Social Media For Social GoodThese materials are available under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 License.
Amy Sample Ward                                             Melinda Chang     @amyrsward                                  ...
Agenda: 15 Minute Break     •      Strategy     •      Break     •      Listening     •      Break     •      Content     ...
What is Social Media?Using the Internet to instantly collaborate, shareinformation, and have a conversation about ideasand...
Powered by…   These materials are available under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 License.
These materials are available under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 License.
IT’S A CONVERSATION BETWEENPEOPLE These materials are available under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 L...
Audiences These materials are available under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 License.
Donors These materials are available under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 License.
VolunteersThese materials are available under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 License.
AND THAT CONVERSATION IS…These materials are available under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 License.
Not Controlled  These materials are available under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 License.
Not Organized  These materials are available under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 License.
Not on Message  These materials are available under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 License.
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RelationshipsThese materials are available under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 License.
These materials are available under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 License.
GUT CHECK: SOCIAL MEDIACULTURE SHOCK These materials are available under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3....
Organizational Development Concerns     •      Acceptable Use     •      Business Voice and Personal Voice     •      Coor...
SHARE PAIR: DEALING WITHORGANIZATION CULTURE These materials are available under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonComme...
Start with StrategyA social media strategy map helps yourorganization think throughobjectives, audience, content, strategy...
Strategy Step by Step•   Objectives•   Audience•   Integration•   Tools and Tactics•   Measurement      These materials ar...
Objective•What do you want to accomplish with social media?•Describe how your social media objective supports or links to ...
Give Your Social Media ObjectiveAn IQ Test!   These materials are available under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonComm...
To draw political attention to ongoing genocide in Darfur by delivering 1 millionpostcards to be sent to Obama within his ...
Strategy Step by Step•   Objectives•   Audience•   Integration•   Tools and Tactics•   Measurement      These materials ar...
Audience   1. Who must you reach with your social media      efforts to meet your objective? Why this      target group?  ...
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What Are They Doing Online?   These materials are available under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 Licen...
Strategy Step by Step•   Objectives•   Audience•   Integration•   Tools and Tactics•   Measurement      These materials ar...
An Integrated Strategy                                                                             One Way                ...
California State Parks Foundation• May 2009• 100 Park ClosuresImminent• 500 Facebook Fans• Mostly Direct MailSupportsNew S...
An Integrated Strategy for CSPF                                                                             One Way       ...
Integrated ComponentsHome Base                                 One Way                                         SocialWeb s...
Integrated Looks & Message   These materials are available under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 License.
Campaign Results   These materials are available under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 License.
The Final Tally      •      $950,000 Raised      •      $300,000 Online             •     Tough to track specifically to s...
HOMEWORK: START YOURSTRATEGY MAPThese materials are available under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 Lic...
The NOT–SO–S.M.A.R.T PLAN“We just implemented a new application processonline and need to drive traffic to it. Everyonehas...
The OH–SO–S.M.A.R.T PLAN“With the new online application process, UUE needs toreach its core audience – teachers. Their go...
What Works for Your OrgSpecific      What does your org want to accomplish?              What do I already have in place? ...
Agenda: 15 Minute Break     •      Strategy     •      Break     •      Listening     •      Break     •      Content     ...
Strategy Step by Step•   Objectives•   Audience•   Integration•   Tools and Tactics•   Measurement      These materials ar...
Agenda: 15 Minute Break     •      Strategy     •      Break     •      Listening     •      Break     •      Content     ...
Say What?Conteent
You Are The Future                              - Peter Drucker (d. 2005)         “If you want to be interesting,         ...
On Engagement                - David Ogilvy
Strategy Is QueenContent Strategy Is Queen                - Abigail Adams (sort of)                                       ...
Why Content Strategy?           “The main goal of content           strategy is to use words and           data to create ...
Communicating Your              MissionUse brand architecture to go from the             abstract to the specific.
Mission, Purpose, Brand        We’re not that different.
Mission, Purpose, Brand        YOU ARE HERE
Tie Messaging to Brand         VISION: A world where good prevails over evil.                           Luke, I need      ...
4    Audience & Positioning                                     ALL OUR AUDIENCES     VolunteerMatch is the Web’s largest ...
5     Audience &Segmenting                  Volunteer        Nonprofit        Multichapter       Business/Govt/Sch     MSM...
Your Responsibilities to Brand
StorytellingUse the basics of story to connect on a     human level and sustain interest.
Story Is A Journey                     Photo: aepoc
Be The Change                WORLD                COMMUNITY                My family       CHANGE                   and   ...
The Volunteer‟s Story                                       Achievement                                       “Saving the ...
The Engager‟s Story                                     Achievement                                     “Great            ...
Parts of Not Volunteer StoryStories the Programs            I‟m a            story!                               I‟m a   ...
Collecting & Curating      the Experience    Optimizing For Storytelling
Social Media                        Sharing SavingPhoto: Flickr/courosa
Determine the Need             ConstituentsSaving                      SharingSocial Sharing Public
Improve Your Odds  • Invest in cameras! Remind supporters to    bring cameras.  • Run photo/video/story contests  • Send o...
Corralling Your Content                               Professional                     Videos                             ...
Website Commandments                     “Your Support                     page MUST have                     a range of o...
How Much Is Too Frequent?                            99
Creating Flexible Content  • Make it easy for supporters to share.  • Avoid cross-posting if you can. Follow    specificat...
Bringing It TogetherSocial Content & The 3 Rs of Volunteer                         Engagement
3 R‟s In Action                       Friend          Recognize              Recruit                      Coming          ...
