Anna van Someren
                                      New Media Literacies
                                Comparative Me...
re-imagine       re-think
repurpose
                                  re-work
mod                               recombine
...
m ash-ups

            fan videos, vids
m ash-ups

            fan videos, vids
idea of engaging with the dynamic text
        has historical precedent
idea of engaging with the dynamic text
        has historical precedent
idea of engaging with the dynamic text
           has historical precedent




much of our canon of revered literature was...
quot;A man might write the works of others, adding and
changing nothing, in which case he is simply called a
'scribe'(scri...
not new, but easier, faster, more prevalent
The current emphasis on digital remixing makes
visible the degree to which all cultural expression
builds on what has come...
schools still embrace the “lone author”, “artist genius”,
       the myth of the original creative work
schools still embrace the “lone author”, “artist genius”,
       the myth of the original creative work
schools still embrace the “lone author”, “artist genius”,
       the myth of the original creative work




 teachers need...
http://www.pz.harvard.edu/Research/GoodWork.htm
http://www.pz.harvard.edu/Research/GoodWork.htm




HGSE Project Zero: Good Play
  Young People, Ethics, and the New Digit...
Good Play’s
5 ethical categories:
1. identity
2. privacy
3. ownership / authorship
4. credibility
5. participation
Good Play’s
5 ethical categories:
1. identity
2. privacy
3. ownership / authorship
4. credibility
5. participation
if we hold onto the idea of the autonomous artist,




we also miss the opportunity to provide conceptual tools
needed to ...
participatory culture   trad. media lit
fandom scholarship                     critical thinking
participatory culture       trad. media lit
fandom scholarship                         critical thinking




    Confronti...
participatory culture              trad. media lit
fandom scholarship                                  critical thinking

...
participatory culture       trad. media lit
fandom scholarship                         critical thinking




    Confronti...
participatory culture       trad. media lit
fandom scholarship                         critical thinking




    Confronti...
Moby-Dick Teaching Guide:
     exploring how a better
understanding of remixing might
   transform the teaching of
Melvill...
Moby-Dick Teaching Guide:
     exploring how a better
understanding of remixing might
   transform the teaching of
Melvill...
Wyn Kelly
Senior Lecturer, MIT Literature
Melville Scholar
Ricardo Pitts-Wiley
original text
original text




training school
youth r  e-write
original text




training school
youth r  e-write




             Ricardo script
                 drafts
original text




training school
youth r  e-write

                               input from teen cast
                  ...
original text


                                  performance



training school
youth r  e-write

                       ...
original text


                                  performance



training school
youth r  e-write

                       ...
Moby-Dick Then and Now, plot description
Moby-Dick Then and Now, plot description
Melville’s Moby-Dick
Melville’s Moby-Dick




 Ricardo’s
Moby-Dick
Melville’s Moby-Dick




 Ricardo’s
Moby-Dick




             NML Moby-Dick
             Teacher’s Guide
Melville’s Moby-Dick




 Ricardo’s
Moby-Dick


                               classroom activities

             NML Moby...
Melville’s Moby-Dick



                               awareness of remixing in
                                contempora...
Melville’s Moby-Dick



                               awareness of remixing in
                                contempora...
(on language)
(on language)
appropriation: the ability to meaningfully sample
           and remix media content
Through remixing, people can generate new ideas. It
can be a vehicle for people to comment upon the role of
media and tech...
collaboration, transmedia storytelling,
telling stories across multiple media forms
Session 2: Activity - Finding the Sign Posts




When reading a discontinuous text, looking for particular
markers or quot...
Session 2: Activity - Finding the Sign Posts



Whether it's philosophical musings or purely action and plot,
different si...
Session 2: Activity - Finding the Sign Posts



In this activity, students learn that there are multiple ways
of reading a...
Session 2: Activity - Finding the Sign Posts

Related Subjects:
English, media studies

Objectives:
By the end of this cha...
from reading to authoring
Sessions 3 & 4: Activity II - Creating your own discontinuous text

In today's world of new media, students have to deal w...
Sessions 3 & 4: Activity II - Creating your own discontinuous text

In today's world of new media, students have to deal w...
www.newmedialiteracies.org

new site goes live March 17th, 2008
material is digitized, networked, accessible
Moby-Dick Remixed:  Appropriation as a New Media Literacy
Moby-Dick Remixed:  Appropriation as a New Media Literacy
Moby-Dick Remixed:  Appropriation as a New Media Literacy
Moby-Dick Remixed:  Appropriation as a New Media Literacy
Moby-Dick Remixed:  Appropriation as a New Media Literacy
Moby-Dick Remixed:  Appropriation as a New Media Literacy
Moby-Dick Remixed:  Appropriation as a New Media Literacy
Moby-Dick Remixed:  Appropriation as a New Media Literacy
Moby-Dick Remixed:  Appropriation as a New Media Literacy
Moby-Dick Remixed:  Appropriation as a New Media Literacy
Moby-Dick Remixed:  Appropriation as a New Media Literacy
Moby-Dick Remixed:  Appropriation as a New Media Literacy
Moby-Dick Remixed:  Appropriation as a New Media Literacy
Moby-Dick Remixed:  Appropriation as a New Media Literacy
Moby-Dick Remixed:  Appropriation as a New Media Literacy
Moby-Dick Remixed:  Appropriation as a New Media Literacy
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Moby-Dick Remixed: Appropriation as a New Media Literacy

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This is a talk I gave at the Society for Cinema and Media Studies conference in Philadelphia PA, March 2008. I was also on the panel "The Educational Affordances of Remix Culture".

