DeMarle-MFAEmergent Media at Champlain College
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Presentation on the implications of technology, the communications landscape and how the MFA at Champlain College in Emergent Media prepares a student for it.

Presentation on the implications of technology, the communications landscape and how the MFA at Champlain College in Emergent Media prepares a student for it.

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  • Welcome\n
  • you can ...\n
  • create images, reflect, post a blog\n
  • or publish a book\n
  • you can design its cover\n
  • or its interface\n
  • with your cell phone you can\n
  • capture the moment, or take a video and use it as your mantle\n
  • you can post and share or you can design a an app or a game \n
  • with a game you can engage\n
  • or teach\n
  • \n
  • or work to save lives\n
  • Its all due to the exponential returns from engineering: impacting speed, portability and connectivity.\n\nGordon Moore (Chairman of Intel) was dead on in his prediction named for him Moore’s Law which described the exponential increase in speed of due to advancements in silicon transistor technology. And as Moore’s Law comes to an end, researchers are moving molecules, investigating nanotubes and other concepts incomprehensible only a short while ago to create new computing technologies.\n\n
  • Likewise the rapid rise of network capabilities first impacting computer, then the internet and now mobile devices. \n\nThese are due to the thin film semiconductors behind flexible or wearable computers, large-area high-resolution displays to the electronic paper of our nooks and kindles.\n\nWhat this means to us is the emergent means to distribute, display, interact and create new layered media and experiences in anyplace.\n
  • Futurist Ray Kurzweil has stated…(read from above “So we won't experience 100 years of progress in the 21st century—it will be more like 20,000 years of progress”) \nSo looking at the next 100 years based upon the advances of the last, what can you envision?\nWe’ve gone from this old TV TO MOVIES ON DEMAND ON OUR MOBILE DEVICES and our platforms have become cheaper and with more functions. That’s the challenge set out to our MFA grad students.\n
  • Futurist Ray Kurzweil has stated…(read from above “So we won't experience 100 years of progress in the 21st century—it will be more like 20,000 years of progress”) \nSo looking at the next 100 years based upon the advances of the last, what can you envision?\nWe’ve gone from this old TV TO MOVIES ON DEMAND ON OUR MOBILE DEVICES and our platforms have become cheaper and with more functions. That’s the challenge set out to our MFA grad students.\n
  • We do know that shifting technology paradigms impact our media and ourselves - They change how we communicate, learn, think , create and work.\n
  • So what’s the impact for us as creators? We’ve entered an emergent space where media is now networked and connected, interactive – in that we can make things happen, its participatory in that groups can do things and change things together. And even better news, the barriers to entry to those with the creativity and the skills are changing as well. The new creative understands both the technology and its implications on culture. With these they can create avenues to reach and engage.\n
  • The advent of newer, cheaper technologies, it has become increasingly easier for us to put a message out into the world and broadcast it globally.\n
  • For example it doesn’t take massive printing presses or expensive TV studios to become a go-to-source for news and opinion anymore. As can be seen by this 2006 example from Technorati ranking readership of news outlets online. The blue representing traditional media, the red – newer blogs.\n(Click)\nAuthenticity, transparency and dynamic content now top mass market media. It means that the individual and the small group has as much say as the mega-mass media producers of old.\n
  • For example it doesn’t take massive printing presses or expensive TV studios to become a go-to-source for news and opinion anymore. As can be seen by this 2006 example from Technorati ranking readership of news outlets online. The blue representing traditional media, the red – newer blogs.\n(Click)\nAuthenticity, transparency and dynamic content now top mass market media. It means that the individual and the small group has as much say as the mega-mass media producers of old.\n
  • As can be seen in this hyper-saturated, networked world, getting attention and simple connectivity is no longer enough. The audience is no longer looking for a single message, image, catch phrase or memorable tune. Connecting is the beginning - but just as easily and quickly, it can become the ending point.\n\n
  • Today’s audience is looking for engagement. \nToday’s creative understand this and sees innovation and collaboration as an important part of the new communication landscape. \n