3 R‟s In Action              Recognize, Recruit
3 R‟s In Action              Recognize, Recruit
3 R‟s In Action              Recognize, Recruit
3 R‟s In Action                  Recruit
3 R‟s In Action                  Recruit, Retain.
3 R‟s In Action                  Recognize
3 R‟s In Action                  Recruit
3 R‟s In Action              Recruit, Recognize
Friends of Trees                   “If we can reach lots of people via social                   media those are part of th...
Friends of Trees
Friends of Trees
Friends of Trees
Friends of Trees
3 R‟s In Action
3 R‟s In Action
3 R‟s In Action
Workshop!What‟s Your Social Media       Content Strategy?                 30 Minutes
Say What? Final Tips on Social Media & Content • As culture is changing, people want what you have. Be   confident and pro...
Awesome Content ResourcesGeneral Content and Social Media   Forum One                                   www.forumone.comBe...
Say What?Conteent
Agenda: 15 Minute Break     •      Strategy     •      Break     •      Listening     •      Break     •      Content     ...
Strategy Step by Step•   Objectives•   Audience•   Integration•   Tools and Tactics•   Measurement      These materials ar...
Social Media Evaluation               @bobfilbin
Introduction: Deciding to Evaluate
Introduction: Deciding to EvaluateHave all of you make achange in how youevaluate social mediawhen you return towork.
Introduction: Deciding to Evaluate
Introduction: Deciding to Evaluate
Introduction: Who Will Evaluate?
Intro: Who Will Evaluate?
Three Steps to Evaluation   Gather → Analyze → Act
Gathering DataProblem: So much data!- Facebook Insights alone: Over 1,000 metricsSolution: Ask “What Action Can I Take?”Ot...
Gathering DataForget ThisStart with This
Gathering Data(Free) Tools• Facebook: Insights  – Post-Level Data, Lifetime Talking About This…• Twitter: Crowdbooster  – ...
Analyzing Data
Analyzing Data
Analyzing Data
Acting on Data• 36x as many people talking about these vs.  regular posts. (That’s 1 week’s worth of posts.)
Acting on Data
Acting on Data
Acting on Data“…the sequence of change is not ANALYZE-THINK-    CHANGE, but rather SEE-FEEL-CHANGE.”
Acting on Data“…the sequence of change is not ANALYZE-THINK-    CHANGE, but rather SEE-FEEL-CHANGE.”
• Amy Sample Ward                                           • Melinda Chang     • @amyrsward                              ...
Social Media for Social Good - NCVS Pre-Con Workshp
Social Media for Social Good - NCVS Pre-Con Workshp
Social Media for Social Good - NCVS Pre-Con Workshp
Social Media for Social Good - NCVS Pre-Con Workshp
Social Media for Social Good - NCVS Pre-Con Workshp
Social Media for Social Good - NCVS Pre-Con Workshp
Social Media for Social Good - NCVS Pre-Con Workshp
Social Media for Social Good - NCVS Pre-Con Workshp
Social Media for Social Good - NCVS Pre-Con Workshp
Social Media for Social Good - NCVS Pre-Con Workshp
Social Media for Social Good - NCVS Pre-Con Workshp
Social Media for Social Good - NCVS Pre-Con Workshp
Social Media for Social Good - NCVS Pre-Con Workshp
Social Media for Social Good - NCVS Pre-Con Workshp
Social Media for Social Good - NCVS Pre-Con Workshp
Social Media for Social Good - NCVS Pre-Con Workshp
Social Media for Social Good - NCVS Pre-Con Workshp
Social Media for Social Good - NCVS Pre-Con Workshp
Social Media for Social Good - NCVS Pre-Con Workshp
Social Media for Social Good - NCVS Pre-Con Workshp
Social Media for Social Good - NCVS Pre-Con Workshp
Social Media for Social Good - NCVS Pre-Con Workshp
Social Media for Social Good - NCVS Pre-Con Workshp
Social Media for Social Good - NCVS Pre-Con Workshp
Social Media for Social Good - NCVS Pre-Con Workshp
Social Media for Social Good - NCVS Pre-Con Workshp
Social Media for Social Good - NCVS Pre-Con Workshp
Social Media for Social Good - NCVS Pre-Con Workshp
Social Media for Social Good - NCVS Pre-Con Workshp
Social Media for Social Good - NCVS Pre-Con Workshp
Social Media for Social Good - NCVS Pre-Con Workshp
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Social Media for Social Good - NCVS Pre-Con Workshp

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This workshop was presented by Amy Sample Ward of NTEN, Noland Hoshino of Bcause Media, Robert Rosenthal of VolunteerMatch, and Bob Filbin of DoSomething. Learn more at http://nten.org

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  • Let’s start at the beginning: what is social media, exactly? It really defines those tools that let us participate in a two way dialogue.The important part here is that collaboration, sharing, conversations, etc. are two way, or even with many people, instantly! Once that tweet is posted, people can reply, pass it on, etc. Content is incredibly important as that is the start to the conversations, and Robert will be talking about content later today. The content, though, is powered by…
  • How many people, when they went to check in at their hotel yesterday, walked up to the building – no, just the building? No one, we all talked to a person at the counter. What about when you go to your friend’s house? Or when you want to volunteer with an organization? No? No building talkers here? The same is true online – we want to connect with other people. Not robots.
  • Audiences or participants in your events, campaigns, and programs or services want to talk to you – they have feedback and ideas, they may want to be more involved, maybe they have questions. They also want to talk to each other! Participating in events or campaigns may be how they are meeting other people with similar interests and they want to make friends or find collaborators for a project of their own.
  • Flickr Photo: http://www.flickr.com/photos/commitforlife/2907627885/Donors aren’t just those giving money, but may also be giving you other vital materials you need to do your work. And they want to talk to you about why they do it, what they think of your work, and other ways they may be able to give. They also want to talk to each other just like your participants. Social media is a great place where you can build trust and cultivate relationships with donors even before they’ve given anything.
