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Academic Freedom and Civil liberty in Education
 

Academic Freedom and Civil liberty in Education

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Academic Freedom and Civil Liberty in Education

Academic Freedom and Civil Liberty in Education

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    Academic Freedom and Civil liberty in Education Academic Freedom and Civil liberty in Education Presentation Transcript

    • ACADEMICFREEDOM AND ITSCONTROVERSIES
    • The University of the Philippines at Diliman affairwhere controversy erupted after Professor GerardoA. Agulto of the College of Business Administrationwas sued by MBA graduate student Chanda R.Shahani for a nominal amount in damages for failinghim several times in the Strategic Managementportion of the Comprehensive Examination. Agultorefused to give a detailed basis for his grades andinstead invoked Academic Freedom while Shahaniargued in court that Academic Freedom could not beinvoked without a rational basis in grading a student.
    • In 2006 trade union leader and sociologist FazelKhan was fired from the University of KwaZulu-Nagal in South Africa after taking a leadershiprole in a strike. In 2008 international concernwas also expressed at attempts to discipline twoother academicians at the same university -Nithiya Chetty and John van der Berg - forexpressing concern about academic freedom atthe university.
    • William Shockley of England was concernedabout relatively high reproductive ratesamong people of African descent, becausehe believed that genetics doomed blackpeople to be intellectually inferior to whitepeople.He was strongly criticized for thisstand, which raised some concerns aboutwhether criticism of unpopular views ofracial differences suppressed academicfreedom.
    • is the freedom to teach, study andpursue knowledge withoutunreasonable interference orrestriction from law, institutionalregulations or public pressure
    • The belief that the freedom of inquiry byfaculty members is essential to themission of the academy, and that scholarsshould have freedom to teach orcommunicate ideas or facts (includingthose that are inconvenient to externalpolitical groups or to authorities) withoutbeing targeted for repression, job loss, orimprisonment
    • Is predicated on the theory that socialprogress occurs through individuals whodepart from the conventional ways ofthinking and actingThe philosophy of this method holds thatit is good for the teacher to provide alarge measure of freedom in theeducational program in order to liberatewhatever genius is latent in any child.
    • 1. FACULY ACADEMIC FREEDOM2. INSTITUTIONAL ACADEMICFREEDOM3. STUDENT ACADEMIC FREEDOM
    • Teachers are entitled to freedom inthe classroom in discussing theirsubject, but they should be carefulnot to introduce controversialmatters that has no relation to theirsubject. Limitations of academicfreedom should be stated in writingat the time of appointment.
    • The curriculum belongs to theinstitution not to the faculty.The institution can demand certainstandards of teaching and evaluatethe faculty against those standards.
    • The curriculum belongs to theinstitution not to the faculty.The institution can demand certainstandards of teaching and evaluatethe faculty against those standards.
    • Institutions reserve the right todetermine1. Who may teach2. Who may be taught3. How it shall be taught4. Who may be admitted to study
    • The professor in the classroom shouldencourage free discussion, inquiry andexpression.Student performance should beevaluated solely on academic basis, noton opinions or conduct in mattersunrelated to academic standards.
    • In the PhilippinesThe 1987 Philippine Constitution statesthat, "Academic Freedom shall beenjoyed in all institutions of higherlearning
    •  The teacher is a citizen as well as ateacher. He would like to be free asother citizens in deciding to join achurch or a political party, to wear astyle of clothes, to dance and todrink or smoke. So long as heexercises freedom in these mattersin conformity with hiscommunity, not troubles will arise.
    •  If the teacher departs from the norms orstereotypes of the community, his fellowcitizens would criticize his exercise ofCIVIL LIBERTY. A teacher teaches by example even onout of school hours and off the schoolgrounds just as well as during the timehe is officially in school.
    •  Since the democratic community has theright to prescribe the curriculum it wantstaught, it is only proper that the teachershould conform to its dictates inexercising his liberties as a citizen. Any man or woman, on becoming ateacher may well feel honored to ascendany pedestal of civic virtue. Ifunwilling, he should resign or seekanother position
    • Teachers are not always able to distinguishclearly between their academic freedom andtheir civil libertyFrequently, when they have exercised theircivil liberties in such a way as to offend thecommunity and the community demandstheir dismissal, they claim that dismissalwould be an infringement of their academicfreedom.
    • When a professor of Chemistry puts himselfon public record as to his views oncommunism, he is really speaking as acitizen and not as a professor. On the topic ofcommunism he is no more competent thanany other man. Therefore the onlyprotection he can expect is the protection ofhis civil liberties, not of his academicfreedom.
    • When a professor of Chemistry puts himselfon public record as to his views oncommunism, he is really speaking as acitizen and not as a professor. On the topic ofcommunism he is no more competent thanany other man. Therefore the onlyprotection he can expect is the protection ofhis civil liberties, not of his academicfreedom.
    • In exercising their civil liberties offcampus, students must expect to run therisks of ordinary citizens, which is, indeedall they are. If they challenge the authority ofcivil officers, they will have to abide theconsequences. Nor should campusauthorities put students in double jeopardyby taking jurisdiction of the same offensewhen students return to the campus.
    • Although under extreme provocation civilpolice may have to invade the campus orschool, it is much better if these academicprecincts remain inviolate as a guaranteeofthe freedom which properly obtains there.