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Moby-Dick Remixed: Appropriation as a New Media Literacy

  1. 1. Anna van Someren New Media Literacies Comparative Media Studies Massachusetts Institute of Technology Moby-Dick Remix: Appropriation as a New Media Literacy
  2. 2. re-imagine re-think repurpose re-work mod recombine remix vid reverse-engineer appropriate mash-up adapt machinema re-contextualize
  3. 3. m ash-ups fan videos, vids
  4. 4. m ash-ups fan videos, vids
  5. 5. idea of engaging with the dynamic text has historical precedent
  6. 6. idea of engaging with the dynamic text has historical precedent
  7. 7. idea of engaging with the dynamic text has historical precedent much of our canon of revered literature was produced by recombining previous material
  8. 8. quot;A man might write the works of others, adding and changing nothing, in which case he is simply called a 'scribe'(scriptor). Another writes the work of others with additions which are not his own; and he is called a 'compiler' (compilator). Another writes both others' work and his own, but with others' work in principal place, adding his own for purposes of explanation; and he is called a ‘commentator’ (commentator)....Another writes both his own work and others' but with his own work in principal place adding others for purposes of confirmation; and such a man should be called an 'author'(auctor).quot; -13th Century Franciscan, Saint Bonaventura
  9. 9. not new, but easier, faster, more prevalent
  10. 10. The current emphasis on digital remixing makes visible the degree to which all cultural expression builds on what has come before. -Henry Jenkins
  11. 11. schools still embrace the “lone author”, “artist genius”, the myth of the original creative work
  12. 12. schools still embrace the “lone author”, “artist genius”, the myth of the original creative work
  13. 13. schools still embrace the “lone author”, “artist genius”, the myth of the original creative work teachers need language, frameworks to investigate the ethical and legal implications of remix practice
  14. 14. http://www.pz.harvard.edu/Research/GoodWork.htm
  15. 15. http://www.pz.harvard.edu/Research/GoodWork.htm HGSE Project Zero: Good Play Young People, Ethics, and the New Digital Media: A Synthesis from the Good Play Project
  16. 16. Good Play’s 5 ethical categories: 1. identity 2. privacy 3. ownership / authorship 4. credibility 5. participation
  17. 17. Good Play’s 5 ethical categories: 1. identity 2. privacy 3. ownership / authorship 4. credibility 5. participation
  18. 18. if we hold onto the idea of the autonomous artist, we also miss the opportunity to provide conceptual tools needed to analyze and interpret creative works
  19. 19. participatory culture trad. media lit fandom scholarship critical thinking
  20. 20. participatory culture trad. media lit fandom scholarship critical thinking Confronting the Challenges of Participatory Culture: Media Education for the 21st Century
  21. 21. participatory culture trad. media lit fandom scholarship critical thinking Confronting the Challenges of Participatory Culture: Media Education for the 21st Century •multitasking •appropriation •visualization •judgment •play •transmedia navigation •simulation •networking •performance • collective intelligence •negotiation •distributed cognition
  22. 22. participatory culture trad. media lit fandom scholarship critical thinking Confronting the Challenges of Participatory Culture: Media Education for the 21st Century
  23. 23. participatory culture trad. media lit fandom scholarship critical thinking Confronting the Challenges of Participatory Culture: Media Education for the 21st Century materials for informal practical interventions for learning (online) the classroom context
  24. 24. Moby-Dick Teaching Guide: exploring how a better understanding of remixing might transform the teaching of Melville, Moby-Dick and literature
  25. 25. Moby-Dick Teaching Guide: exploring how a better understanding of remixing might transform the teaching of Melville, Moby-Dick and literature “why Moby-Dick?”
  26. 26. Wyn Kelly Senior Lecturer, MIT Literature Melville Scholar
  27. 27. Ricardo Pitts-Wiley
  28. 28. original text
  29. 29. original text training school youth r e-write
  30. 30. original text training school youth r e-write Ricardo script drafts
  31. 31. original text training school youth r e-write input from teen cast (language) Ricardo script drafts
  32. 32. original text performance training school youth r e-write input from teen cast (language) Ricardo script drafts
  33. 33. original text performance training school youth r e-write input from teen cast (language) Ricardo script drafts
  34. 34. Moby-Dick Then and Now, plot description
  35. 35. Moby-Dick Then and Now, plot description
  36. 36. Melville’s Moby-Dick
  37. 37. Melville’s Moby-Dick Ricardo’s Moby-Dick
  38. 38. Melville’s Moby-Dick Ricardo’s Moby-Dick NML Moby-Dick Teacher’s Guide
  39. 39. Melville’s Moby-Dick Ricardo’s Moby-Dick classroom activities NML Moby-Dick Teacher’s Guide
  40. 40. Melville’s Moby-Dick awareness of remixing in contemporary culture Ricardo’s Moby-Dick classroom activities NML Moby-Dick Teacher’s Guide
  41. 41. Melville’s Moby-Dick awareness of remixing in contemporary culture Ricardo’s Moby-Dick classroom activities NML Moby-Dick Teacher’s Guide