  • Flickr photo: http://www.flickr.com/photos/lshave/2862109995/Volunteers certainly want to talk to you! They need to talk to you: find what they can do to help, share back with you what they’ve done or learned, and even their ideas for what more they can contribute. And, they need to talk to each other – share experiences and information, encourage each other, form relationships and friendships through the work, and more.
  • Great – you’re having lot of conversations and you’re facilitating many more to happen amongst the community. These conversations, though
  • Flickr Photo: http://www.flickr.com/photos/brotherxii/3176210660/Not controlled – remember, you influence the conversation by being online and being a part of it. You can never control it – but if you aren’t participating, then you forfeit your chance to even influence the way it goes.
  • Flickr Photo: http://www.flickr.com/photos/nrkbeta/2256061768/It’s also not organized! This is something that often contributes to organizations feeling overwhelmed when they first dive in to social media – conversations can take place all over the place and move at any time. Using hashtags and other tools for tracking can help you stay on top of the conversation.
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/cowrin/2201657145/sizes/o/in/photostream/These conversations aren’t on message. The reason there are so many conversations is because everyone has an opinion, an experience, or an idea to share – and they share it! Turns out, no everyone agrees with me online.  But, for an organization, this is important to remember so you can plan for questions or messages that may get posed on your channels or generally in the conversation by the community that don’t support the action or policy you want to point people towards.
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/luix90/4970957105/sizes/l/in/photostream/They are about relationships. Not in a young love kind of way, but everything else: trust, transparency, reciprocity, fun, being real.
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/admitchell08/2574455073/sizes/z/in/photostream/For many organizations, the idea of taking down that brick wall and letting a staff person be a human online is scary. It is really the only way, though, if you want to build up the kinds of relationships and sustain engagement that you need.
  • Let’s take a moment here for a gut check in the room.
  • These are all topics that organizations may have on their list of concerns around social media and may be why they aren’t yet using these tools. It may be deciding what is and isn’t okay to post online or it may be message alignment with other departments; maybe staff don’t feel like they know how to use the tools but don’t want to look stupid trying them out in public.
  • Let’s take a couple minutes to talk with your neighbor about what concerns may exist at your organization and if you or other staff have done anything to change or alleviate those fears. I’ll put the previous slide back up while you’re talking for ideas.
  • We are going to walk through some steps to building a social media strategy and I hope you’ll take some notes about your own objectives and goals. The following workshop topics are going to continue to use your own established goals for social media so this is your time to think it over and start working on the strategy.
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/climens/3911106012/
  • Now, restate your objective so it is “SMART” – That means that it has specificity, it is measureable, it is attainable in the framework of your plan, it is focused on a result, and has a specific timeline. You can use this method for large or small objectivesOutputs vs. Impact. Frequency of attendanceCuriosity to learn about the art formDepth of emotional responseQuality of social connections
  • Here’s a great example of a SMART goal:
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/climens/3911106012/
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/climens/3911106012/
  • You’ll notice there is no stop sign in this graphic. Content, people, and actions all move around this cycle continually.
  • Before we take a break, we are going to have Melinda Chang from Npower share a SMART goal – keep your brains working on this focus.
  • Urban Education Exchange - improving literacy in young children across the nation. Urban Education Exchange provides ReadWorks, a research-based and classroom-proven online reading comprehension curriculum for grades K-6, supported by their online and in-person teacher training.  ReadWorks addresses deficiencies in teacher preparation and commonly utilized core reading programs by providing teachers with proven lessons and training for explicitly teaching the component skills and strategies of reading comprehension, while cultivating vocabulary and background knowledge.
  • Specific – Rather than simply drive to get a number of Likes on your institution’s Facebook page, focus on one of the outcomes that really matter to your department (such as number of applications completed) and identify specific opportunities to use social technologies to complement your other efforts toward that goal.AnalyticsAlready had a robust mailing list and network – start from thereDirected Facebook traffic to website falling off – need for website refreshFacebook not picking up traffic – should not be an isolated channelFocus group – current site left teachers bewildered and unable to locate easily the information they want mostTasksEmployed several different communication channelsEmail messaging directing teachers to online appsCustom Facebook tab - built in-house using free tools and basic Web codePromoted the custom Facebook tab, including direct email, application landing page, UUE homepage and several other online literary sites The Facebook tab was built in-house using free tools and basic Web code, but provided a nice, vibrant, stylized, on-brand presence inside of Facebook, with clear, direct calls to actionOptimize website, revamped recruitment landing page – Walks them through the application process in quick, easy stepsIncludes only the information they most need: how to request more information, how to complete an applicationIncludes an online copy of ReadWorks curriculumMeasurable - What UUE achieved in this example was a thoughtful and well-planned integration of Facebook into its broader recruitment strategy – as one of multiple channels for reaching prospective teachers. Because UUE was able to align one message across these varied channels, the institution was able to maximize its reach and the response:- HMTL emails contributed to a 125% increase in Facebook tab- Compelling content Email invitations saw a click-through rate of just over 60%- The end result of this strategy was a 46% increase in the number of new teacher participation in ReadWorks.Achievable - Does your organization currently have a marketing / communications department?What is your resource capacity (staff, time, equipment, etc.)? What level of involvement can you maintain and support?Who or what sites are sending people to your website?Start off with the familiar – email campaignsContent – print testimonials already in place, used content to expand to video testimonials on Youtube to post online, included interviews with teachers & students who could tell stories about how they overcame barriers to their reading successFeeder of content – instead of worry to keep blogs fresh and creating new content, UUE already knew where to find relevant stats & postings on literacy issues. Tap existing network
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/climens/3911106012/
  • Peter Drucker was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom for his work in the field of management. He’s the guy who first coined “knowledge workers”… back in the 1950s. That’s foresight. Druckerhad a lot to say about the importance of your work, but he died before it could be made clear to him the role that online social networks would play in all this. Myspace, Facebook, Flickr, YouTube, and Twitter, all launched in just three short years. Words like “exploits,” “solves” and even “mobilize” belie a top-down view of social change. Social media, of course, is about bottoms up. Today the most effective organizations are either built explicitly to respond to the needs of the community, or they’ve learned how to open themselves up to be conduits for the community in action. The Zen truth of things is this: Engagement isn’t an ingredient in a recipe for success. It’s the meal. Rather than a step toward your mission, it is your mission. Which makes you, just as much as any development director or program officer, a huge part of the picture.