  • They are flexible in their approach to new tools for creation, and embrace the form to fit the purpose. Likewise they are merging forms and inventing new forms of engagement. \n\nAnother key change in our communication landscape is “Participation Bandwidth”. This term refers to the increasing amount of online spaces and tools for creating communities - and our limited time to participate. As it becomes cheaper and easier to share messages it has become increasingly more difficult for the individual to differentiate and to remain loyal. \n\nThe new creative understands this - and creates new means to breakthrough the clutter.\n
  • A good example would be game designer Jane McGonigal who created “The Lost Ring” sponsored by McDonalds as a lead-in to the Beijing Olympics. The Lost Ring was a game played live for 6 months in 2008 by thousands of people across six continents. Players were trying to find a fictional Lost Olympic Ring. Jane and her team posted clues were posted through blogs, via email, instant messaging and through twitter. \nThe Lost Ring is a good example of new ways of reaching large audiences and engaging them through games. McDonald’s spokesperson and chief global marketing officer, Mary Dillion, said of the project “Our goal is really about strengthening our bond with the global youth culture”. \nMcGonigal has dubbed this new reality of engaging the individual as the “economy of engagement”. She has written “In the economy of engagement, it is less and less important to compete for attention, and more and more important to compete for things like brain cycles and interactive bandwidth.”\n\n
  • When we examine the online space we see that In 2010 Americans spent on average 32 hours a month online - roughly an hour a day. ( http://www.comscoredatamine.com/2011/01/average-time-spent-online-per-u-s-visitor-in-2010/ ). As more and more organizations utilize social media for mass media purposes, truly participatory and collaborative media are becoming the holy grail of engagement. \n\nHow are people behaving on line, how do they participate and collaborate? This Business Week chart of data from Forester Research illustrates key online behaviors for differing age groups. What becomes apparent is that the generations that grew up with technology - the digital natives are very active - joining, sharing, creating, reviewing, tagging, and observing. Their efforts influence one another and extend beyond their age groups spilling into older demographics. Non-digital native generations - the digital adopters or TV generation - tend more toward consumptive behavior - following information shared by others but also comment on online content.\nhttp://images.businessweek.com/mz/07/24/0724_6insiid_a.gif\n
  • Social networks and games are proving to be a very powerful pull for online participation. June 2010 a Nielsen report showed that social networks and online games were the dominant forms of internet activity. Looking closely at the Nielsen report, the top five online activities share in common the behavior of active feedback. In this “engagement economy”, the first step to harnessing individual "participation bandwidth" is to create active avenues for user experience. This is where the expertise of design comes in.\n
  • The MFA is designed for this new media landscape. It is built upon the need in media today to bring together creative individuals from differing domains, who are highly motivated with a willingness to dive deeply and to collaborate across fields and offer critical feedback to create and refine truly new media experiences and platforms.\n
  • And when they work together, they discover MAGIC HAPPENS\nAnd it comes down to a simple formula code plus content. Students in the MFA learn to balance, work within, and create both.\n
  • Depending on what you embrace while at Champlain - matched to who you are, and your motivation, the MFA in Emergent Media can prepares you to enter these career paths & others yet to be created. \nREAD LIST\nHighlighted are some of our speakers in the MFA speaker series this year.\n
  • To understand how Champlain prepares you for your future, the key touchstone of this degree is innovation. To enable the student to make magic happen the 60 credit curriculum is designed to build practical skills while providing a deep understanding of theory. \n
  • Based on this foundation, in upper level coursework, students create projects both personal and collaborative.\n
  • Specifically the program begins by connecting the student to experts – both at Champlain and out in the professional sphere.\n
  • Through a series of foundational courses such as the Emergent Landscape – an intimate speaker series\n
  • The other foundation courses lay the esthetic, programming, and historical to current theoretical basis for media that you will built upon…\n
  • The student rounds out the skills they need as individuals through 4 self-selected electives chosen from across our undergraduate curriculums and the existing online Masters program.\n