  42. 42. (on language)
  43. 43. (on language)
  44. 44. appropriation: the ability to meaningfully sample and remix media content
  45. 45. Through remixing, people can generate new ideas. It can be a vehicle for people to comment upon the role of media and technology in society. Remixing can strengthen media literacy skills because it can deepen peopleʼs awareness of an authorʼs purpose and context. Context is often not well-understood as a component of meaning. Through strategic juxtaposition and shifts in context, messages change their meanings. Remixing illustrates a key concept of media literacy: that meaning is in people, not in texts. - Renee Hobbs blog interview with Henry Jenkins
  46. 46. collaboration, transmedia storytelling, telling stories across multiple media forms
  47. 47. Session 2: Activity - Finding the Sign Posts When reading a discontinuous text, looking for particular markers or quot;sign postsquot; becomes important in helping you navigate through the text. In this lesson plan, we define quot;signpostingquot; as the act of identifying and connecting those contextual clues which help you identify what is contained in the passage.
  48. 48. Session 2: Activity - Finding the Sign Posts Whether it's philosophical musings or purely action and plot, different signposts point to different strands of meaning within a single text. The importance of a particular strand of meaning depends on the goals of the reader. Someone interested in the outcome of Ahab's quest for Moby Dick may be looking for very different signposts than someone who is interested in the practicalities of life aboard a 19th century whaling ship.
  49. 49. Session 2: Activity - Finding the Sign Posts In this activity, students learn that there are multiple ways of reading a text which correspond to a reader's goals or motivations. By connecting the process of looking for signposts with goals, students develop the new media literacy skills of networking (by searching for and synthesizing different signposts according to particular goals), as well as multitasking (by shifting focus when needed on different strands of meaning within a single text).
  50. 50. Session 2: Activity - Finding the Sign Posts Related Subjects: English, media studies Objectives: By the end of this chapter, students will: •Be able to recognize and identify literary terms, including plot, dialogue, tone, diction, and language, and to recognize and identify shifts in these (NCTE standards •Be able to identify and distinguish between different types of literary texts by performing a close reading of tone, language, dialogue, diction and purpose (NCTE standards 4, 9, 10, 11, & 12); •Understand the basics of academic annotation of a text, including identifying key passages, defining unfamiliar terms, and conducting and presenting research on historical, literary, or biographical elements of a text (NCTE Standard 24); •Begin to acquire a vocabulary of literary terms and apply them to literary texts (NCTE standards 10, 12)
  51. 51. from reading to authoring
  52. 52. Sessions 3 & 4: Activity II - Creating your own discontinuous text In today's world of new media, students have to deal with alternate forms of text. Often information is presented online as hypertext with links to related or explanatory information. An understanding of how hypertext works sheds new light on older literary texts like the Bible and Moby Dick that rely on discontinuous narratives. These discontinuous, or quot;digressivequot; texts, can be thought of as classic 'hypertext' documents that include digressions such as genealogies, histories, or philosophical musings within the narrative itself. This activity asks student to imagine traditional texts as hypertexts, in order to aid the development of the skill of networking - in this case, not only the ability to searching for information, but to synthesize and disseminate this information in a new format.
  53. 53. Sessions 3 & 4: Activity II - Creating your own discontinuous text In today's world of new media, students have to deal with alternate forms of text. Often information is presented online as hypertext with links to related or explanatory information. An understanding of how hypertext works sheds new light on older literary texts like the Bible and Moby Dick that rely on discontinuous narratives. These discontinuous, or quot;digressivequot; texts, can be thought of as classic 'hypertext' documents that include digressions such as genealogies, histories, or philosophical musings within the narrative itself. This activity asks student to imagine traditional texts as hypertexts, in order to aid the development of the skill of networking - in this case, not only the ability to searching for information, but to synthesize and disseminate this information in a new format. Required materials * Computer to view video and hypertext examples * Computers for students (high-tech version) * Paper and Pens (low-tech version) * Paper copies of a previously-chosen passage (low-tech version) * Copies of passage from Annotated Moby Dick
  54. 54. www.newmedialiteracies.org new site goes live March 17th, 2008
  55. 55. material is digitized, networked, accessible

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