  • David Ogilvy, the Father of Advertising, was really good at engaging people. He could hardly afford college, but when he died he lived in a chateau. He actually launched his career as a door to door stove salesman. He did so well the firm asked him to write a manual for other salespeople. 30 years later FORTUNE called the “the finest sales instruction manual ever written.”Later on, David Ogilvy had to retrain his staff. He said the nature of engagement is the opposite of what most marketers and advertisers think. It’s not about getting people to care about a product. It’s about helping people you care about see which products are best for them. Those who involve volunteers for a living may already know this. You know that your challenge is notreally to get volunteers to care about your mission. Instead, it’s about helping them to see how being involved in your organization is a great way for them to express the care they already have for a cause. When you care about your volunteers and their interests, you are interested in them. And this motivates you to help them s see all the ways in which their interests align with yours.Ogilvy also insisted that his team should strive to be real, to be clear, to try to say things as simply as possible. But most of all, he wanted them to root their words in real world observations. Strategy should come first.
  • This is Laura Linney as Abagail Adams. Abagail Adams knew about men and power. When her husband John was George Washington’s VP, she was the first Second Lady of the United States. Then when he was the President, she became the second First Lady of the United States. How cool is that. Abagail Adam is best known for giving her husband tons of awesome advice. Their letters are filled with intellectual discussions. He was the mouthpiece and the community organizer, but she was really the strategist. He was the firebrand and a brilliant wordsmith. But she helped him channel his passion for change into productive ideas that could meet the needs and concerns of the real world 18th century families as well as provide a vision for a way forward into an uncertain future as a young and independent nation.
  • Lovinger wasn’t a nonprofit person. She worked at a fancy web agency when she wrote this. But she knew like David Ogilvy how much engagement depends on finding shared meaning between a publisher and an audience. She also wrote, “There are many factors that determine whether something is meaningful, but the primary one … is relationships”. She was talking about relationships between data as objects… How a thumbnail photo of a shirt that’s on sale relates to its caption. How those objects together relate to the description from the manufacturer. How all of that relates to the bullet points that describe the details of the sale, the return policy, and so on. Lovinger would say that nothing should exist out of context. Otherwise, it would be meaningless.Or to put it another way:What you say in social media, what you share, the story you tell, even who’s story you tell should all be related.Content should always be a tool to support the work of your organization’s missionThe real meaning of your mission is to facilitate experiences and relationships around a specific cause.Therefore, your work in social media should be to produce and share content that facilitates experiences and relationshipsSo what on earth does that? For a cause-based organization, the relational points are mission and story.
  • Good people and good causes… Really it’s just good people working together. They’ve all recognized a need and committed to addressing it. Some are specialists who do it for a living. We call these nonprofit professionals. Others drop in on the cause when and how then can. We call these supporters, donors, volunteers, board members, and so on. Your brand, also known as your mission or your purpose, is the tie that connects.
  • Despite its bad reputation over the years in the nonprofit world, brand is every social media for social good warrior’s best friend, even a Jedi knight’s. Because everyone’s a publisher these days, everyone has an audience, and no one is completely in control, the role of brand in social change is more important than ever. It helps you differentiate your work from other organizations. It helps supporters know what to expect from shared experiences. And, it provides you and your team with an agreed upon way to communicate your mission and purpose.
  • There are two things you can to make sure this happens:Commit to understanding and using your organization’s brand manual, messaging, style guidelines, and other brand assets. Getting it right, especially in 140 characters or less, takes practice. If your brand manual isn’t helping you engage your volunteers, let others in the organization know. Brands are living, breathing things that should evolve over time to fit changing times. Reminder, brand is your friend. Done well, brand is the fuel of engagement… a clear, simple and sustained expression of your organization. There are lots of great models offered for how to communicate your brand. The folks from Big Duck in New York have a great blog for nonprofits you can follow. I’ve added some resources at the end of this presentation.
  • Story, on the other hand, is the spark.From movies, to books, to restaurant reviews, story telling is at the heart of all great content strategy. Whether from word, text, or image, humans are endowed with incredible ability to extract information and produce meaning from stories. Pretty much any content, presented as a well-formed story, will resonate. But there are two types of stories that resonate most of all: stories of transformation and stories of solving problems. Lucky for you, these are really the same story… the Journey. Here are a few Journey stories you may not recognize:An organization’s annual reportThe story of one organization’s journey over 365 days toward its mission. A review on VolunteerMatch.orgThe journey a volunteer with high expectations toward a place of knowledge.A collection of snapshots from a fundraising galaThe journey of a bunch of important donors towards a place of connectedness.A press release about a new corporate sponsorThe journey of organizations from different sectors toward a place of alignment. A case study about a failed programThe journey of recognition of limitations.And the medium doesn’t matter – what matters is Facebook call a post a “status update.”
  • What they all have in common is Change. Things are changing, and this is how and why. That’s basically Story. For those who engage volunteers, helping volunteers to see these outcomes as clearly as possible is so important. “Here’s how you will change. Here’s how we will change. Here’s how the community will change.”Stories of change and impact help us do that. They are the message of of volunteer engagement.