  • The next tier of courses allows the student to marry theory to practice in the form of seminars and studios that explore relevant principles and emerging understandings that can impact media creation.\n
  • Such as found in the Experience Design: Play & Participation and the Human Experience: Through the Lens of Neuroscience, Education & Business courses.\n
  • These classes can become the test bed and form the framework for ideas and concepts that the student wishes to explore in depth in their final year. One course I’m particularly thrilled about is People, Place, & Community – this year we are working with the Flynn Theater and other groups to apply our knowledge & skills to their challenges. Likewise the student may choose a community that they wish to enable through technology.\n
  • As important as guidance from experts is the collaborative experience of other students in the program. In crafting each class during the selection process, we look for a diverse group of students with a range of talents & expertise. This years’ cohort is an amazing group of individuals coming from communications, technology and science, graphic design, game design, video, dance to name a few. \n
  • Creating a collaborative environment through these classes, MFA students form the essential component of critical friends providing feedback that strengthens eventual project outcomes.\nPuzzles & Prototypes – a studio and seminar - is one such class where working with peers transforms the work and the learning.\n
  • Collaboration is a keystone of the Emergent Media Center where the MFA is housed. We’ve partnered with organizations local and international – from the State Archeologist to the United Nations to create emergent media forms and solutions. The collaborative production series provides the student with skills, by having the MFA students work on change generating projects with the partners & undergraduates at the Emergent Media Center,…\n
  • These courses in Collaborative Production build the MFA students technical and esthetic skills but as important build the skills for creating, working on, and managing large media productions.\n1. Business goals & production: needs analysis, cost, capacity, value, budget implications, project planning, iteration, production, \n2. Qualitative and quantitative research: users' behaviors, attitudes and expectations,\n3. Creative and technical project leads and project managers\n
  • The curriculum balances collaboration by providing the individual student with the space, the mentoring, and the grounding to develop and explore concepts they choose to further develop.\n
  • Specifically building off of the earlier studios, in the final year the student develops and creates a personal project and supporting thesis argument. This can be done as a solo production OR it can be built by a team.\n
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  • Thank you to Attendees. Turn it over to Brian to moderate questions.\n

Transcript

  • 1. MFA in Emergent MediaCreate. Collaborate. Innovate.
  • 2. Its a GREAT time to be creative
  • 3. Great time to be creative
  • 4. Exponential returns connectivityportability molecules speed
  • 5. Exponential returns networks connectivity"in film trans#tors portability molecules speed
  • 6. The Law of Accelerating Returns “...the history of technology shows that technological change is exponential... So we wont experience 100 years of progress in the 21st century—it will be more like 20,000 years of progress (at todays rate). The "returns," such as chip speed and cost-effectiveness, also increase exponentially. Theres even exponential growth in the rate of exponential growth.” —Ray Kurzweilspeedconnectivityportabilitylower cost
  • 7. The Law of Accelerating Returns “...the history of technology shows that technological change is exponential... So we wont experience 100 years of progress in the 21st century—it will be more like 20,000 years of progress (at todays rate). The "returns," such as chip speed and cost-effectiveness, also increase exponentially. Theres even exponential growth in the rate of exponential growth.” —Ray Kurzweilspeedconnectivityportabilitylower cost
  • 8. The Law of Accelerating Returns “...the history of technology shows that technological change is exponential... So we wont experience 100 years of progress in the 21st century—it will be more like 20,000 years of progress (at todays rate). The "returns," such as chip speed and cost-effectiveness, also increase exponentially. Theres even exponential growth in the rate of exponential growth.” —Ray Kurzweilspeedconnectivityportabilitylower cost ?
  • 9. Shifting technology paradigms impact our mediaChanging how we:Communicate, Learn, Think, Create, Work...
  • 10. Emergent MediaNetworked, interactive, participatory communications.
  • 11. http://technorati.com/weblog/ blogosphere/
  • 12. http://technorati.com/weblog/ blogosphere/
  • 13. http://www.boingboing.net/ http://technorati.com/weblog/ blogosphere/
  • 14. Getting attention isno longer enough.
