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Game Design Thinking for the Enterprise
 

Game Design Thinking for the Enterprise

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  • Champlain College, Rochester native, Professor Communication & Creative Media,
  • Collaboration is a keystone of the Emergent Media Center. We partner with organizations local and international – from the State Archeologist to the United Nations to create emergent media forms and solutions. The collaborative production series provides the student & our partners with skills, by having the students apply next gen thinking to change generating projects with EMC partners.
  • Collaboration is a keystone of the Emergent Media Center. We partner with organizations local and international – from the State Archeologist to the United Nations to create emergent media forms and solutions. The collaborative production series provides the student & our partners with skills, by having the students apply next gen thinking to change generating projects with EMC partners.
  • Jane McGonigal: Lost Ring Olympics Seriosty: Attent ranking email, reducing clutter Teletrust: training teleworking behavior IBM: innov8 IBM Business Process Management (BPM) simulation game, gives both IT and business players a better understanding of how effective BPM impacts an entire business ecosystem. INNOV8 also demonstrates how a more instrumented, interconnected and intelligent world supports process improvements and working smarter to help build a smarter planet.
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  • Applying game strategies to business goals are successful because they call on our human-ness. As Mark Metris president of Digital Chocolate - a casual, social game company - has stated “Games have the potential to tap into the full range of human emotions and motivate a wide range of behaviors.”That’s the value proposition of utilizing game mechanics - motivating behaviors. To engage the audience, choose specific behaviors defined to support the organization’s goals, and then plan games that will motivate people to reach those goals.
  • The game system allows the player to enter the Magic Circle. To do so a game first requires pre-determined rules and player roles. What side is the player on, what are they allowed to do or not do, and what is the central challenge or conflict? There needs to be an ultimate goal to the play that is reached by overcoming obstacles. “Toys” are incorporated into games and are tools or places for investigation. Built off of simulations, they allow the player the opportunity to customize, problem solve, & achieve mastery. Puzzles, mini-games, vehicles, and implements such as racing cars or swords are examples of game “toys”. Rewards and scores help the player keep track of their performance and motivate them to achieve more. Games balance difficulty of play against time to master - balancing frustration levels against boredom. Fun is the outcome of this balance.
  • When children play games they are constantly adjusting and modifying the rules and the game characters or roles. When their game gets out-of-balance and seems weighted unfairly towards one player, conflict arises. When a player of an electronic game discovers that a game is weighted unfairly or that the difficulty is not in line with the achievement or rewards, the player often loses interest and quits the game. Games keep their player engaged by adjusting difficulty upwards in line with the mastery the player achieves through repetition. This is called in game lingo “leveling up”.
  • Let’s imagine a game that might be used to broadcast an event. We start by setting a goal for the game experience: Here, to simply build an online community for an event. We then identify behaviors that the player would engage in to support that goal. Here, these include joining the group; sharing profile information; participating in online discussions via posting comments or uploading photos; returning to the site and following its development; sharing with friends; and ultimately attending the event. Some of these behaviors could extend beyond the event as well, but we’ll focus on promotion leading up to the event. Join, get other people to join, attend, participate online and in person
  • Once the behaviors to be encouraged are well defined, we can start to incorporate them into the mechanics and rewards of the game. One of the most basic forms of positive feedback in a game are points. These are best tied to tasks that should be easy to accomplish, such as joining the group online, and other actions that you want to be repeated often, like participating in discussions, returning to the site, and sharing with friends. Badges can be awarded for milestones in the point system, as well as more significant actions, like sharing profile information, participating in a certain number of discussions, or convincing a large number of friends to join the site. Status can also be given to those players that are most actively engaged in the game and hitting the largest accomplishments: those that are participating daily might be identified as leaders, those driving discussion could be provided an opportunity to meet in-person or through private chat with a keynote speaker, and those registered to the live event might be given special identifiers or coupons for a product or service integrated into the event or located nearby. The key to a game system like this is that new challenges need to be added continually to keep audience coming back to the experience. If those additions and refinements are based on user feedback, they are likely to be even more engaging.

Game Design Thinking for the Enterprise Game Design Thinking for the Enterprise Presentation Transcript