  • What’s the Volunteer’s Story?The volunteer is a hero. Like all stories, the hero story has a beginning, a middle and an end. Great engagers know where their volunteers are in their stories and they help them to advance to the end. Instigation points sound like this:“The hiking trails were in terrible shape. Anyone know a charity that’s working to fix them up?”“I was invited to take part.”“My friend wants me to come along to the clean up. Should I do it?”Obstacle points sound like this:“I’m definitely over getting up every Saturday morning to serve breakfast to the homeless. I want my weekends back.”“Just getting them to return my emails so I could get approval on designs has been a nightmare.”“I’m just not sure I’m getting much out of my volunteering.”Achievement slides sound like this:“Wow, was that ever worth it”.”“Just seeing their faces light up was amazing.”“it was the toughest thing I’ve ever done, but I learned so much.”“I’ve met so many great people.”
  • Of course, you have a role to play too. Here’s where you fit in. Engaging during Instigation sounds like this:“We have an awesome volunteer event lined up!”“Who likes pizza and making a difference?”“This is opportunity to learn new skills and support the mission of an organization that’s doing amazing work in your local community. “Engaging to overcome Obstacles sounds like this:“OK, everyone, here’s the plan for today.”“We still need a few people to make the clean up a success.”“So far so good, but we need to come back to finish the job. Stay tuned and I’ll be back in touch with details.”Engaging to facilitate and celebrate Achievement sounds like this:“Don’t forget to bring a camera, everyone!”“We posted the video of the completed mural on Youtube.”“I’m sharing an awesome note the school just sent us.”Your job is to help the volunteer see where they are in their story and help move them along to achievement… a pretty important plot device.
  • Communicate the story, not the program. Both these images are about water. But they say completely different things. Programs are about parts. Stories are fluid. They are evolving. They have drama. They have role players. Stories are greater than the sum of the parts.
  • Now that we know the elements of the volunteering story, and we know some key messages that will resonate…. let’s talk about how to bring that story to social media. What may be helpful here is to see how volunteer coordinators at smart nonprofits are doing this. Their roles, after all, are very similar to yours. Let’s check out some examples. And while we’re doing that, keep in mind that social media is all about sharing and saving. In fact, online social networks today are the most efficient systems for sharing and saving experiences… ever! So as we go through the examples and keep in mind how some tools are great for sharing, some great for saving experiences, and some great for both.
  • Stuff here about best practices in gathering/supportingphotos, videos, stories, testimonials, reviewsZMOT
  • Now that we know how to interpret the brand, how to find and share elements of the volunteering story, and how to write actionable and flexible content… it’s time to do your job. Let’s see about how bring all to bear on volunteer engagement, the functions that brought that most of you you here.
  • AtVolunteerMatch we tend to boil much of the work of volunteer engagement into 3 Rs, recruitment, retention, recognition. Perhaps we should add a 4th… reductive The shorthand doesn’t really matters. What matters is:Developing a relationship that will lead to a cycle of regular, long term or episode service. Making it easy for volunteers to share their experiences, engage positively with other volunteers, and use word of mouth to inspire others... That is, to actually be a partner in the 3 Rs.Let’s see if we identify which functions are on display in this series of examples.
  • This is Linkedin’s Volunteer and Causes field. By encouraging volunteers to fill out their professional profiles with their volunteering experiences, two things are happening:The volunteer is being recognized…The volunteer is helping the nonprofit to recruit. Awesome!
  • Photos of a volunteer appreciation dinner, uploaded and shared in a Facebook Fan Page. By showcasing great volunteers it only makes other volunteers want to do the same. And, it makes the evening a better memory. The volunteer is being recognized…The volunteer is helping the nonprofit to recruit.
  • Here’s a video about a volunteer’s story on the organization’s Youtube channel. Again, by showcasing great volunteers it only makes other volunteers want to do the same. The volunteer is being recognized…The volunteer is helping the nonprofit to recruitYou may be starting to see a trend here. Social media can help you tackle multuple aspects of volunteer engagement at all once.
  • Putting a face on the program… who we help and who you can help when you volunteer.
  • Showing the awesome outcome of great volunteers.
  • Now that we know the elements of the volunteering story, let’s talk about how to bring that story to social media. What may be helpful here is to see how volunteer coordinators at smart nonprofits are doing this. Their roles, after all, are very similar to yours. Let’s check out some examples. And while we’re doing that, keep in mind that social media is all about sharing and saving. In fact, online social networks today are the most efficient systems for sharing and saving experiences… ever! So as we go through the examples and keep in mind how some tools are great for sharing, some great for saving experiences, and some great for both.
  • So often we talk about big organizations like Humane Society or Red Cross, or else nimble social media rockstars like Charity: Water. Most organizations aren’t cut from those clothes, nor do they need to be to do good work. Here’s a nice package from an organization in Portland. I like their approach for a lot of reasons. It’s realisticIt’s active – they are trying stuffThey are using their website properly in conjunction with their social media networks. The content is positive and on message.
  • And here it all is, all brought in under one roof at Friends of the Earth.
  • And here it all is, all brought in under one roof at Friends of the Earth.
  • Now that we know how to interpret the brand, how to find and share elements of the volunteering story, and how to write actionable and flexible content… it’s time to do your job. Let’s see about how bring all to bear on volunteer engagement, the functions that brought that most of you you here.
  • AddSocislbriteSocialmedya for npsVlearning v=center
  • AddSocislbriteSocialmedya for npsVlearning v=center
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/climens/3911106012/
  • Why do we do it?
  • Because we don’t know why. (so vain!) should we evaluate? Yes. If we have a goal.
  • Is it an organizational objective? How do things like “likes” contribute or not?