  • 15. the ging to nga ualE in divid key. ction is a
  • 16. idth ation BandwP articip the ging to nga ual E in divid key. ction is a
  • 17. idth ation Bandw P articip “...it is less and less im portant to compete for attention, and moreand more important to competefor things like brain cy cles andinteractive bandwidth. — Jane McGonigal, “Eng agement Economy” http://janemcgonigal.com /
  • 18. http://images.businessweek.com/mz/07/24/0724_6insiid_a.gif
  • 19. http://blog.nielsen.com/nielsenwire/online_mobile/what-americans-do-online-social-media-and-games-dominate-activity/
  • 20. MFA inEmergentMediaMFA in Emergent MediaCreate. Collaborate. Innovate.
  • 21. “It’s code dude, we can do anything.” —Clint HockingMagic happensCode: provides the possibilitiesContent: evokes the emotional & intellectual experience
  • 22. MFA Career PathsArtist – April Cornell Marketing 3D artist Online Marketing expert– Rich Nadworny Animator Social Media Guru Technical artist Procedural artist Community manager Graphic designer Programmer “Film” maker - Digital video editor Fine art/programming, database programming – Jonathan HarrisExperience designer Writer Interaction designer Content designer Game designer – Randy Smith Narrative designer Mobile media – Justin Siegel Interactive storytellerEntrepreneur & Business Blog journalist - Jerringan Pontiac Innovator – John Abele Technical documentation writer Online communities & news Professor, critic – Frank Lantz Project manager
  • 23. Magic happens ÇÇÉätà|ÉÇTheory Skills
  • 24. Magic happens ÇÇÉätà|ÉÇPersonal Collaborative Projects Theory Skills
  • 25. Connecting andguided by experts...
  • 26. Foundations: connecting to expertsThe Emergent Landscape (visiting lecture series/seminar)Who are the thought leaders in emergent technologies and what are they thinking? Visiting practitioners, entrepreneurs,researchers, and scholars will present their work and concepts in a discussion series on current trends impactingcommunications. Special attention will be given to the origins and evolution of these ideas. Students will market, host and reviewthe series, leading the forum after each presentation. As a group they will select and organize the agenda for the followingsemester’s series.Check out our current speaker series guest and expertise:http://www.champlain.edu/MFA/Emergent-Landscape-Speaker-Series.html
  • 27. Foundations: content, code, and contextFoundations of Digital Image Making (studio)What concepts guide the creation of traditional, time-based, and interactive imagery? What is the function of the digital toolbox?Students explore a variety of tools for creative image making—from drawing and painting to Photoshop, Maya, and Flash—oftenin unexpected combinations. Projects serve as departure points for the discovery and discussion of universal principles ofaesthetics and design. Special emphasis will be given to human factors of perception and interaction and the historical context ofimagery to communicate.Causes of Emergence: Programming Languages (lab and seminar)What is emergence and what role does code have to play in successful applications? The student discovers scripting andprogramming languages with an emphasis on how they enabled application development. Case studies will investigate modelssuch as Google, Voice Over IP, Facebook, World of WarCraft—the languages that were chosen or developed and why. Labs willprovide a platform for exploration of fundamental concepts such as scripting, object oriented programming, event drivenarchitectures and databases.Technology as a Disruptive Force (seminar)In today’s society where our work, fun and personal connections are managedand influenced by technology, have you ever wondered how technology willshape your future? We will explore how technological innovation has beenviewed over time by philosophers, writers and sociologists. Whichperspectives hold true today? What about present-day perspectives? Do youthink they will hold true tomorrow? How do we imagine that society andultimately our place within will be affected day-by-day as technologycontinues to advance?
