Design Player Feedback: Rewards
  • 28.
    • An achievement that makes subsequent achievements more difficult
      • Gold is heavy, slows you down
      • Upkeep costs
    • Increase the impact of chance—if chance is fair, it helps as much as hurts!
    • Define victory in non-numeric ways — chess isn’t won by taking the most pieces.
    • Increase the difficulty level as feedback kicks in.
    4. GDD 201: Game Design Player Feedback: Negative
  • 29. Creating Successful Routes for Engagement
    • Define the goal for the player that supports the business objective
    • Assign roles ( behaviors ), utilize community
    • Drive behavior through awarding points, badges, levels, leader boards
    • Layer participation by offering leveled tasks : beginner, middle, master
    • Balance difficulty : short term—long-term
    • Align largest rewards with most difficult tasks —project goal
    • For sustained engagement: feed the system c onstantly add, test, & refine.
    4. GDD 201: Game Design
  • 30. Example: Goal—build an online community for an event
    • Player Behaviors:
    • Join group
    • Share profile information
    • Participate in discussions: post comments, upload photos
    • Return to site, follow
    • Share with friends
    • Attend event
    4. GDD 201: Game Design
  • 31. Example: Reward System—build an online community
    • Mechanics: Point Rewards
    • Join group
    • Participate in discussions: post comments, upload photos
    • Return to site, follow
    • Share with friends
    • Mechanics: Badges
    • Point milestones
    • Share profile information
    • Participate in discussions: post comments, upload photos
    • Accomplishments like 100 friends join site
    • Status
    • Participating daily
    • Leading discussions: meet with keynote
    • Register for event: coupons
    • Feed the system constantly add, test, and refine
    4. GDD 201: Game Design
  • 32.
    • “ Games have the potential to tap into the full range of human emotions & motivate a wide range of behaviors.”
    Questions? Professor Ann DeMarle Director: Emergent Media Center at Champlain College Emai l: [email_address] Web: http ://www.champlain.edu/Emergent-Media-Center.html — Mark Metis, president Digital Chocolate