  • Is it an organizational objective? How do things like “likes” contribute or not?
  • Overall goals, but KPIs along the way
  • Photo / no photo. Form and content.
  • When you don’t control the whole process. Or need buy-in, which we all do. This is you. Be positive. Share positively.
  • When you don’t control the whole process. Or need buy-in, which we all do.
  • When you don’t control the whole process. Or need buy-in, which we all do.
  • When you don’t control the whole process. Or need buy-in, which we all do.
  • When you don’t control the whole process. Or need buy-in, which we all do.
  • Social Media for Social Good - NCVS Pre-Con Workshp

    1. 1. Social Media For Social GoodThese materials are available under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 License.
    2. 2. Amy Sample Ward Melinda Chang @amyrsward NPowerNoland Hoshino Robert Rosenthal Bob Filbin@nolandhoshino @volmatchrobert @bobfilbin These materials are available under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 License.
    3. 3. Agenda: 15 Minute Break • Strategy • Break • Listening • Break • Content • Break • Evaluation These materials are available under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 License.
    4. 4. What is Social Media?Using the Internet to instantly collaborate, shareinformation, and have a conversation about ideasand causes we care about.
    5. 5. Powered by… These materials are available under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 License.
    6. 6. These materials are available under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 License.
    7. 7. IT’S A CONVERSATION BETWEENPEOPLE These materials are available under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 License.
    8. 8. Audiences These materials are available under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 License.
    9. 9. Donors These materials are available under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 License.
    10. 10. VolunteersThese materials are available under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 License.
    11. 11. AND THAT CONVERSATION IS…These materials are available under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 License.
    12. 12. Not Controlled These materials are available under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 License.
    13. 13. Not Organized These materials are available under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 License.
    14. 14. Not on Message These materials are available under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 License.
    15. 15. These materials are available under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 License.
    16. 16. RelationshipsThese materials are available under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 License.
    17. 17. These materials are available under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 License.
    18. 18. GUT CHECK: SOCIAL MEDIACULTURE SHOCK These materials are available under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 License.
    19. 19. Organizational Development Concerns • Acceptable Use • Business Voice and Personal Voice • Coordination with communications, HR, legal, and IT • Management tolerance, participation, endorsement • Safe zones for experimentation • Balance "quick and candid" with "thoughtful and professional” These materials are available under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 License.
    20. 20. SHARE PAIR: DEALING WITHORGANIZATION CULTURE These materials are available under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 License.
    21. 21. Start with StrategyA social media strategy map helps yourorganization think throughobjectives, audience, content, strategy, tools, and measurement to support yourorganization’s communications andInternet strategy. These materials are available under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 License.
    22. 22. Strategy Step by Step• Objectives• Audience• Integration• Tools and Tactics• Measurement These materials are available under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 License.
    23. 23. Objective•What do you want to accomplish with social media?•Describe how your social media objective supports or links to aspecific goal from your organization’s strategic plan http://www.flickr.com/photos/wili/214316968/
    24. 24. Give Your Social Media ObjectiveAn IQ Test! These materials are available under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 License.
    25. 25. To draw political attention to ongoing genocide in Darfur by delivering 1 millionpostcards to be sent to Obama within his first 100 days in office These materials are available under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 License.
    26. 26. Strategy Step by Step• Objectives• Audience• Integration• Tools and Tactics• Measurement These materials are available under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 License.
    27. 27. Audience 1. Who must you reach with your social media efforts to meet your objective? Why this target group? 2. Is this a target group identified in your organization’s communications plan? 3. What do they know or believe about your organization or issue? What will resonate with them? 4. What key points do you want to make with your audience?
    28. 28. These materials are available under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 License.
    29. 29. What Are They Doing Online? These materials are available under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 License.
    30. 30. Strategy Step by Step• Objectives• Audience• Integration• Tools and Tactics• Measurement These materials are available under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 License.
    31. 31. An Integrated Strategy One Way Homebase email Web Site search engine ads Audience Objective Social Listening Conversation Connecting These materials are available under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 License.
    32. 32. California State Parks Foundation• May 2009• 100 Park ClosuresImminent• 500 Facebook Fans• Mostly Direct MailSupportsNew Strategy:Reach younger supportersto prepare for a ballotinitiative to protectCalifornia parks. These materials are available under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 License.
    33. 33. An Integrated Strategy for CSPF One Way Homebase email Web Site direct mail ads Recruit 5,000 new Facebook fans in one month Social Facebook YouTube These materials are available under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 License.
    34. 34. Integrated ComponentsHome Base One Way SocialWeb site redesign “Urgent Grams” • Facebook to emphasize: to: Welcome Page• Petition • High Dollar • Fan Videos on• Facebook Donors YouTube• Donations • Other Members • Prospects These materials are available under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 License.
    35. 35. Integrated Looks & Message These materials are available under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 License.
    36. 36. Campaign Results These materials are available under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 License.
    37. 37. The Final Tally • $950,000 Raised • $300,000 Online • Tough to track specifically to social media • 46% of that came from supporters new to CSPF • Email list size grew in tandem with Facebook Fans, suggesting that they are highly related • Ballot initiative campaign is now live These materials are available under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 License.
    38. 38. HOMEWORK: START YOURSTRATEGY MAPThese materials are available under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 License.
    39. 39. The NOT–SO–S.M.A.R.T PLAN“We just implemented a new application processonline and need to drive traffic to it. Everyonehas a Facebook account now so I will set one upfor my org.” - Jennifer, UUEPlan Check List:Is it Specific? Not really. Depending on who you want to reach and what specifically youwant to achieve, is Facebook really the right channel?Is it Measurable? Probably but what does success look like to the org?Is it Achievable? Probably not. Where will you suddenly find the resources to maintainthese accounts? How do you ensure FB to application traffic?Is it Realistic? Probably not, how do you ensure the outcome?Is it Timely? No real way of know when this will take off.
