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Teaching literature
 

Teaching literature

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Introduction to teaching Literature

Introduction to teaching Literature

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    Teaching literature Teaching literature Presentation Transcript

    • 1. What is the world'shortest play? 2. What is the world'd shortest poetry form? 3. It is a book of observations and musings recorded by Sei Shonagon during her time as court lady. (Japanese Lit) 4. It is a popular novel by Kamala Markandaya (India) WHO WROTE EACH LITERARY WORK? A. Hills Like White Elephants B. The Bet C. A Rose for Emily D. Age of Innocence E. A Doll's House F. Essays in Idleness G. The Road Not Taken H. Sherlock Holmes
    • Why teach Literature? (Duff and Maley, 1990) 1. LINGUISTIC In terms of language acquisition and learning, literary texts offer samples of a very wide range of styles, registers and text types at many levels of difficulty. 2. METHODOLOGICAL -SInce literary texts are open to multiple interpretations, readers can have different opinions and ideas about a variety of topics. This provides learners an opportunity to engage in genuine interaction. The learners can even be taught to develop critical thinking.
    • 3. MOTIVATIONAL Literary texts are non-trivial since they deal with matters which concerned the writer enough to make him or her write about them. In this they are unlike many other forms of language teaching inputs, which frequently trivialize experience in the service of pedagogy. Literary texts touch on themes to which learners can bring a personal response from their own experience.
    • How do readers respond to literature? How can we make our students respond to literature? DESCRIPTION Students can talk or write about what they read in their own words DISCRIMINATION Students can discriminate among the different literary texts. They can identify them by type, author or theme.
    • How do readers respond to literature? How can we make our students respond to literature? RELATION Students can relate several elements of a litetary text to each other or to other texts INTERPRETATION Students can figure out what they think the author is saying and defend their style
    • How do readers respond to literature? How can we make our students respond to literature? GENERALIZATION Students can draw out the main idea of a piece of literary work or an author's style EVALUATING Students can evaluate the worth of a piece of literature using a set of criteria
    • How do readers respond to literature? How can we make our students respond to literature? VALUING Students can indicate the importance of literature to their own lives or to the world outside of the text CREATION Students can respond creatively by making art projects, composing a musical medley, producing an MTV, writing another stanza for a poem or another chapter or novel etc
    • FICTION -fiction is any imaginative recreation and reconstruction of life -It includes short stories and novels. THE ELEMENTS OF FICTION: A. Setting - time and place B. Characters C. Plot - Parts of the Plot - exposition, complication, crisis climax, denouement
    • D. Point of View E. Theme POETRY ESSAY DRAMA
    • D. Point of View E. Theme POETRY ESSAY DRAMA
    • A. Achilles' heel -the weakest point of one's personality or something that marks the weakes point of a person B. Herculean task -a great or impossible task; something that is almost impossible to do C. Apple of discord -the object of conflict
    • A. Achilles' heel -the weakest point of one's personality or something that marks the weakes point of a person B. Herculean task -a great or impossible task; something that is almost impossible to do C. Apple of discord -the object of conflict
    • Arena - the theater style of early Greeks. The actors are surrounded on all sides by the audience and they make entrances and exits through the aisles. This establishes intimate relationship with the audience
    • Medieval Theater - this used staging areas called mansions inside the churches and portable wagons wheeled about outside the churches Elizabethan theater - this used staging areas called mansions inside the churches and portable wagons wheeled about outside the churches.
    • Elizabethan Theater
    • Genres of Drama Tragedy - a type of drama that shows the downfall and destruction of a noble or outstanding person, traditionally one who possesses a character weakness called a tragic flaw. The tragic hero, through choice or circumstance, is caught up in a sequence of events that inevitably results in disaster.
    • Genres of Drama Comedy - a type of drama intended to interest and amuse the audience rather than make them deeply concerned about events that happen. The characters overcome some difficulties, but they always overcome their ill fortune and find happiness in the end.
    • Genres of Drama Tragicomedy - a play that does not adhere strictly to the structure of tragedy. This is usually a serious play that also has some of the qualities of a comedy. It arouses thought even with laughter. Farce - has very swift movements, has ridiculous situations, and does not stimulate thought. Example: Comedy of Errors, The Taming of the Shrew
    • Genres of Drama Tragicomedy - a play that does not adhere strictly to the structure of tragedy. This is usually a serious play that also has some of the qualities of a comedy. It arouses thought even with laughter. Farce - has very swift movements, has ridiculous situations, and does not stimulate thought. Example: Comedy of Errors, The Taming of the Shrew
    • Genres of Drama Farce - has very swift movements, has ridiculous situations, and does not stimulate thought. Example: Comedy of Errors, The Taming of the Shrew