  • 28. Building Skills: discover potentialThis list is a sampling of suggested graduate and undergraduate courses offered as electives:Management: •Advanced Video Editing •Implementing Web Media•Foundations of IT Management; •Audio Production •Server-side Scripting•Legal and Ethical Issues in Technology; •Advanced Audio Production & Sound Design •Implementing eCommerce Technology•Reflective Leadership and Planned Change. •Cinematography and Lighting •Usability and Design•Legal Issues of Communications •Audio & Digital Editing •Using ASP •Digital Filmmaking I •Applying XSL/XSLTAesthetic: •Digital Filmmaking II •Animation and Interactivity II•Anatomy and Perspective •Video Compositing and Special Effects •C++ Programming I•Level Design •C++ Programming II•Game Technology II Communications: •Data Structures and Algorithms•Conceptual Game Design •Ethics and Communication •Java Systems Development•Intro to 3D Art •Social Interaction in the Digital Age •Systems Analysis and Design•Drawing for Game Development •Legal Issues of Communication •Linux/Unix Programming•Foundations of Concept Painting •Advanced Graphical User Interface•3D Modeling I Computational/Code: Programming•3D Animation •Web Development I •Programming for Mobile Devices•3D Modeling II •Web Development II •Game Technology•3D Game Environments •Relational Databases with Web Applications •Graphics/Game Engine Programming I•Digital Interactive Design •Client-Side Scripting •Graphics/Game Engine Programming II•Digital 2D Motion Graphics •Mastering XHTML & XML •Game Architecture•Video Communication •Animation and Interactivity I •Console Programming
  • 29. Engaging with the world...
  • 30. Deep dive: Theory meets PracticeExperience Design: Play and Participation (seminar)Networks and computational systems are profoundly changing the essential human experience of communication, participation,and play. Design is shifting as control passes from designers to consumers. What underlying characteristics determineengagement and connectivity? How are electronic games and social networks creating new forms to entertain and shape socialspace? Students examine topics that include: computer interfaces as limitations and bridges; identity; participatory media andsocial engagement; mobility; game genres, mechanics, and ecology; and technologies for building games and social networks.The goal is to formulate methodologies for designing interactive experiences that facilitate participation.Our Human Experience: Through the Lens of Neuroscience, Education and Business (seminar)What is identity, how do we learn, what influences decision-making and emotional responses? The answers to these questionspose new insights that can impact the media design. Ongoing research in neuroscience and changing theories in education andbusiness bring new understandings of what guides human behavior. Students examine the impact of mass communications andnewer concepts of online media—such as the collapse of distance, global connectivity, and information delivered in short bursts—on identity and how we process information.
  • 31. Deep dive: Theory meets PracticeHuman Interfaces (studio and seminar)What are the physical and psychological constructs shaping human interaction? Students will discover fundamental interaction,communication, and design concepts through a myriad of perspectives: dance, music, language, crafts, architecture, andengineering. Did mechanical and early computing devices take these into account? Students will explore the evolution ofcomputer interfaces from command line to GUI, from hypertext to hypermedia. Insights gained will be applied to constructingcomputer-mediated environments that support human interaction.Digital Storytelling (studio and seminar)Whether commercially produced or user-generated, storytelling can effectively communicate ideas and construct meaning.Students will explore traditional story structures and how they can find expression in new media and varied outlets–from news,public relations, and advertising–to entertainment, games, and such online venues as websites, blogs and Youtube postings.Examining the Hero’s and the user’s journey in close detail, students will develop an original story concept and execute it throughinteractive and/or time-based media.People, Place & Community (field class)Application and integration of technology in the real world varies from community to community—from the digital display at thegas station to the neighborhood Facebook group. How does computational media impact face-to-face interaction? How can itimprove outreach for groups such as small businesses and non-profits? How can we design interfaces that integrate with thephysical world to create meaning and connection? The student will select a local community and research the challenges facing itand the local technology and connectivity constraints. Assessing this information, the student will propose an emergent mediasolution that is human-centric and responsive to community.
  • 32. Collaboration:Critical Friends
  • 33. Collaborative Production and ÇÇÉätà|ÉÇPuzzles and Prototypes (studio and seminar)Much like a traditional artist creates quick sketches that influence the masterpiece, students will generate rapid prototypes to exploreinteractive solutions and games. Working individually or in teams they will create weekly solutions or iterations to design puzzles posedby current media trends and news events. Prototyping activities will rely on research and testing in the design process. Variousmethods covered will include paper prototyping, mind mapping, participatory design, mini-game format, agile development, etc.Evaluating pros and cons of methods and results, students will learn to match method to scope and complexity of a design problem.