    40. 40. The OH–SO–S.M.A.R.T PLAN“With the new online application process, UUE needs toreach its core audience – teachers. Their goalis to increase application rate by 50%. Let’s set up amulti-channel recruitment campaign targetingGrade K-6 teachers in low-income areas.” - Social Media Strategist, TCCPlan Check List:Is it Specific? Yes. Utilize their robust email list. Integrate FB with all other channels.Ensure easy online application process.Is it Measurable? Yes. Weekly check-ins. Track online visits using Google analytics andthen online application submission rates every week.Is it Achievable? Yes. Executed email campaigns in the past. Use existing content . Tapexisting network.Is it Realistic? Yes. We can devote Sara & 3 volunteers.Is it Timely? Yes. Our gala just passed, we can now prioritize this in the org.
    41. 41. What Works for Your OrgSpecific What does your org want to accomplish? What do I already have in place? What specific tasks should I focus on?Measurable What are my exact measures of success? How will we know when it is accomplished? What tools can I utilize?Achievable How can the goal be accomplished? Do we have experience in this? Can we source the right resources?Realistic Does this match other efforts/needs? Is the goal realistic given current resources? Do I have the budget?Timely Can this be made a priority? When can we do check-ins? When do we reassess?
    42. 42. Agenda: 15 Minute Break • Strategy • Break • Listening • Break • Content • Break • Evaluation These materials are available under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 License.
    43. 43. Strategy Step by Step• Objectives• Audience• Integration• Tools and Tactics• Measurement These materials are available under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 License.
    44. 44. Agenda: 15 Minute Break • Strategy • Break • Listening • Break • Content • Break • Evaluation These materials are available under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 License.
    45. 45. Say What?Conteent
    46. 46. You Are The Future - Peter Drucker (d. 2005) “If you want to be interesting, be interested.”For internal purposes only.Photo: h.koppdelaney/Flickr 76
    47. 47. On Engagement - David Ogilvy
    48. 48. Strategy Is QueenContent Strategy Is Queen - Abigail Adams (sort of) 78
    49. 49. Why Content Strategy? “The main goal of content strategy is to use words and data to create unambiguous Rachel Lovinger content that supports meaningful, interactive experiences.” “If you want to be interesting, Content Strategy: The Philosophy of Data (2007) be interested.”
    50. 50. Communicating Your MissionUse brand architecture to go from the abstract to the specific.
    51. 51. Mission, Purpose, Brand We’re not that different.
    52. 52. Mission, Purpose, Brand YOU ARE HERE
    53. 53. Tie Messaging to Brand VISION: A world where good prevails over evil. Luke, I need to tell you MISSION: We leverage mystical forces as part of a Universal something. alliance to protect peace and justice. POSITION: We want everyone to think of us as mysterious but ultimately helpful bad asses. OK, Obiwan, but stay on message. MESSAGING GUIDE: The Force (n.): Good way to describe our strange powers. Reminds folks we‟re channeling energies that exist all around us. Also: #TheForce SAMPLE MESSAGE: We‟re gathering. Join us 11/3 as we use #TheForce to destroy the #DeathStar. Good v evil! Pls RSVP: jed.is/KLT72 #shhhh
    54. 54. 4 Audience & Positioning ALL OUR AUDIENCES VolunteerMatch is the Web’s largest volunteer engagement network, offering solutions to make it easier for individuals, nonprofits and companies to make a difference. make easier for individuals, nonprofits and companies to make a difference. CORPS, GOVT, A MULTICHAPTER GENCIES, CAMP VOLUNTEERS NONPROFITS NONPROFITS USES WeWe make it make it easier We make it easier We make easier WeWe make it make it easier WeWe make it make it easier easier for you to for you to find a for your easiermanage to to manage easiermanage to to manage find a great place great place to organization to find successful successful to volunteer. volunteer. the volunteers you national volunteer community need. recruitment engagement programs. programs.
    55. 55. 5 Audience &Segmenting Volunteer Nonprofit Multichapter Business/Govt/Sch MSM Policy Funders Nonprofit ool/CSR Press Media/Acad Makers emic Type of Consumer B2B Advocacy & Outreach Audience Web services Web Services What they It’s hard to It’s hard to It’s hard to Good CSR is hard to It’s hard to find info about important think find a good find a good help our do. volunteer trends. place to volunteer. chapters volunteer diversify recruitment Web home VolunteerMatch.org Social home Our Engaging VolunteeringIs N/A Facebook Volunteers.org CSR.org Page Twitter @volunteermatch @vm_solutions @volunteermatch Facebook Our Facebook Page LinkedIn VolunteerMatch at Linkedin VolunteerMat VolunteerMatch at Linkedin ch Solutions Sub Group
    56. 56. Your Responsibilities to Brand
    57. 57. StorytellingUse the basics of story to connect on a human level and sustain interest.
    58. 58. Story Is A Journey Photo: aepoc
    59. 59. Be The Change WORLD COMMUNITY My family CHANGE and friends ME
    60. 60. The Volunteer‟s Story Achievement “Saving the Obstacle Universe? Best thing I ever did!” “Whoa, Death StarInstigation ahead. Nevermind!” “This princess totally needs me!”
    61. 61. The Engager‟s Story Achievement “Great Obstacle work, Luke! Just “Yup, this is two more films to hard. But go!”Instigation remember the“She‟s Force thing?depending on Give it a shot.”you, Luke.Hey,how „bout alight saber?
    62. 62. Parts of Not Volunteer StoryStories the Programs I‟m a story! I‟m a program! Who’s more engaging?
    63. 63. Collecting & Curating the Experience Optimizing For Storytelling
    64. 64. Social Media Sharing SavingPhoto: Flickr/courosa
    65. 65. Determine the Need ConstituentsSaving SharingSocial Sharing Public
    66. 66. Improve Your Odds • Invest in cameras! Remind supporters to bring cameras. • Run photo/video/story contests • Send out surveys/polls • Engagers volunteers as reporters and shooters • Monitor channels for comments/testimonials • Remind supporters to use hashtags
    67. 67. Corralling Your Content Professional Videos Networks (Youtube) (LinkedIn) Social Events Networks (Eventbrite) (Facebook) Volunteer Micromedia Website/ lead sources (Twitter) Blog (Volunteer Match) 97
    68. 68. Website Commandments “Your Support page MUST have a range of options like donating, gifts in kind, and “You MUST have “The word volunteering.” a page dedicated volunteers MUST to volunteering… appear on your with links to your home page or social networks.” your website.” Jayne Cravens, Coyote Communications 98
    69. 69. How Much Is Too Frequent? 99
    70. 70. Creating Flexible Content • Make it easy for supporters to share. • Avoid cross-posting if you can. Follow specifications for different platforms. • Write messaging guides for everyone ahead of time. • Include links to photos, graphics or videos for preview and recap. • Remember: It’s not collected until it’s archived. 100
    71. 71. Bringing It TogetherSocial Content & The 3 Rs of Volunteer Engagement
    72. 72. 3 R‟s In Action Friend Recognize Recruit Coming back for more & telling others about it Work Family Retain
    73. 73. 3 R‟s In Action Recognize, Recruit
    74. 74. 3 R‟s In Action Recognize, Recruit
    75. 75. 3 R‟s In Action Recognize, Recruit
    76. 76. 3 R‟s In Action Recruit
    77. 77. 3 R‟s In Action Recruit, Retain.
    78. 78. 3 R‟s In Action Recognize
    79. 79. 3 R‟s In Action Recruit
    80. 80. 3 R‟s In Action Recruit, Recognize
    81. 81. Friends of Trees “If we can reach lots of people via social media those are part of the touches that contribute to turning volunteers out to our events” “While we dont understand the exact impacts on our other goals, we suspect only good things are coming from our social media efforts.” Jenny Bedell-Stiles Volunteer & Outreach Specialist Friends of Trees
    82. 82. Friends of Trees
    83. 83. Friends of Trees
    84. 84. Friends of Trees
    85. 85. Friends of Trees
    86. 86. 3 R‟s In Action
    87. 87. 3 R‟s In Action
    88. 88. 3 R‟s In Action
    89. 89. Workshop!What‟s Your Social Media Content Strategy? 30 Minutes
    90. 90. Say What? Final Tips on Social Media & Content • As culture is changing, people want what you have. Be confident and proud. • To engage, be engaged first. • Let your brand guide your messaging. • It’s all about stories. Their story, your story, our story. • Don’t forget your website. It comes first. • Which platforms you use depend on what you intend to accomplish. There are differences. • Social media makes the 3 Rs easier.
    91. 91. Awesome Content ResourcesGeneral Content and Social Media Forum One www.forumone.comBeth Kanterwww.bethkanter.org Social Brite www.socialbrite.orgNTENwww.nten.org Specific to Volunteer EngagementSocial Media for Nonprofits Engaging Volunteers (VolunteerMatch)www.socialmedia4nonprofits.org www.EngagingVolunteers.orgBcause Coyote Communicationswww.bcausemedia.com www.coyotecommunications.comBig Duckwww.bigducknyc.com
    92. 92. Say What?Conteent
    93. 93. Agenda: 15 Minute Break • Strategy • Break • Listening • Break • Content • Break • Evaluation These materials are available under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 License.
    94. 94. Strategy Step by Step• Objectives• Audience• Integration• Tools and Tactics• Measurement These materials are available under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 License.
    95. 95. Social Media Evaluation @bobfilbin
    96. 96. Introduction: Deciding to Evaluate
    97. 97. Introduction: Deciding to EvaluateHave all of you make achange in how youevaluate social mediawhen you return towork.
    98. 98. Introduction: Deciding to Evaluate
    99. 99. Introduction: Deciding to Evaluate
    100. 100. Introduction: Who Will Evaluate?
    101. 101. Intro: Who Will Evaluate?
    102. 102. Three Steps to Evaluation Gather → Analyze → Act
    103. 103. Gathering DataProblem: So much data!- Facebook Insights alone: Over 1,000 metricsSolution: Ask “What Action Can I Take?”Otherwise, it’s 010011 100101 000110
    104. 104. Gathering DataForget ThisStart with This
    105. 105. Gathering Data(Free) Tools• Facebook: Insights – Post-Level Data, Lifetime Talking About This…• Twitter: Crowdbooster – Retweets, Replies, Impressions• Website Referral Traffic: Google Analytics – # Visitors from Social, # of Conversions
    106. 106. Analyzing Data
    107. 107. Analyzing Data
    108. 108. Analyzing Data
    109. 109. Acting on Data• 36x as many people talking about these vs. regular posts. (That’s 1 week’s worth of posts.)
    110. 110. Acting on Data
    111. 111. Acting on Data
    112. 112. Acting on Data“…the sequence of change is not ANALYZE-THINK- CHANGE, but rather SEE-FEEL-CHANGE.”
    113. 113. Acting on Data“…the sequence of change is not ANALYZE-THINK- CHANGE, but rather SEE-FEEL-CHANGE.”
    114. 114. • Amy Sample Ward • Melinda Chang • @amyrsward • NPower• Noland Hoshino • Robert Rosenthal • Bob Filbin• @nolandhoshino • @volmatchrobert • @bobfilbin These materials are available under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 License.

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