  • 34. Partnering on changegenerating projects...
  • 35. Collaborative Production and ÇÇÉätà|ÉÇCollaborative Production I (studio)In this first of three collaborative production experiences, students identify their strengths, areas for growth, and preferred focuses in mediaproduction. With these in mind, they are selectively chosen to collaborate with faculty, student production teams, and sponsors on EmergentMedia Center supported projects. The student participates in a collaborative process in a professional level project. These collaborativeproject experiences are intended to inform, but not necessarily contribute to the student’s final thesis project. What is the spirit and goal ofthe entrepreneur in emergent media? Focusing on the business goals of a project at the Emergent Media Center, the student will focuson needs analysis, cost, capacity, value, budget implications, project planning, iteration, production, and collaboration in an appliedcontext. The full semester project engagement will emphasize the convergence of business goals, end-user needs, technology, andcollaborative leadership.Collaborative Production Project II (studio)The consumer drives emergent media. To create innovation in this landscape, design and communication needs to begin with anunderstanding of the end-user. Focusing on the goals of a project at the Emergent Media Center, students will conduct qualitative andquantitative research into users behaviors, attitudes and expectations. Likewise, they will conduct secondary research into publishedliterature and other sources. Working with the project team this information will guide the design, production, and testing processes.Collaborative Production Project IIIProducing emergent media forms draws upon the skill sets of a diverse group of talented people. In this final collaborative studiostudents learn to facilitate, manage and implement the creative process. They will take on the roles and responsibilities associated withproject leads and project managers effectively communicating with partners, sponsors and the student production teams. In theseroles students become key decision makers and strengthen abilities in describing strategic creative and production decisions.
  • 36. Individual practice and mentoring
  • 37. Individual Exploration and VÜxtà|ä|àçIntegrative Thesis Project I (studio)Innovation doesn’t spring from a void. Ideas are iterative, changing and emerging over time. In this first of two independentstudios, the student develops a vision by researching a pertinent problem addressable through emergent toolsets and presentingit to the community for ongoing feedback. Through systematic examination, the student will consider social impacts; develop aproject plan; establish goals and objectives; collect and analyze information; and prepare and deliver a conceptual prototypeagreed upon by the student and faculty advisor.Integrative Thesis Project II (studio)Students will complete production and post-production of the project prototyped in Thesis I. They will develop and conduct auser-test of the prototype. Based upon test outcomes and knowledge gained through development; the project plan will be re-evaluated and production will continue. During the final faculty review the student will exhibit and defend the work, submitting awritten thesis.
  • 38. Ken Howell, MFA Faculty21rst Century Skills and Knowledge?
  • 39. How do we think about technology?
  • 40. Creativity is the new pragmatism.
  • 41. Technology extends HUMAN intentions.
  • 42. The ProcessKat Ray,Office of Graduate Admission & CRMkray@champlain.edu1-802-383-6602 Counsel interested students on degrees Link to financial questions, admission process & status updates
  • 43. Program SpecificsOn Campus Full Time Program60 Credits over five semesters-21 monthsApplication Deadline isFebruary 15, 2011,Admission Process Application Form Resume and Statement of Purpose Official Transcripts 3 Letters of Reference Project Post Mortem Graduate Admission Test/Graduate Record Examination (optional)
  • 44. Program FinancingCost: $900 per credit hourFinancial Aid Graduate student aid in the form of lower interest education loans (e.g, Stafford Loans) Limited Graduate Teaching Assistantships & Project Management positions available to qualified full-time students.Financial Aid Assistance Leigh Bouffard, Financial Aid Advisor lbouffard@champlain.edu 1-802-860-2789
  • 45. MFA inEmergentMedia • —Create. Collaborate. Innovate.For more info contact; Kat Ray kray@champlain.edu orAnn DeMarle demarle@champlain.edu